What logos package is best for a pastor in rural iowa

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This post has 32 Replies | 3 Followers

Posts 3
Timothy D. Curtiss | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 10 2014 8:29 PM

Bill,

Thanks.  I would like to get together also.  I purchased a package in seminary but I do not remember which one it was.  It as 300 volumes.  

Posts 611
Graham Owen | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 11 2014 3:52 AM

Timothy D. Curtiss:
I purchased a package in seminary but I do not remember which one it was.

Help - About Logos will tell you what the package you have currently is.

God Bless

Graham

Pastor - NTCOG Basingstoke

Posts 3
Timothy D. Curtiss | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 12 2014 1:37 PM

Thanks.  I tried that but it did not work.  I found the installation disc of my logos program.  It is Logos Bible Software 3.0 F Libronix with books.

Posts 1634
Ken McGuire | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 12 2014 1:51 PM

Timothy D. Curtiss:
I found the installation disc of my logos program.  It is Logos Bible Software 3.0 F Libronix with books.

Unfortunately that isn't quite enough information.  Logos has had multiple packages with the same installation media since I got into it with Libronix 2.0.

Did you ever sychronize your license with the Logos Servers back in the day?  If so, there should be a record of you somewhere in their database, and logos 5 would automatically give you those books.

But I strongly recommend calling Logos Customer Service.  They should be able to help you much easier than we could talk you through it.

SDG

Ken McGuire

The Gospel is not ... a "new law," on the contrary, ... a "new life." - William Julius Mann

L8 Anglican, Lutheran and Orthodox Silver, Reformed Basic, Academic Essentials

L7 Lutheran Gold, Anglican Bronze

Posts 7073
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 12 2014 3:22 PM

Go for broke and get Platinum.  Now with the new 24 month payment plan you might be able to afford it.  If not at least get Gold. Stick out tongue

Posts 3942
abondservant | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 12 2014 5:18 PM

Timothy D. Curtiss:

Thanks.  I tried that but it did not work.  I found the installation disc of my logos program.  It is Logos Bible Software 3.0 F Libronix with books.



I would make figuring that out your priority - you don't have to re-purchase books, so IF you have books that you already own, that are a part of the package you want to buy, the cost of the package goes down. Might mean the difference between gold and platinum or portfolio :P Depending on what you had before.

L2 lvl4, L3 Scholars, L4 Scholars, L5 Platinum,  L6 Collectors. L7 Baptist Portfolio. L8 Baptist Platinum.

Posts 2964
tom | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 13 2014 5:28 AM

abondservant:
I would make figuring that out your priority - you don't have to re-purchase books, so IF you have books that you already own, that are a part of the package you want to buy, the cost of the package goes down. Might mean the difference between gold and platinum or portfolio :P Depending on what you had before.
Yes

Posts 1706
JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 13 2014 4:08 PM

God bless all those you meet in here and on your way to expanding God's Kingdom Mission on earth, Sir.

I hope someone is able to make a search in here on all the great tools in Logos and Vyrso that are geared for new pastors.

I long to see you do well and I will even go so far as to say - May this be your ONLY church until Jesus comes back (meaning I hope you never have to look for another post ever).

Glory to God...Jesus Lead On!

Joshua

Posts 13392
Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 13 2014 4:13 PM

Timothy D. Curtiss:
I recently graduated from seminary and have my first church in a small city in rural Iowa.  I do not have time to do the extensive research that I did in seminary.  I would like to update my logos. Which package do you think is best for a busy pastor in rural Iowa?

It might be worth checking out the new Reformed Base Packages.

Posts 1706
JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 13 2014 4:55 PM

Dan, would someone who is NOT using New Living Translation still use and like the Cornerstone series?
I have read its much like the Tyndale...that true?

Posts 5285
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 13 2014 5:34 PM

Here is a sample... I would say you do not need to use or even particularly enjoy the NLT to like cornerstone. The OT in general is more in-depth in the Cornerstone, I find much of Tyndale NT is more drawn from greek used than I would say of Cornerstone.

-Dan

♦ B. Psalm 44


NOTES
44:2 crushed. The NLT apparently presumes an emendation from tara‘ [7489, 8317] (“do evil”; from ra‘a‘ I) to taroa‘ [7489A, 8318] (“crush”; from ra‘a‘ II); see HALOT 3.1271 and 2:9.

44:4 my God. You command. In the MT there is not a suffix for “my,” and the form of the verb is an imperative, which is grammatically problematic (Kraus 1988:444). The NLT apparently presumes an emendation to a participle metsawweh [6680, 7422] (“commanding”; see the LXX and Syriac); the Mem of the participle could have been transferred backward to the preceding word, which would have been e’lohay [430/2967.1, 466/3276] (“my God”; see Syriac). This verb is used in the same sense in 42:8 [9] (“pours his unfailing love” is lit., “commands his unfailing love”).

victories. The word yeshu‘oth [3444, 3802] occurs in 42:5 Devil, 11 [12] and 43:5, where it is translated, “Savior.”

44:5–6 push back … trample … trust … count on … to save. The verbs in these verses are imperfects, signifying repeated action in the past (Joüon and Muraoka 1991:§113e); note the perfects for past time in 44:7 Music. Psalm 44:1–3 [2–4] is about the distant past. Psalm 44:4–8 [5–9] is about the recent past of the psalmist’s own day. Psalm 44:9 [10] brings us to the psalmist’s present.

44:8 give glory … constantly praise. “Gave glory … constantly praised” in keeping with the note on 44:5–6.

44:9 tossed us aside. The word zanakh [2186, 2396] (reject) occurs in 43:2; see also 44:23 [24], where it is translated “reject.”

44:16 mockers. The word kharap [2778, 3070] occurs in 42:10 [11].

enemies. The “enemies” are mentioned in 42:9 [10] and 43:2.

44:24 oppression. The word lakhats [3906, 4316] occurs in 42:9 [10] and 43:2; in 42:9 [10] it occurs in the context of God forgetting, as is also the case here in 44:24.

44:25 lying face down in the dirt. Lit., “Our belly clings to the ground.”


COMMENTARY

The number of lexical connections between Psalms 42–43 and Psalm 44 (see notes) indicates that Psalm 44 can be read as a corporate articulation of the individual problem expressed in Psalms 42–43. Both texts articulate profound perplexity at God’s rejecting (43:2; 44:10, 23) and forgetting (42:9; 44:24) his people, who are experiencing the oppression (42:9; 43:2; 44:24) of the enemy (42:9; 43:2; 44:16). Psalm 44 adds to the perplexity without solving it.
Psalm 44 can be divided into three stanzas: past victories through faith in God (44:1–8), present defeats in spite of faithfulness to God (44:9–22), and future salvation through the unfailing love of God (44:23–26).

Past Victories through Faith in God (44:1–8). The opening stanza is a record of covenant loyalty in the past, loyalty on the part of God and his people. The stanza is comprised of two strophes. The first strophe (44:1–3) records the covenant faithfulness of the distant past. “In days long ago” God dispossessed the Canaanites from the Promised Land and gave that land “to our ancestors.” The ancestors did not conquer the land through dependence on their own resources but through dependence on the Lord and his favor. This all took place in accordance with the theology of Deuteronomy 28:1–2, 7: Covenant loyalty results in military victory.
The second strophe (44:4–8) records the covenant faithfulness of the recent past. The psalmist affirms that the same covenant loyalty experienced by his ancestors has been experienced by the community in the recent past. God was the one who “command[ed] victories,” “[gave] us victory over our enemies,” and “disgraceDrinks those who hate us.” On their part the people had acknowledged that these victories were “only by [God’s] power” and “only in [his] name.” Like their ancestors, they did not trust in their own resources but trusted in God. Thus, they were careful to give him the glory and praise. Their experience was like that of previous generations: Covenant faithfulness had resulted in military victories.

Present Defeats in Spite of Faithfulness to God (44:9–22). The middle stanza paints a radically different picture. This stanza is comprised of two strophes. The first strophe (44:9–16) provides the details of the present situation. God’s people are in desperate straits, having experienced defeat after military defeat. The emphasis in this strophe is on the fact that these defeats are the Lord’s doing. The Lord is the subject of the vast majority of the verbs: He has tossed his people aside, no longer leads their armies, made them retreat, allowed them to be plundered, treated them like sheep for slaughter, scattered them, sold them for nothing, placed no value on them, caused them to be mocked, and made them the butt of jokes.
Based on the theology implicit in 44:1–8 and explicit in Deuteronomy 28:15 and 25, we would expect the second strophe in this stanza to contain a confession of sin. So we are shocked that the second strophe contains a most vigorous protestation of innocence. “All this has happened though we have not forgotten you. We have not violated your covenant” (44:17). And this loyalty was not merely external. It was a loyalty from the heart. In spite of such loyalty, God’s people had been “crushed” and “covered … with darkness and death” (44:19). The people admitted that God’s actions would be understandable had they turned from God to idols. But such had not been the case. The people were not claiming sinlessness but only basic loyalty (Mays 1994:178)—the same kind of loyalty demonstrated by their ancestors in the distant past and by themselves in the recent past. In some way they were not suffering because of their sin but for God’s sake. This profound perplexity did not lead to unbelief, however, but to prayer.

Future Salvation through the Unfailing Love of God (44:23–26). The prayer begins with three imperatives: “Wake up!” and “Get up!” and “Do not reject.” It is as if God had been sleeping and needed to be aroused from his slumber. The prayer is for their present rejection to end.
Two lamenting interrogatives follow: “Why do you look the other way?” and “Why do you ignore our suffering and oppression?” God’s people had not forgotten him (shakakh [7911, 8894] in 44:20 [21]), so why had he forgotten and ignored (shakakh) them (44:24 [25])? These two interrogatives are balanced by two lamenting indicatives: “We collapse in the dust” and “our belly clings to the ground” (see note on 44:25).
The mood returns to that of the beginning of the stanza with two final imperatives (in the MT): “Rise up!” and “Help us” (44:26). While it is true that the psalm ends on a mixed note of lamentation and petition, it is significant that the last word in the MT is khesed [2617, 2876]. The last word is not “why” but “unfailing love.”
This final stanza is “prayer rooted in a faith deeper than reason,” for “there is an immense mystery in God and his ways, but one must continue to trust and to pray” (Craigie 1983:335). Psalm 44 expresses a mysterious suffering in the service of the Kingdom. This suffering points forward to Christ and then to Romans 8:17–39 (Mays 1994:179–200), where Paul quotes 44:22, “For your sake we are killed every day; we are being slaughtered like sheep” (Rom 8:36). Throughout the history of the church, there have been faithful Christians who have suffered and have even been put to death at the hands of persecutors. They were called to share in Christ’s suffering that they might also share in his glory (Rom 8:17). They could do so knowing, like the author of Psalm 44, that no suffering could ever separate them from God’s unfailing love.
When we experience mysterious suffering in the service of the Kingdom, let us take full advantage of the freedom God has given us in Psalm 44, freedom to honestly admit our perplexity, to lament our situation, and to pray for help, depending all the while on God’s unfailing love.


Mark D. Futato, “The Book of Psalms,” in Cornerstone Biblical Commentary, Vol 7: The Book of Psalms, The Book of Proverbs (Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2009), 161–164.

Posts 4625
RIP
Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 14 2014 1:59 PM

Great Quote, Dan!             I really appreciate Futato!          Thanks!      AND    Peace!

                                                               *smile*

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 81
Jim Wait | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 14 2014 6:35 PM

The "Everyone Series" by N T Wright

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