Where is Jesus in the Book of Job?

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Posts 87
Pinoy Preacher | Forum Activity | Posted: Sun, Apr 27 2014 11:56 PM

Is there any resource that would help to enlighten us in the topic of Jesus as present in the Book of Job whether symbolically or typologically?

Posts 4842
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 12:29 AM

I don't mean this in a bad way...but can't you try finding Him yourself?

Posts 18857
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 12:30 AM

I've done a search for <Job> in my "Christ in the OT" collection, and these books come up with significant hits:

Posts 1875
Paul-C | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 1:29 AM

Rosie Perera:

For those who have the Spurgeon sermon collection, I created the table of contents for the above work with links to the relevant sermons here (since this volume is essentially a collection of Spurgeon's sermons from his greater collection):

http://community.logos.com/forums/t/83222.aspx 

The sermons referenced in this work for the book of Job are:

Footsteps of Mercy

 

Job xxxiii. 23, 24.

I Know That My Redeemer Liveth

 

Job xix. 25-27.

Posts 3
LJ | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 3:11 AM

The Message of Job from the Bible Speaks Today series finds all sorts of connections between Jesus and Job. I don't fully agree with all the connections but you might want to consider it. I don't believe its in Logos however.

Another one is Crying Out for Vindication: The Gospel According to Job by David Jackson. However it is still on pre-pub and part of a bundle.

Good luck kapatid!!

Posts 18857
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 3:42 AM

LJ:
Another one is Crying Out for Vindication: The Gospel According to Job by David Jackson. However it is still on pre-pub and part of a bundle.

Oh, good find! I'm in on that pre-pub and can't wait for it.

Posts 890
Brother Mark | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 6:05 AM

May I suggest two searches that yield interesting results for me:

1. A Basic search of your entire library of "Theophany NEAR Job" (without the quotes)

2.  A google search of "Jesus in the book of Job"

"I read dead people..."

Posts 1674
Paul Golder | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 6:59 AM

Recommended:

Christ in the Old Testament by James A. Borland

"As any translator will attest, a literal translation is no translation at all."

Posts 309
Lonnie Spencer | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 6:59 AM

Logos has this book: "To understand the Bible Look for Jesus: The Bible Student's Guide to Bible's Central Theme" by Norman Geisler

Below is the short article in the book on Job that might give you a starting point for further study

job: aspiration for mediation by Christ

Job desired someone who "would maintain the right of a man with God" (16:21). His longing was for someone to be a mediator "who might lay his hand upon both" God and man (9:33). He asked if there was any significance to suffering, any purpose to pain, or any meaning to human misery. What Job did not recognize in the depth of his despair was that whatever happens on the scene (chaps. 3–41) can only be fully understood in the light of what takes place behind the scene (chaps. 1–2), where the accuser of the brethren accuses them day and night before God, and in view of what will be their reward beyond the scene (chap. 42). Furthermore, what Job desired, without fully understanding, was the Advocate (1 John 2:1) or High Priest who could "sympathize with our weaknesses" (Heb. 4:15). He did not realize that the significance of suffering was to be found in the substitution of the Saviour who suffered "the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God" (1 Peter 3:18). In short, what Job really desired was the "one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus" (1 Tim. 2:5)

Geisler, N. L. (1979). To Understand the Bible Look for Jesus: The Bible Student’s Guide to the Bible's Central Theme. Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock Publishers.

You might also want to look in "Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament" with a search Jesus NEAR Job

-Lonnie S.

.

Posts 10638
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 7:21 AM

Actually, Mr Paul, Job is the 'evidence par excellence' that Jesus was an aramaic scholar (in contrast to his judaistic counterparts down south, that jumped the tracks crossing the north Tigress centuries earlier).

"I didn't know God made honky tonk angels."

Posts 5270
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 11:15 AM

Although Job’s message was originally proclaimed centuries ago, it is a message that continues to fit the conditions of mankind. We can benefit from reading and rereading this book.
Ever since our first parents fell into sin in the Garden of Eden, sin has been very much a part of our experiences. Sin has brought with it many consequences: misunderstandings, troubles, grief, pain, sickness, death. All of us as sinners are inclined to be judgmental and to point a finger at others as did the three friends of Job. Like them, we may be tempted to draw the conclusion that great suffering is a direct consequence of some special sin, which is not necessarily the case. All of us are tempted to make ourselves look better by making others look worse. While it is often true that a person who commits a certain sin may have to suffer the consequences (for example, a drunken driver who has an accident and maims or kills himself), it is also true that God uses troubles and afflictions to test and strengthen the faith of a Christian. That was pointed out by the young man Elihu, who spoke after Job’s other three friends had stopped speaking. We will note this in our comments on chapter 33.
For Christians today as well as for Old Testament believers, the afflictions that God permits us to endure are not punishment but wholesome chastisement, a disciplining exercise to strengthen our faith.
In this volume of The People’s Bible, we will attempt to show that there is much more to the book of Job than the story of a good man who suffered many things and was engaged in a prolonged dialogue with three friends who actually did more harm than good in their attempts to comfort him. This book also has a messianic content, in a number of passages that point to the coming Savior, Jesus Christ. The most notable of these is the great “Redeemer” passage (19:23–27), but there are also other passages that point forward to our Savior. We will note them as they appear in this commentary.
The book of Job, as does all of the Old Testament, points forward to Jesus Christ, who not only frequently quoted from the Old Testament but also stated that those Scriptures testified about him (John 5:39). Apart from God’s love for us in Jesus Christ, we will be unable to grasp the real message of this book. Franz Delitzsch is not guilty of overstating the case when he writes, “The real contents of the book of Job is the mystery of the Cross: the Cross on Golgotha is the solution of the enigma of every cross; and the book of Job is a prophecy of this final solution” (page 32).
It is our hope and prayer that God the Holy Spirit will work in our hearts as we read this precious book, a book that is not read as thoroughly or as frequently as it deserves. The apostle Paul’s words about the Old Testament are true also of the book of Job: “Everything that was written in the past was written to teach us, so that through endurance and the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have hope” (Romans 15:4).


Rudolph E. Honsey, Job (The People’s Bible; Milwaukee, WI: Northwestern Pub. House, 200AD), 8–9.

Posts 6884
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 11:25 AM

Here's the Spanish version of The Peoples Bible Wink


Aunque el mensaje del libro de Job fue proclamado por primera vez hace muchos siglos, su mensaje sigue siendo apropiado para la humanidad de hoy en día. Podemos obtener gran beneficio al volver a leer este libro.
Desde la caída de nuestros primeros padres en pecado en el Huerto del Edén, el pecado ha sido una parte constante de nuestra existencia. Ha traído muchas consecuencias: malentendidos, tribulación, pena, dolor, enfermedad, y muerte. Todos nosotros, como pecadores que somos, estamos inclinados a juzgar y a levantar un dedo acusador en contra de los demás, tal como lo hicieron los tres amigos de Job. Como ellos, nosotros también podemos tener la tentación de llegar a la conclusión de que los grandes sufrimientos que padece una persona son la consecuencia directa de algún pecado especial, lo que no es necesariamente cierto. Todos nosotros estamos tentados a aparentar que somos mejores de lo que realmente somos, a costa de los demás. Aunque con frecuencia es cierto que una persona que cometió cierto pecado tiene que sufrir las consecuencias (por ejemplo, un conductor ebrio que tiene un accidente y se lastima o se mata al chocar su automóvil), también es cierto que Dios usa los problemas y las aflicciones para probar y fortalecer la fe del cristiano, así lo señaló el joven Eliú, que habló después de que los otros tres amigos de Job se habían callado. Vamos a hablar más sobre este punto en los comentarios del capítulo 33.
Para los cristianos hoy en día, como lo fue para los creyentes del Antiguo testamento, las aflicciones que el Señor permite que entren en nuestra vida no son castigo de Dios sino disciplina, una disciplina que hace que nuestra fe se fortalezca.
En este volumen de la Biblia Popular intentaremos mostrar que en el libro de Job hay mucho más que la historia de un buen hombre que sufre muchas aflicciones y que se comprometió en un prolongado diálogo con tres amigos, que realmente le hicieron más mal que bien en el intento de consolarlo. Este libro también tiene un contenido mesiánico en varios pasajes, que señalan la venida del Salvador, nuestro Señor Jesucristo. El pasaje más destacado de estos es el del gran “Redentor” (19:23–27), pero también hay otros pasajes que señalan a nuestro Salvador. Los destacaremos a medida que aparezcan en este comentario.
El libro de Job, como lo hace todo el Antiguo Testamento, señala hacia Jesucristo, quien no sólo citó con frecuencia el Antiguo Testamento sino que también dijo claramente que las Escrituras dan testimonio de él (vea Juan 5:39). Aparte del amor de Dios por nosotros en Jesucristo, seríamos incapaces de captar el verdadero mensaje de este libro. Franz Delitzsch no comete ninguna exageración cuando escribe: “El verdadero contenido del libro de Job es el misterio de la cruz; la cruz en el Gólgota es la solución al enigma de cada cruz; y el libro de Job es una profecía de este desenlace final” (p. 32).
Son nuestra esperanza y nuestra oración, que Dios el Espíritu Santo obre en nuestro corazón a medida que leamos este precioso libro, un libro que nunca se lee tan completamente ni con la frecuencia con que merece ser leído. Las palabras que nos dejó el apóstol Pablo acera del Antiguo Testamento también son ciertas respecto al libro de Job; “Las cosas que se escribieron antes, para nuestra enseñanza se escribieron, a fin que, por la paciencia y la consolación de las escrituras, tengamos esperanza” (Romanos 15:4).


Honsey, R. E. (1996). Job. (R. C. Ehlke & J. C. Jeske, Eds.) (pp. 8–9). Milwaukee, WI: Editorial Northwestern.

Posts 1738
Robert M. Warren | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 11:40 AM

On the lighter side, I once heard a recorded sermon about Jesus and healing where the pastor cited Job 41:22 (KJV), exclaiming "People, He turns your sorrow into joy!"

Here's the verse, which is actually about Leviathan:

22  In his neck remaineth strength,

And sorrow is turned into joy before him.

Maybe it's not the lighter side.

Posts 4842
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 11:59 AM

Robert M. Warren:

On the lighter side, I once heard a recorded sermon about Jesus and healing where the pastor cited Job 41:22 (KJV), exclaiming "People, He turns your sorrow into joy!"

Here's the verse, which is actually about Leviathan:

22  In his neck remaineth strength,

And sorrow is turned into joy before him.

Maybe it's not the lighter side.

Not saying the KJV is entirely wrong, but that is a verse it doesn't hurt to read in a newer version.

Posts 1674
Paul Golder | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 12:12 PM

David Paul:
Not saying the KJV is entirely wrong...

"As any translator will attest, a literal translation is no translation at all."

Posts 10638
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 12:26 PM

Well, leviathan clearly scared the scholarly stuffing out of the translators of Job 41:25 (MT v17).  The LXX guys especially wanted to make sure we're talking 4-FOOTED beast (no angels wings, no 'up-there'). The NRSV guys apparently were not amused.

"I didn't know God made honky tonk angels."

Posts 4842
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 12:32 PM

Dan Francis:

Franz Delitzsch is not guilty of overstating the case when he writes, “The real contents of the book of Job is the mystery of the Cross: the Cross on Golgotha is the solution of the enigma of every cross; and the book of Job is a prophecy of this final solution” (page 32).

Wow!! Now there is an example of a man stumbling into a word of prophecy and not even being capable of comprehending what he was saying.

Sensus plenior, indeed!!

Posts 4842
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 28 2014 12:50 PM

Paul Golder:

David Paul:
Not saying the KJV is entirely wrong...

Wink

Posts 87
Pinoy Preacher | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 29 2014 4:09 AM

At everyone who suggested some resources in one way or another, thank you very much. You are very helpful. Yes

I do hope that Logos will make Crying Out for Vindication: The Gospel According to Job available as a single resource. I don't even see it in Kindle format @ Amazon...

Posts 1875
Paul-C | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 29 2014 4:36 AM

Rosie Perera:

This book is available for purchase individually here: https://www.logos.com/product/16590/discovering-christ-in-all-the-scriptures 

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