Dracula Comes to Our Local Bible?

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fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 8:46 AM

James Hudson:
It is amazing in so many years of being a Logos customer and owning nearly 16 thousand Logos resources that I have never had any pre-pub "Order updates" until the last 18 months talking about removing books from collections or items that are no longer on sale (MacArthur etc). It seems interesting that this happened concurrently with the introduction of Noet and resources like 'Dracula'. No direct evidence but seems clear in my mind!

I think that has more to do with your mind.Wink

Most removed books come from CP collections. The simple explanation is almost certainly that Logos believed the book was  Public Domain, and then it turns out it wasn't, so they have to remove it. The few times it happens in prepub, I would imagine the reason is that the publisher thought he had all rights, and then it turns out he didn't have the electronic rights. Or something else of that nature. Nothing to do with Dracula. (If a publisher objected to Dracula, he wouldn't remove one book out of a collection, he would remove the whole collection, as well as all other collections.)

As for whole publishers leaving, that happened in the past as well. OUP and Liturgical Press, for example. It ought, statistically, to happen more often now, since they work with so many more publishers, but my impression is that it instead happens more seldom. In fact, both of those publishers are now back. Publisher problems are always far more likely to be due to legal and financial causes, than ideological ones. Few publishers mind where their books are sold, as long as they are and they get paid.

"The Christian way of life isn't so much an assignment to be performed, as a gift to be received."  Wilfrid Stinissen

Mac Pro OS 10.9.

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 9:34 AM

Peace to my Logos Community Forums Brothers and Sisters                       *smile*

                       Maybe I'm finally old enough to get organized, do you think?      

                                  I DO have Excel on my Computer, and I think I could learn to use some of its aspects ...

What I'm wondering is .............            has anyone made an excel file of "books to read" that he/she would be willing to share ....

                I am somewhat "daunted" when I look at the GoodReads List over against making my own Excel File; however, I think I might be able to keep one up ...........                   beggars can't be choosey they say, but it would be nice to have a "percentage" feature included to easily check what progress I may have made over  a lifetime???     *smile*

Milford Charles Murray:

Peace to all!               Will be 78 in a few weeks!         *smile*                    Only my Wonderful God and Father knows when I will leave here to be Always With Him!                 Praise Him that He Is Here With Me!          ...   and us!

             My point:             I might be privileged by God to do lots and lots of reading before He Calls me Home!

Just came across this list of 1,001 books to read before I die ............https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/952.1001_Books_You_Must_Read_Before_You_Die

              I've actually read lots and lots of them ........                       Will be reading tonight, eh?!    *smile*

Edit:         Just noticed .......    Dracula is number 29 on the list ....

                   And!       I rejoice that I have -- right now! -- many of the others in my Logos Library!         Thanks Logos for the 5 Apps for my iPad!

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 19192
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 9:55 AM

Milford Charles Murray:
    I am somewhat "daunted" when I look at the GoodReads List over against making my own Excel File; however, I think I might be able to keep one up ...........                   beggars can't be choosey they say, but it would be nice to have a "percentage" feature included to easily check what progress I may have made over  a lifetime???  

Milford, life is too short to have your reading choices governed by someone else's "must read before you die" book list! Let your joys and interest guide your reading choices. It doesn't matter if you accomplish some percentage of the "great books" if it means you spend all your reading time haunted by that looming deadline and the massive amounts of reading you haven't done yet.

It's fine to use a list like that for inspiration if you're looking for a great book to read next. But never let it become your master. I would recommend NOT setting it up as a percentage thing. It will only make you feel guilty and inadequate.

Posts 1875
Paul-C | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 10:00 AM

When I buy/download books I'd like to read cover-to-cover (as opposed to works I buy for reference purposes), I tag them with a "Must_Read" tag. Then, as I finish a book and look for the next to read, I filter my Must_Read tag and choose the one to read next. It's pretty simple, but ensures the books I want to enjoy in depth don't get lost in the rest of my library!

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 3:03 PM

Rosie Perera:
Milford, life is too short to have your reading choices governed by someone else's "must read before you die" book list! Let your joys and interest guide your reading choices.
i

Milford, my sister loves to read what reading lists recommend - she loves to know what others are reading and recommending, quite useful since she volunteers in a library. I, on the other hand, read on whim - or what I've been given for review. Both of us are well into retirement, both still reading, and neither having any regrets over our choice. I found several items on the list that I think I will give a try ... and was sad to see some of my favorites didn't make the list.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Joseph Turner | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 3:09 PM

I welcome the addition of secular literature as others do.  I will be glad when the stores are separated, but I am excited about the possible offerings!

Disclaimer:  I hate using messaging, texting, and email for real communication.  If anything that I type to you seems like anything other than humble and respectful, then I have not done a good job typing my thoughts.

Posts 2964
tom | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 4:39 PM

Disciple of Christ (doc):
 It's not like 50 shades has been put on community pricing
If it did, I would get it because it has reached a large audience of people that I know.

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 5:43 PM

Rosie and Martha!         *smile*            Peace and Every Blessing!                    I am truly honoured by your kind attention re. my request for an Excel file ...........

                         My big mistake -- and I apologise!!! -- was that I didn't properly communicate what I wanted it for .......

I sort of wanted some kind of record of all the reading that I've done over the many years -   a voracious reader indeed     I've never met anyone yet who's read as many and as wide a variety as I have   .............                  the standard Classics         -- scads of science fiction - New York Times lists -   Tom Clancy -- Harry Potter -- continued reading of usually more than a book a week - Robert Ludlum - Mark Twain - all kinds of theological works               etc. - etc. - etc.   !!!                        I thought I'd check to see if I wanted to read some of the works on that 1,001 list also -- and then "convert" it to sort of a diary of the reading of my life!                    *smile*                     

                    When the Lord calls me home, I sort of wanted to leave the list (what I've read!) with my 4 GrandBoys!      My 3 children already know what I've been into, methinks....

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Today 3:03 PM
Rosie Perera: Milford, life is too short to have your reading choices governed by someone else's "must read before you die" book list! Let your joys and interest guide your reading choices.

iMilford, my sister loves to read what reading lists recommend - she loves to know what others are reading and recommending, quite useful since she volunteers in a library. I, on the other hand, read on whim - or what I've been given for review. Both of us are well into retirement, both still reading, and neither having any regrets over our choice. I found several items on the list that I think I will give a try ... and was sad to see some of my favorites didn't make the list.

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 5317
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 6:21 PM

Milford Charles Murray:
Logos4catholics Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

When I tried to go to the link it gave me a 403.

-Dan

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Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 6:21 PM

Milford Charles Murray:
Logos4catholics Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

When I tried to go to the link it gave me a 403.

-Dan

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 6:29 PM

Blessings, Dan!       My faux pas!         Sorry!

                      When I responded to Rosie and MJ, instead of hitting the quote before I posted.... I copied and pasted from MJ's post to save time, not meaning to cause anyone great difficulty.            Just now I removed that by way of "edit"!       

                If you want to go to MJ's link, just go up a few posts and activate that link from her post!                  Again!    Am Sorry!           *smile*

Final Edit!      (I hope!)                Dan, just to make sure that I had "cleaned up" my mistake, I went back to MJ's post and tried the link, and it didn't work!                                   So, I guess it wasn't me after all ...............          *smile*                      ...    just a bad link which now you've caught!   *smile*

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 5317
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 8:00 PM

Milford Charles Murray:

Blessings, Dan!       My faux pas!         Sorry!

                      When I responded to Rosie and MJ, instead of hitting the quote before I posted.... I copied and pasted from MJ's post to save time, not meaning to cause anyone great difficulty.       

NO need, i tried to go to the link on the original in MJ's tagline and still get 403.... http://logos4catholics.org sounds interesting but it takes you too...

403 - Forbidden Error

You are not allowed to access this address. 
If the error persists, please contact the website webmaster.

If you are the webmaster of this site please log in to Cpanel and check the Error Logs. You will find the exact reason for this error there.

Common reasons for this error are:

  • Incorrect file/directory permissions: Below 644.

    In order files to be read by the webserver, their permissions have to be equal or above 644. You can update file permissions with a FTP client or through cPanel's File Manager.

  • Restrictive Apache directives inside .htaccess file.

    There are two Apache directives which can cause this error - 'Deny from' and 'Options -Indexes'.

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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 8:08 PM

Milford Charles Murray:
I sort of wanted some kind of record of all the reading that I've done over the many years -   a voracious reader indeed     I've never met anyone yet who's read as many and as wide a variety as I have   .............                  the standard Classics         -- scads of science fiction - New York Times lists -   Tom Clancy -- Harry Potter -- continued reading of usually more than a book a week - Robert Ludlum - Mark Twain - all kinds of theological works               etc. - etc. - etc.   !!!                        I thought I'd check to see if I wanted to read some of the works on that 1,001 list also -- and then "convert" it to sort of a diary of the reading of my life!     

That's great! And sorry I misunderstood the purpose of your request.

I did a Google search for "1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die" xlsx and I found this link to a spreadsheet someone has created that has two lists, for two editions of the 1001 Books book, with columns for marking which ones you've read (put an 'x' in that column if you've read it) and formulas for computing the percentage that you've already read. You have to trust the author and enable the spreadsheet for editing in order for the formulas to work, but it seemed like a legit reading-club website, and I've tried it and so far haven't noticed any virus-like behavior. Note that I should probably have scanned it with anti-virus software before trying it, but I didn't. (The famous "Do as I say, not as I do" advice.)

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 10:08 PM

Milford, here is my list of books that provoke interesting discussions for a Christian book club - in many cases, I'd recommend everything from the author, especially those in bold. It includes mysteries, true crime, holocaust literature, retellings of Biblical stories, inter-faith relations, social issues, human foibles... Many of them are things recommended by others that I worked with. I'd be curious how many of them you've run into. They should all be in Logos, of course.

  1. Moscow to the End of the Line by Venedikt Erofeev
  2. Brother Jacob by Henrik Stangerup
  3. Dreamers by Knut Hamsun
  4. A Month in the Country by J. L. Carr
  5. River Angel: A Novel by A. Manette Ansay
  6. The Night Trilogy: Night, Dawn, The Accident by Elie Wiesel
  7. The Man in the Box by Thomas Moran
  8. Lying Awake by Mark Salzman
  9. On Parole by Akira Yoshimura
  10. Quarantine: A Novel by Jim Crace
  11. Mariette in Ecstasy by Ron Hansen
  12. Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
  13. Death Comes for the Archbishop by Willa Cather
  14. Sparrow : A Novel by Frances Frenaye
  15. The Lark. by adapted by Lillian Hellman Jean Anouilh
  16. The Name of the Rose: including the Author's Postscript by Umberto Eco
  17. The Three-Arched Bridge by Ismail Kadare
  18. Eleazar, Exodus to the West by Michel Tournier
  19. Yosl Rakover Talks to God by Carol Brown Janeway
  20. The Blue Lantern: Stories by Victor Pelevin
  21. Gospel: A Novel by Wilton Barnhardt
  22. Santal by Ronald Firbank
  23. Parrot's Perch by Michel Rio
  24. Jesus Tales by Romulus Linney
  25. The Angel of Galilea by Laura Restrepo
  26. The Miracle Hater by Shulamith Hareven
  27. A Mass for Arras by Andrzej Szczypiorski
  28. Aunt Safiyya and the Monastery: A Novel by Bahaa' Taher
  29. Class Trip: A Novel by Emmanuel Carrere
  30. Saving Grace by Lee Smith
  31. Saint Joan by Stanley Weintraub
  32. The Life of God (as Told by Himself) by Franco Ferrucci
  33. Doruntine by Ismail Kadare
  34. The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  35. Bless Me, Ultima by Rudolfo A. Anaya
  36. Three Tales by Gustave Flaubert
  37. Saint Joan of the Stockyards by Bertolt Brecht
  38. Heart of a Dog by Mikhail Bulgakov
  39. The Bible According to Mark Twain: Irreverent Writings on Eden, Heaven, and the Flood by America's Master Satirist by Mark Twain
  40. The Love Letters of a Portuguese Nun by vicomte de Gabriel Joseph de Lavergne Guilleragues
  41. The Diary of a Country Priest: A Novel by Georges Bernanos
  42. God's Trombones: Seven Negro Sermons in Verse by James Weldon Johnson
  43. JB: A Play in Verse by Archibald MacLeish
  44. The Last Temptation of Christ by Nikos Kazantzakis
  45. The Gospel According to Jesus Christ by Giovanni Pontiero
  46. The Diaries of Adam & Eve by Mark Twain
  47. The Temptation of Saint Anthony by Gustave Flaubert
  48. The Archivist: A Novel by Martha Cooley
  49. Shame by Annie Ernaux
  50. Happening by Annie Ernaux
  51. Pilate's Wife by H. D.
  52. The Man Who Died by D. H. Lawrence
  53. Mirabilis by Susann Cokal
  54. The Old Religion: A Novel by David Mamet
  55. The Wooden Sea: A Novel by Jonathan Carroll
  56. The Yellow Arrow by Victor Pelevin
  57. The Holy Sinner by Thomas Mann
  58. The Journal of Hildegard of Bingen by Barbara Lachman
  59. Old Rosa by Reinaldo Arenas
  60. Barlaam and Ioasaph by John Damascene
  61. The Work of Betrayal by Mario Brelich
  62. Navigator of the Flood by Mario Brelich
  63. Holy Embrace by Mario Brelich
  64. Tears and Saints by E. M. Cioran
  65. The Book of Shares by Mark C. Taylor
  66. Saint Francis by Nikos Kazantzakis
  67. Night's Lies by Gesualdo Bufalino
  68. In the Company of Angels: A Novel by N. M. Kelby
  69. Quarantine: A Novel by Jim Crace
  70. Cain by Jose Saramago
  71. Glass, Irony and God by Anne Carson
  72. Desire for a Beginning/Dread of One Single End by Edmond Jabes
  73. How I Came to Know Fish by Robert McDowell
  74. The Christ of Fish by Yoel Hoffmann
  75. The Collected Stories of Moacyr Scliar by Moacyr Scliar
  76. The Dwarf by Pär Lagerkvist
  77. Blindness by Giovanni Pontiero
  78. Sanatorium Under the Sign of the Hourglass by Bruno Schulz
  79. In the Palm of Darkness: A Novel by Mayra Montero
  80. Annie John: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid
  81. Master I Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
  82. Waiting for Godot: A Tragicomedy in Two Acts by Samuel Beckett
  83. One Deadly Summer by Sebastien Japrisot
  84. Still Life With Insects by Brian Kiteley
  85. Geronimo's Ponies by Harold Burton Meyers
  86. Pass the Butterworms: Remote Journeys Oddly Rendered by Tim Cahill
  87. The Way of a Serpent by Torgny Lindgren
  88. The Retreat: A novel by Aharon Appelfeld
  89. Akhenaten: Dweller in Truth A Novel by Naguib Mahfouz
  90. Damascus Nights by Rafik Schami
  91. Imperial Messages: One Hundred Modern Parables by Howard Schwartz
  92. The Conference of the Birds by Farid-Ud-Din Attar
  93. Parables of Kierkegaard by Soren Kierkegaard
  94. The Name of a Bullfighter by Luis Sepulveda
  95. The Two Deaths of Señora Puccini by Stephen Dobyns
  96. The Missing Head of Damasceno Monteiro by Antonio Tabucchi
  97. On Parole: A Novel by the Author of Shipwrecks by Akira Yoshimura
  98. Ka: Stories of the Mind and Gods of India by Roberto Calasso
  99. Sparrow : A Novel by Frances Frenaye
  100. Dust on Her Tongue by Rodrigo Rey Rosa
  101. The Angel of Galilea by Laura Restrepo
  102. The Postman (Il Postino) by Antonio Skarmeta
  103. A Life of Jesus by Shusaku Endo
  104. City of Wrong: A Friday in Jerusalem by Kamel M. Hussein
  105. Live from Golgotha: The Gospel According to Gore Vidal by Gore Vidal
  106. The Gospel According to the Son by Norman Mailer
  107. The Man Who Died by D. H. Lawrence
  108. Secrets of the Camera Obscura by David Knowles
  109. A Lovely Tale of Photography: A Film Novella by Peter Nadas
  110. The Adventures of a Photographer in La Plata by Adolfo Bioy Casares
  111. The Rings of Saturn by Winfried Georg Sebald
  112. All Souls Day by Cees Nooteboom
  113. Tzili: The Story of a Life by Aharon Appelfeld
  114. The Red Tent by Anita Diamant
  115. Things Fall Apart: A Novel by Chinua Achebe
  116. The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski
  117. The Kite Runner by Khalen Hosseini
  118. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  119. The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 13 2014 11:15 PM

I've found a nice Jewish list ...

JEWISH AUTHORS


JINFO.ORG

Listed below is a selection of prominent fiction and nonfiction authors who were, or are, Jewish (or of partial Jewish descent, as noted).  For lists of Jewish playwrights, screenwriters, poets, and other Jewish writers, see Jews in Literature.

  • Shmuel Agnon, The Bridal Canopy; A Guest for the Night, The Day Before Yesterday 1966 Nobel Prize in Literature
  • Vasily Aksyonov 1, The Burn, Generations of Winter, The Island of Crimea
  • Aharon Appelfeld, Badenheim 1939, The Immortal Bartfuss, The Age of Wonders, The Story of a Life: A Memoir (2004 Prix Médicis étranger)
  • Sholem Asch, The Nazarine, The Apostle, Three Cities, Salvation, East River
  • Isaac Asimov, I, Robot, Foundation Trilogy
  • Paul Auster, The New York Trilogy, Leviathan (1993 Prix Médicis étranger)
  • Isaac Babel, Red Cavalry, Odessa Tales
  • Giorgio Bassani, The Garden of the Finzi-Continis
  • Vicki Baum, Grand Hotel
  • Saul Bellow, The Adventures of Augie March, Henderson the Rain King, Herzog, Mr. Sammler's Planet, Humboldt's Gift (1976 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction); 1976 Nobel Prize in Literature
  • Henri Bergson, L'Evolution Créatrice (Creative Evolution); 1927 Nobel Prize in Literature
  • Biblical Authors, The Bible (Jewish and Christian Scriptures)
  • Robert Bloch, Psycho
  • Kazimierz Brandys, Samson, Antygona, Troy, Open City, Man Does Not Die
  • Hermann Broch, The Death of Virgil, The Sleepwalkers
  • Max Brod, The Redemption of Tycho Brahe
  • Anita Brookner, Hotel du Lac (1984 Man Booker Prize)
  • Elias Canetti, Auto-da-Fé, Masse und Macht (Crowds and Power), Das Gewissen der Worte (The Conscience of Words); 1981 Nobel Prize in Literature
  • Miguel de Cervantes 2, Don Quixote
  • Michael Chabon, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay (2001 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction)
  • Hélène Cixous, Inside (Dedans, 1969 Prix Médicis)
  • Albert Cohen, Belle du Seigneur
  • Marcia Davenport, The Valley of Decision, Easy Side, West Side
  • Benjamin Disraeli, Sybil, Vivian Grey, Coningsby, Tancred
  • Alfred Döblin, Berlin Alexanderplatz
  • E. L. Doctorow, Ragtime, World's Fair, Billy Bathgate, City of God
  • Sergei Dovlatov 3, The Compromise, The Zone
  • Maurice Druon 4, The Accursed Kings (Les Rois Maudits), Les Grandes Familles (1948 Prix Goncourt)
  • Ilya Ehrenburg,The Ninth Wave, The Storm, The Thaw
  • Harlan Ellison, Dangerous Visions
  • Leslie Epstein, King of the Jews: A Novel of the Holocaust, Goldkorn Tales
  • Edna Ferber, So Big (1925 Pulitzer Prize for the Novel), Show Boat, Cimarron, Saratoga Trunk
  • Lion Feuchtwanger, Jud Süss (Jew Süss: A Historical Romance), Der jüdische Krieg (Josephus), Der Tag wird kommen (The Day Will Come)
  • Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl
  • Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams, Civilization and Its Discontents, Totem and Taboo
  • Romain Gary 5, The Roots of Heaven (1956 Prix Goncourt), The Life Before Us (1975 Prix Goncourt), Forrest of Anger, The Dance of Gengis Cohn
  • Eugenia Ginzburg, Journey Into the Whirlwind
  • Natalia Ginzburg 6, All Our Yesterdays, Voices in the Evening
  • Nadine Gordimer, A World of Strangers, Burger's Daughter, The Conservationist (1974 Man Booker Prize); 1991 Nobel Prize in Literature
  • David Grossman, The Yellow Wind
  • Vasily Grossman, Life and Fate, Forever Flowing
  • Joseph Heller, Catch-22, God Knows (1985 Prix Médicis étranger)
  • Mark Helprin, Winter's Tale, A Soldier of the Great War
  • Stefan Heym, The Crusaders
  • Paul Heyse 7, Children of the World, In Paradise; 1910 Nobel Prize in Literature
  • Laura Z. Hobson, Gentleman's Agreement
  • Roger Ikor, La greffe de printemps, Les eaux mêlées (1955 Prix Goncourt)
  • Ilya Ilf, The Twelve Chairs, The Little Golden Calf
  • Howard Jacobson, Who's Sorry Now?, Kalooki Nights, The Finkler Question (2010 Man Booker Prize)
  • Elfriede Jelinek 8, Women as Lovers, Wonderful, Wonderful Times, The Piano Teacher; 2004 Nobel Prize in Literature
  • Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, In Search of Love and Beauty, Heat and Dust (1975 Man Booker Prize)
  • Erica Jong, Fear of Flying, Inventing Memory: A Novel of Mothers and Daughters
  • Franz Kafka, The Trial, The Castle, Amerika, The Metamorphosis
  • Roger Kahn, The Boys of Summer
  • MacKinlay Kantor 9, Long Remember, Andersonville (1956 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction)
  • Veniamin Kaverin, Two Captains
  • Imre Kertész, Kaddish for a Child Not Born; 2002 Nobel Prize in Literature
  • Joseph Kessel, Bell de jour, Les Captifs, Les Coeurs purs (The Pure of Heart), L'Armée des ombres (Army of Shadows)
  • Danilo Kiš  10, Garden, Ashes, Early Sorrows, Hourglass, The Encyclopedia of the Dead
  • Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon, Arrow in the Blue, The Age of Longing, Insight and Outlook, The Sleepwalkers, The Act of Creation
  • György Konrád, A Feast in the Garden, Homecoming
  • Jerzy Kosinski, The Painted Bird, Being There
  • Judith Krantz, Scruples, Princess Daisy
  • Anna Langfus, Les bagages de sable (The Lost Shore) (1962 Prix Goncourt)
  • Stanislaw Lec, Unkempt Thoughts
  • Stanislaw Lem, Summa Technologiae, Cyberiad, Solaris
  • Carlo Levi, Christ Stopped at Eboli
  • Primo Levi, If This Is a Man, The Periodic Table, If Not Now, When?, The Drowned and the Saved
  • Ira Levin, Rosemary's Baby, The Stepford Wives, The Boys from Brazil
  • Jonathan Littell, Les bienveillantes (The Kindly Ones) (2006 Prix Goncourt)
  • Alison Lurie 11, Foreign Affairs (1985 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction)
  • Arnošt Lustig, Night and Hope, Diamonds in the Night, The Street of Lost Brothers, A Prayer for Catherine Horowitz
  • Norman Mailer, The Naked and the Dead, The Armies of the Night (1969 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction), The Executioner's Song (1980 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction)
  • Bernard Malamud, The Fixer (1967 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), The Natural, The Tenants, The Assistant
  • David Malouf  26, An Imaginary Life , Fly Away Peter, The Great World, Remembering Babylon
  • Nadezhda Mandelstam, Hope Against Hope
  • Norman Manea, On Clowns: The Dictator and the Artist, Compulsory Happiness, The Black Envelope, The Hooligan’s Return (2006 Prix Médicis étranger)
  • Klaus Mann 12, Mephisto, Der Vulkan
  • André Maurois, Les Silences du Colonel Bramble, À La recherche de Marcel Proust, Climats, Le Cercle de famille, Ariel
  • Mendele Moykher Sforim, The Little Man, The Travels and Adventures of Benjamin the Third
  • Daniel Mendelsohn, The Lost (Les Disparus) (2007 Prix Médicis étranger)
  • Steven Millhauser, Edwin Mullhouse (1975 Prix Médicis étranger), Martin Dressler: The Tale of an American Dreamer (1997 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction)
  • Patrick Modiano 13, Missing Person (1978 Prix Goncourt)
  • Michel de Montaigne 14, Essays
  • Elsa Morante 15, La storia, Aracoeli (1984 Prix Médicis étranger)
  • Alberto Moravia 16, Two Women, The Conformist
  • Harry Mulisch 17, The Assault, The Discovery of Heaven, The Procedure
  • Péter Nádas, Parallel Stories: A Novel, The End of a Family Story, A Book of Memories
  • Irène Némirovsky, David Golder, Le Bal, Les mouches d'automne, Le vin de solitude, Les chiens et les loups, Les Biens de ce monde
  • Amos Oz, A Tale of Love and Darkness, My Michael
  • Cynthia Ozick, Art & Ardor, Heir to the Glimmering World, The Puttermesser Papers
  • Dorothy Parker 18, The Collected Dorothy Parker
  • Boris Pasternak, Doctor Zhivago; 1958 Nobel Prize in Literature
  • Georges Perec, La Vie mode d'emploi (Life: A User's Manual) (1978 Prix Médicis)
  • I.L. Peretz, Bontshe the Silent, The Book of Fire: Stories by I.L. Peretz
  • Belva Plain, Evergreen
  • Chaim Potok, In the Beginning, The Chosen
  • Marcel Proust 19, À la Recherche du Temps Perdu (In Search of Lost Time; alternatively translated as Remembrance of Things Past) (1919 Prix Goncourt)
  • Ellery Queen (pseudonym used by Frederic Dannay and Manfred Lee), Ellery Queen mystery novels, anthologies , and magazine
  • Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged, The Fountainhead, We the Living
  • Mordecai Richler, The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz
  • Harold Robbins, The Carpetbaggers
  • Fernando de Rojas, La Celestina
  • Henry Roth, Call It Sleep
  • Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March, Job
  • Philip Roth, Portnoy's Complaint, Goodbye Columbus, American Pastoral (1998 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), The Human Stain (2002 Prix Médicis étranger)
  • Bernice Rubens, Madame Sousatzka, The Elected Member (1970 Man Booker Prize), A Solitary Grief
  • Anatoly Rybakov, Children of the Arbat, Heavy Sand
  • Carl Sagan, The Dragons of Eden (1978 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction)
  • J. D. Salinger 20, The Catcher in the Rye
  • Nathalie Sarraute, Tropismes, The Planetarium, The Age of Suspicion, The Golden Fruits, Between Life and Death
  • Budd Schulberg, What Makes Sammy Run?
  • Bruno Schulz, The Street of Crocodiles, Sanatorium under the Sign of the Hourglass
  • André Schwarz-Bart, Le Dernier des Justes (The Last of the Just) (1959 Prix Goncourt)
  • Erich Segal, Love Story
  • Anna Seghers, The Seventh Cross
  • Meir Shalev, TheBlue Mountain, Esau, The Loves of Judith
  • Irwin Shaw, Rich Man, Poor Man, The Young Lions
  • Sidney Sheldon, The Other Side of Midnight, Rage of Angels
  • Sholem Aleichem, Tevye the Dairyman and Other Stories, Some Laughter, Some Tears: Tales From the Old World and the New
  • Isaac Bashevis Singer, The Magician of Lublin, Enemies: A Love Story, Satan in Goray, The Family Moskat, The Slave; 1978 Nobel Prize in Literature
  • Muriel Spark 21, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie
  • Manès Sperber, Burned Bramble, All Our Yesterdays
  • Art Spiegelman, Maus (1992 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction)
  • Danielle Steel 22, Best-selling romance novels (more than 500 million copies sold)
  • Gertrude Stein, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas
  • Milton Steinberg, As a Driven Leaf
  • George Steiner, The Portage to San Cristóbal of A.H.
  • Irving Stone, The Agony and the Ecstasy, Lust for Life
  • Arkady and Boris Strugatsky 23, Roadside Picnic, Monday Begins on Saturday
  • Jacqueline Susann, Valley of the Dolls
  • Italo Svevo, The Confessions of Zeno
  • Alvin Toffler, Future Shock
  • Yuri Trifonov 24, House on the Enbankment
  • Elsa Triolet, A Fine of 200 Francs (1944 Prix Goncourt)
  • Barbara Tuchman, The Guns of August (1963 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction)
  • Scott Turow, Presumed Innocent, Burden of Proof, The Laws of Our Fathers, Reversible Errors, Ordinary Heroes
  • Lyudmila Ulitskaya, Sonechka (1996 Prix Médicis étranger), Kukotsky's Case
  • Leon Uris, Exodus, Mila 18
  • Vladimir Voinovich 25, The Life and Extraordinary Adventures of Private Ivan Chonkin
  • Irving Wallace, The Prize
  • Edward Wallant, The Pawnbroker, The Human Season
  • Jerome Weidman, I Can Get It for You Wholesale
  • Franz Werfel, The Forty Days of Musa Dagh, The Song of Bernadette
  • Nathanael West, Miss Lonelyhearts, The Day of the Locust, A Cool Million
  • Elie Wiesel, Night, Dawn, The Accident, The Gates of the Forrest,  A Beggar in Jerusalem (Le Mendiant de Jérusalem, 1968 Prix Médicis), All Rivers Run to the Sea: Memoirs, And the Sea is Never Full: Memoirs; 1986 Nobel Peace Prize
  • Herman Wouk, The Caine Mutiny (1952 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), The Winds of War, War and Remembrance, This is My God
  • A. B. Yehoshua, A Late Divorce, Five Seasons, Mr. Mani
  • Israel Zangwill, Children of the Ghetto
  • Arnold Zweig, The Case of Sergeant Grischa
  • Stefan Zweig, Amok, The Royal Game, The World of Yesterday

NOTES
1. Jewish mother (Eugenia Ginzburg), non-Jewish father.
2. See, e.g., The Cambridge Companion to Cervantes, edited by Anthony Cascardi (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2002, p.4). Writing of Cervantes' parents Rodrigo de Cervantes and Leonor de Cortinas, Cascardi states in the Introduction: "While the family may have had some claim to nobility they often found themselves in financial straits.  Moreover, they were almost certainly of converso origin, that is, converts to Catholicism of Jewish ancestry."
3. Jewish father, non-Jewish mother.
4. Jewish father (Lazare Kessel, the brother of novelist Joseph Kessel).
5. Although born Roman Kacew to a Jewish couple, Nina and Leyba Kacew (who separated shortly after his birth), Gary claimed that he "never knew with any certainty who his father was"; see Romain Gary: The Man Who Sold His Shadow, by Ralph Schoolcraft (University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 2002, pp. 1, 48).

6. Jewish father, non-Jewish mother.
7. Jewish mother, non-Jewish father.
8. Jewish father, non-Jewish mother.
9. Born Benjamin MacKinlay Kantor to a Jewish father and a non-Jewish mother. See My Father's Voice: MacKinlay Kantor Long Remembered, by Tim Kantor (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1988, pp. 28-29, 40, 48-49, 92).
10. Jewish father, non-Jewish mother.
11. Jewish father, non-Jewish mother.
12.
Jewish mother, non-Jewish father.
13.
Jewish father, non-Jewish mother.
14. According to both Donald Frame in Montaigne, a biography  (Hamilton, London, 1965, pp. 16-28) and Cecil Roth in "The Jewish Ancestry of Michel de Montaigne" [Chapter 14 of Personalities and Events in Jewish History  (Jewish Publication Society of America, Philadelphia, 1953, pp. 212-225)], Montaigne's maternal grandfather was a Jewish converso; however, Montaigne's maternal grandmother came from an "Old Christian" (i.e., non-converso) family, as did his father.
15. Jewish mother, non-Jewish father.
16. Jewish father, non-Jewish mother.
17.
Jewish mother, non-Jewish father.
18.
Jewish father, non-Jewish mother.
19. Jewish mother, non-Jewish father.
20. Jewish father, non-Jewish mother; raised Jewish.
21. Jewish father, mother of partial Jewish descent.  Although Spark had always maintained that, of her mother's antecedents, only her mother's maternal grandfather was Jewish, documents in the possession of the office of the Chief Rabbi in London indicate that both of her mother's maternal grandparents were Jewish, which is consistent with her grandmother having been buried in the Jewish section of the Piershill Cemetery in Edinburgh.  In 1998, Spark conceded that "it's quite possible that Adelaide [her maternal grandmother] was born a Jew, that I got it wrong."  See 15 April 1998 article "Document sparks family feud over writer's Jewish origins," by Dean Nelson in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
22. Jewish father, non-Jewish mother.
23. Jewish father, non-Jewish mother; see final paragraph of http://www.abstrugatskie.ru/strug_famil/.
24. Jewish mother, non-Jewish father.
25. Jewish mother, non-Jewish father.
26. Jewish mother, non-Jewish father.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 4625
RIP
Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 14 2014 10:59 AM

Peace to all!                        A Gigantic Thank You to Rosie and MJ for your incredible understanding and Support!                        Actually, I thank my God for you and ask Eternal Blessings for you!                    *smile*

It will indeed take me a long, long time to "digest" your present "sharings"!     *smile*

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 19192
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 14 2014 2:02 PM

Rosie Perera:
I did a Google search for "1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die" xlsx and I found this link to a spreadsheet

Incidentally, since there are two columns in this spreadsheet for marking x's, and they both work for all the books whether or not they appear in that edition, it could be used this way: in column A mark an x if you've read the book, in column C mark an x if you actually have heard of the book and want to read it. Then you can add a cell that has a formula showing you the percentage of books you've read of the ones you actually care to read that are on the list. So far I have only heard of one of the first 75 books on the list, and I'm pretty literate, have read widely, and know lots of titles of great books I've not yet read (we had to memorize long lists of book titles and their authors' names for quiz team in high school, so I know all the classic books I should have read by now in my life).

Does it count if I've only heard of the title because I've heard of the movie it was evidently made into?

I finished going through the list and ended up recognizing 263 books and have read 52 of them. And I was surprised at the number of omissions that should be on anyone's "books to read in a lifetime" list. It appears that this list is skewed towards mid-20th century and later.

Finally, here are some canonical lists of great books:

http://reocities.com/unmark/books.html 

Posts 4625
RIP
Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 14 2014 2:09 PM

Rosie!              Wow!                 I am indeed QUITE overwhelmed by all of the "considerations" of the last couple of days!      am looking forward to studying the canonical lists you've sent and working in this area!                           Wonderfully "overwhelmed"!     That is!         *smile*

                          Thanks so very much!             !!!

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 31946
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 14 2014 4:27 PM

Rosie Perera:
I finished going through the list and ended up recognizing 263 books and have read 52 of them.

One book I read 59 years ago when I inherited my grandfather's copy - one I may have read a year before that. We won't try to count the times I thought "I've read nearly everything by this author - but I'm not sure if I've read this title. A few were "oh yes, that's the title I was looking for"... I wish the creator had kept up with the subsequent years of the survey.

Rosie Perera:
Does it count if I've only heard of the title because I've heard of the movie it was evidently made into?

Not as much as if you've read the Classics Illustrated version.Wink

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 1792
Ken McGuire | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 14 2014 6:07 PM

MJ. Smith:
Milford, here is my list of books that provoke interesting discussions for a Christian book club

Interesting list - and of course a list like this can grow almost(?) exponentially...  But that said, I would like to add a few:

1) Silence by Shusato Endo

2) The Hammer of God by Bo Giertz

3) The Rabbit Series by John Updike

4) Roget's Version by John Updike

The Gospel is not ... a "new law," on the contrary, ... a "new life." - William Julius Mann

L8 Anglican, Lutheran and Orthodox Silver, Reformed Starter, Academic Essentials

L7 Lutheran Gold, Anglican Bronze

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