Bible commentaries

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Tim | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Apr 14 2014 2:17 AM

Hello everyone,

I want to buy a full Bible commentary and I'd appreciate to have help from you all. I checked a site called "bestcommentaries" and that showed me a look around.

In fact, I'm a student of theology and I'm interested in languages, exegetic, good establishment of the text,... For example, I don't like NICOT because it doesn't have any establishment of the text... And I like to compare the versions LXX-Vulgate-MassoreticText for the OT and the manuscripts for the NT.

I know WBC and found that they are good and technical but the textual notes are really short. Then, I know also AB and there, I've found great textual notes but the commentaries on the text are not so good (and the site "bestcommentaries" doesn't seem to like them !). What would be the best combination according to you ?

Thanks,

Tim.

Posts 1792
Ken McGuire | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 14 2014 3:50 AM

Since you are a student, I strongly recommend that you ask your professors what commentaries would be helpful in your studies and also walk to the reference library and compare them on specific texts.

The Bestcommentaries site shows how much generally evangelical pastors like certain commentaries - useful info, but there are other communities of users out there too.  Unfortunately, with some exceptions, most commentaries are weak/pedestrian in text criticism....

But with your academic interests, you would probably find the more technical series more interesting.  WBC has good bibliographies, is reasonably up to date, and fairly complete.  But there are other ones too.  ICC has many older, classic works, and is slowly updating with new volumes - most of which are quite good.  Anchor-Yale seems to be transitioning towards technical - and the volume on 1 Samuel digs into the text criticism issues, but some of the older volumes are weak or just plain odd.  Hermeneia is a mixture of translations of European works as well as new ones written explicitly for it.  Continental Commentaries are translations of generally German technical works.  New International Greek Testament Commentary has many good works too.

You mentioned that you didn't like NICOT.  You may want to look at Gordon Fee's volumes in NICNT though, since he does cover textual issues  - at least as well as the format allows....

SDG

Ken McGuire

The Gospel is not ... a "new law," on the contrary, ... a "new life." - William Julius Mann

L8 Anglican, Lutheran and Orthodox Silver, Reformed Starter, Academic Essentials

L7 Lutheran Gold, Anglican Bronze

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Mike Childs | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 14 2014 7:11 AM

You may want to check the newer ICC volumes.  They may be more what you are looking for; however, the older volumes are somewhat dated.  I particularly like the Matthew volumes, the Romans volumes, the Pastoral, and Acts.

"In all cases, the Church is to be judged by the Scripture, not the Scripture by the Church," John Wesley

Posts 11433
DMB | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 14 2014 7:43 AM

I suspect you're dreaming (though your sentences do appear to be real)!

There's no such animal; you have to do it the hard way.  Which is what I do.  I do have WBC, Hermeneia, AYB, Cambridge, etc. But what you're wanting is pieces slowly discovered over time.  And so I've purchased as much of the underlying text as Logos provides (which is surprisingly quite a bit), and then purchase subject-specific books that discuss the text. 

So, for the OT, I have the MT of course, Gottingen, Peshitta, Vulgate (but Logos doesn't have anything latin before Jerome-ish), Philo quotes, Coptic prophets quotes, Dead Sea Scrolls (which don't have a lot), Targums (of unknown dating), and Mishnah/Talmud.  Logos has a bit to go on expansion in the latter area.  Plus I added quite a bit in Ugarit, Aramea/Assyria due to the similarities of language/imagery. My next expansion area is in hebrew poetics which is probably the most complex.

On the NT side, Logos is pretty much a desert, text-wise.  Some papyri, some text forms, a few introductory volumes and then you jump to 'theological text'.  Logos' NT experts don't hold a candle to its OT experts.  But that's understandable since Logos is mainly targeted to the jewish customer segment, adding a few Christian volumes here and there.

But frankly, you're likely to end up where I did; you might has well get busy.

"God will save his fallen angels and their broken wings He'll mend."

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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 14 2014 9:10 AM

Denise:
But frankly, you're likely to end up where I did; you might has well get busy.

And it won't happen overnight.

Logos 7 Collectors Edition

Posts 2964
tom | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 14 2014 9:32 AM

Ken McGuire:

Since you are a student, I strongly recommend that you ask your professors what commentaries would be helpful in your studies and also walk to the reference library and compare them on specific texts.

The Bestcommentaries site shows how much generally evangelical pastors like certain commentaries - useful info, but there are other communities of users out there too.  Unfortunately, with some exceptions, most commentaries are weak/pedestrian in text criticism....

Yes

And as Denise implied, Hermeneia is also a good technical commentary.  Let us say that I used it more (I used it a lot) in seminary than I do post seminary. 

Posts 5317
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 14 2014 10:07 AM

While not giving you all your needs, New Interpreter's Bible (12 vols.) is my favourite one and worth a look. the link below has samples from every book of the Bible.

-Dan

https://www.evernote.com/pub/danielwilliamfrancis/nibsamples#b=0143a7fd-3bd0-4b2c-957e-61b6b4b06b64&st=p&n=8d3c1af5-90c7-40d4-a724-beb08cba5417

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