ON SALE: Boice’s Expositional Commentaries

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Posts 2263
Lee | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, Jul 2 2014 5:43 AM

The 27-volume set of Boice’s Expositional Commentaries is going for under $100.

Details here.

Posts 1458
John Kight | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 2 2014 6:41 AM

I missed out last time this was on sale for $99. Sadly, I think I will be forced to miss out again due to my current finacial situation. Maybe next time...Sad

For book reviews and more visit sojotheo.com 

Posts 57
William | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 2 2014 7:05 AM

Had this phone conversation with me wife this morning:

Me:  I know I have spent all my allowance on Logos but Boice Commentaries is on sale for $100 and the regular price is $400.  This has been in my wish list forever, so I need permission to buy.

Her:  Who's Boice and what wish list?

Her again: Never mind, it's sound like a great deal, go ahead and get it.  Oh did I mention my food processor is dying?

So today I snagged Boice's Commentary and I assume a new food processor at the same time. :)

Posts 2263
Lee | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 2 2014 7:10 AM

I had my struggles too. But I read Boice many years ago, and found his stuff to be good. As non-technical commentaries go, his work is solid.

Posts 2618
Erwin Stull, Sr. | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 2 2014 7:27 AM

William:

Had this phone conversation with me wife this morning:

Me:  I know I have spent all my allowance on Logos but Boice Commentaries is on sale for $100 and the regular price is $400.  This has been in my wish list forever, so I need permission to buy.

Her:  Who's Boice and what wish list?

Her again: Never mind, it's sound like a great deal, go ahead and get it.  Oh did I mention my food processor is dying?

So today I snagged Boice's Commentary and I assume a new food processor at the same time. :)

Ha Ha Ha Ha... I think all wives go to this secret school called "The School of Wifeology". Smile

Posts 8050
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Bruce Dunning | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 2 2014 8:27 AM

William:

Had this phone conversation with me wife this morning:

Me:  I know I have spent all my allowance on Logos but Boice Commentaries is on sale for $100 and the regular price is $400.  This has been in my wish list forever, so I need permission to buy.

Her:  Who's Boice and what wish list?

Her again: Never mind, it's sound like a great deal, go ahead and get it.  Oh did I mention my food processor is dying?

So today I snagged Boice's Commentary and I assume a new food processor at the same time. :)

Your post made me laugh. I can totally relate! I hope you get a nice food processor! Wink

Using adventure and community to challenge young people to continually say "yes" to God

Posts 588
Kevin A Lewis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 2 2014 8:40 AM

I'm sure the commentaries will outlast the food processor though!

And hopefully give eternal value

Shalom

Posts 184
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Dan Pritchett | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 2 2014 6:57 PM

William:

Had this phone conversation with me wife this morning:

Me:  I know I have spent all my allowance on Logos but Boice Commentaries is on sale for $100 and the regular price is $400.  This has been in my wish list forever, so I need permission to buy.

Her:  Who's Boice and what wish list?

Sounds like a perfect time to get on board with https://www.logos.com/book-cache so you'll never have an unexpected emergency again. It'll be there when you need it.  Smile

Posts 1691
JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 2 2014 7:03 PM

anyone know if he is a calvinist or not?

Posts 423
Nord Zootman | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 2 2014 7:13 PM

JoshInRI:

anyone know if he is a calvinist or not?

Yes he was.

Posts 2041
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 2 2014 11:11 PM

I'm not much on expositional commentaries, but I'm real tempted. Boice held the pulpit of his church for more than thirty years and his predecessor was Donald Grey Barnhouse who served roughly the same duration. 

The aim is never to become a master of the Word, but to be mastered by it. D.A. Carson | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

Posts 4426
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 2 2014 11:58 PM

I'm just waiting for my sales guy to come back from vacation. I am wondering though, does anyone know if the July 4th sale is going to count as the July monthly sale?

Posts 1033
Lee | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 3 2014 5:07 AM

Big Smile

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2015 rMBP 15" 2.2GHz 16GB 256GB SSD, running macOS Sierra   Galaxy Tab 3,   Galaxy S5.

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Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 3 2014 9:48 AM

I only own the Psalms but find them quite nice... I thought I would share, PSALM 131, since it is a short Psalm.

-Dan

Psalm 131


Like a Satisfied Child


My heart is not proud, O LORD,
my eyes are not haughty;
I do not concern myself with great matters
or things too wonderful for me.
But I have stilled and quieted my soul;
like a weaned child with its mother,
like a weaned child is my soul within me.

O Israel, put your hope in the LORD
both now and forevermore.

verses 1–3

It is hard to imagine anyone spending three years with Jesus Christ and still wanting to be important himself, instead of just letting Jesus be important. But the disciples did, and we do too, even after years of exposure to Jesus’ teachings.
Matthew tells us something along these lines that happened soon after Jesus’ transfiguration. The Lord was healing the sick and teaching, attracting so much attention that the disciples were impressed with themselves just for hanging around with him. They were sure Jesus was going to set up his kingdom very quickly, so they began to wonder which of them would have the most important position in it. They asked him, “Who is greatest in the kingdom of heaven?” (Matt. 18:1). I do not know what kind of answer they expected, but I know that the answer they got was not what they expected. Jesus called a little child and had him stand among them. Then he said, “I tell you the truth, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Therefore, whoever humbles himself like this child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven” (vv. 3–4).
It was a serious answer. In order to be saved from sin and enter God’s kingdom, they had to become like little children, and in order to become like children they had to change, humbling themselves instead of jockeying for “top dog” position.


An Easy Psalm with a Hard Lesson

The person who wrote Psalm 131 had learned that lesson and had changed. In fact, his psalm is a record of what happened and a testimony of the point to which he came when he wrote it. It is a short psalm, only nine lines in three verses, one of the easiest of all psalms to read, but its lesson is one of the hardest to learn. Spurgeon said that it is “a short ladder” yet one that “rises to a great height.”
The heading identifies this as another psalm of David. There are four of David’s psalms among the Songs of Ascents (Psalms 122, 124, 131, 133), and this is the third. Many scholars, including a large majority of modern ones, do not want to acknowledge David as the author because they consider this specific collection (Psalms 120–34) to have been written after the exile. Yet it is like David in its content and tone, being a humble composition and using humble metaphors. The same writer who compared himself to a sheep under the care of its divine shepherd earlier (Psalms 23) here easily compares himself to a child in its mother’s arms.
Franz Delitzsch is one of the best older conservative commentators on the psalms. He thought a later author, not David, wrote Psalm 131 as an intended echo of David’s reply to his wife Michal in the incident described in 2 Samuel 6:16–23. When the ark of God was brought to Jerusalem David was so joyful that he danced in the procession dressed only in a common priestly ephod, rather than proceeding in a stately manner clad in his royal robes. Michal despised him for it and called him “a vulgar fellow.” But David replied, “I will become even more undignified than this, and I will be humiliated in my own eyes” (2 Sam. 6:22). David was not a person to stand on his honor. He was willing to humble himself (and did humble himself), because he knew that at best he was merely an unprofitable servant of the only true and ever-to-be-exalted Most High God.
If this psalm is by David, why should it appear here among the Songs of Ascents, especially since it does not have any obvious connection with Jerusalem or with those who were on a pilgrimage to it? The best answer seems to be because it follows the previous psalm so naturally. Psalm 130 was about the grace of God in salvation, a grace manifested apart from any human works. This psalm is about humble trust in God, which should follow for those who have been saved. In this sense, it is a pilgrim psalm after all, but the pilgrimage involved is now a spiritual journey in grace.
There are two other links between Psalms 131 and 130. First, both end the same way, telling Israel, “Put your hope in the LORD” (Pss. 130:7; 131:3). Second, the words of personal testimony at the emotional center of each psalm are alike in substance and in form. In each case the line that embodies the psalm’s most powerful image is repeated for emphasis and effect. Thus in Psalm 130:6 we read:

My soul waits for the Lord
more than watchmen wait for the morning,
more than watchmen wait for the morning.

And in Psalm 131:2 we read:

But I have stilled and quieted my soul;
like a weaned child with its mother,
like a weaned child is my soul within me.

This beautiful portrait of the child with its mother also fits in nicely with the pictures of family blessing developed in Psalms 127 and 128.


The Self-Sufficient Self

Psalm 131 is a personal testimony, as I said earlier, and one part of it is its acknowledgment of what David was or was inclined to be before God changed him and he learned to be satisfied with God alone. He speaks of these things negatively in verse 1, saying what he is not like now because of God’s grace. He must have been inclined to these things once, which is why he is rejecting them.
1. Pride: “My heart is not proud.” We do not normally think of David as being prideful, and if he was, he certainly mastered this vice early since he was known for his humility later on. Yet David’s success in life must have tempted him to be prideful, and it may be that he was inclined to be just a bit conceited in his youth.
There is a suggestion of this possibility in something that happened when his father, Jesse, sent him to his brothers, who were in the Jewish army being threatened by Goliath, the Philistine giant and champion. David was appalled that Goliath should be allowed to defy the armies of the living God, and he expressed his indignation to the soldiers. Eliab, his oldest brother, heard what he was saying and grew angry. “Why did you come down here?” he demanded. “And with whom did you leave those few sheep in the desert? I know how conceited you are and how wicked your heart is; you came down only to watch the battle” (1 Sam. 17:28).
Eliab’s accusation was not entirely true. David had been sent to the army by his father; he had not come just to watch the battle. Moreover, we detect a note of jealousy in Eliab’s words; he was afraid of Goliath after all, while David was not. Yet family members usually know us and have a way of putting their finger on our deepest flaws, and it may be the case that Eliab also had it right when he accused David of conceit. David was an extraordinary man. It would be a miracle if he were not somewhat impressed with his own unusual abilities—at least when he was a young man.
But David had learned to subdue pride, which is what he claims in verse 1. What is remarkable here is that he is able to claim this with humility, there being no hint of the Pharisee in what he says.
Learning to subdue pride is the most important of all lessons in Christian character, since pride is the most serious and pervasive of all vices. Therefore, the Bible has much to say about humility. Just a few psalms later we read,

Though the LORD is on high, he looks upon the lowly,
but the proud he knows from afar (Ps. 138:6).

Proverbs 3:34 is a key text: “He mocks proud mockers but gives grace to the humble.” James quotes it in James 4:6: “That is why Scripture says: ‘God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble,’ ” and so does Peter in 1 Peter 5:5: “All of you, clothe yourselves with humility toward one another, because, ‘God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble.’ ” James also writes, “Humble yourselves before the Lord, and he will lift you up” (James 4:10). James must have learned the importance of humility from Jesus, for he would have heard Jesus say, “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls” (Matt. 11:28–29).
Some years ago when the American film star John Wayne had his first operation for cancer, I remember seeing a film clip in which he emerged from the hospital claiming soberly but hopefully, “I licked the big C,” meaning cancer. He hadn’t and later died from it, but I want to suggest that each of us need to “lick the big P,” which is pride. We can do it by doing exactly what Jesus challenged us to do, namely, taking up his yoke and learning from him. Indeed, the closer we get to Jesus the less pride we will have since all true greatness is in him.
2. Arrogance: “my eyes are not haughty.” Arrogance is an expression of pride. It is the proud who are arrogant, but arrogance goes beyond pride in that it is pride looking down on other people. Haughty comes from the word high. David is saying, My eyes are not high (or lifted up). This is a quite different way of lifting up one’s eyes than in Psalm 121:1, which says, “I lift up my eyes to the hills,” meaning that the psalmist is standing below and looking up beyond the hills to God. In Psalm 131 the picture is of a proud person who has moved up to take God’s place, from which he is then able to look down on other people.
There is nothing in the record of David’s life that would lead us to think he was ever really arrogant, but if God delivered him from pride, which he claims, then God must have delivered him from arrogance too. The important thing is that we should not be arrogant, which we will not be only if we learn to humble ourselves under the hand of God. Peter wrote, “Humble yourselves, therefore, under God’s mighty hand, that he may lift you up in due time” (1 Peter 5:6).
3. Ambition: “I do not concern myself with great matters or things too wonderful for me.” Overcoming ambition does not mean that David did not want to achieve anything or that we should be passive, doing nothing. David is rejecting an ambition that goes beyond what God has for him at any time. For example, David allowed God to give him the kingdom of Israel in God’s own time and way, even though the crown had been promised to him years before. David was content to be pursued by Saul for ten years and then to rule over the tiny principality of Hebron for seven more years before eventually becoming ruler of the united kingdom.
In the last chapter I disagreed with Eugene Peterson’s treatment of Psalm 130, but here what Peterson says about ambition, particularly about its being the distinct stumbling block to Christian maturity and growth thrown up by our materialistic western culture, is exactly on target. He calls ambition “aspiration gone crazy.” He doesn’t mean that trying to be your best or working to achieve the most for God and his glory is wrong. It is not wrong; it is right. What is wrong is the ambition to get everything we can get for ourselves, at whatever cost, for our own glory, which is what our civilization fervently teaches us to do.
Peterson says,

It is … difficult to recognize unruly ambition as a sin because it has a kind of superficial relationship to the virtue of aspiration—an impatience with mediocrity, and a dissatisfaction with all things created until we are at home with the Creator, the hopeful striving for the best God has for us—the kind of thing Paul expressed: “I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus” (Phil. 3:14). But if we take the energies that make for aspiration and remove God from the picture, replacing him with our own crudely sketched self-portrait, we end up with arrogance. Robert Browning’s fine line on aspiration, “A man’s reach should exceed his grasp, or what’s a heaven for?” has been distorted to “Reach for the skies and grab everything that isn’t nailed down.” Ambition is aspiration gone crazy. Aspiration is the channeled, creative energy that moves us to grow in Christ, shaping goals in the Spirit. Ambition takes these same energies for growth and development and uses them to make something tawdry and cheap, sweatily knocking together a Babel when we could be vacationing in Eden.

If we are to be true Christians in this area, we must learn to stand against the distorted values of our culture, knowing that character is more important than career, godliness more important than success, and helping others more important than amassing great wealth.
What David seems to be concerned about in this verse is not so much the accomplishment of great deeds, the kind of achievements that usually bring one worldly fame, but rather peering into the hidden purposes of God, which is what the words “great matters” and “things too wonderful for me” usually refer to in the Bible. He is saying he had learned that he did not have to understand everything God was doing in his life or know when he would do it. All he really had to do was trust God.
We also do not have to understand all God is doing in our lives, but we do need to trust him completely. As Deuteronomy 29:29 says, “The secret things belong to the LORD our God, but the things revealed belong to us and to our children forever, that we may follow all the words of this law.” Although we need to learn what God has revealed in the Bible for our instruction and obey it, beyond that what we need is to trust God completely for the wise ordering of our lives.
Anselm, the English monk who lived in the eleventh century, prayed, “I do not seek, O Lord, to penetrate thy depths. I by no means think my intellect equal to them: but I long to understand in some degree thy truth, which my heart believes and loves. For I do not seek to understand that I may believe, but I believe, that I may understand.” Those words “I believe that I may understand” (fides quarens intellectum) were the passion of Anselm’s life. They are the opposite of “aspiration gone crazy.” They are the expression of a Christian in his right mind.


The Trusting, Born-Again Self

Having spoken of the negatives that once frowned on his life in verse 1 (pride, arrogance, and ambition), David turns next to the right, positive attitude, saying in verse 2 that he had learned to trust God completely like a weaned child who has learned to trust his or her mother. It is not unusual in the Bible to find God pictured as a father (see Deut. 1:31; Hosea 11:1–4; Matt. 6:9), but as far as I know, the only other passages that picture God as a mother are toward the end of Isaiah, where God asks,

Can a mother forget the baby at her breast
and have no compassion on the child she has borne?
Though she may forget,
I will not forget you! (Isa. 49:15).

A few chapters later God says,

As a mother comforts her child,
so will I comfort you (Isa. 66:13).

In these passages the emphasis is on God’s determination to remember, care for, and comfort his spiritual children like a mother cares for and comforts the children God has given her. In Psalm 131 the emphasis is on the child, to whom David compares himself. He says that he is “like a weaned child with its mother” (v. 2).
The key word here is “weaned.” This word is one reason I have been writing about the change to which David is testifying and not merely about the virtues of humility and trust, the opposites of pride and ambition. When David says that his soul is “like a weaned child,” he is not saying that he has always been content with God or even merely that he is content with God now. He is reflecting on the difficult weaning process in which a child is broken of its dependence on its mother’s milk and is taught to take other foods instead. Weaning is usually accompanied by resistance and struggle on the child’s part, even by hot tears, angry accusing glances, and fierce temper tantrums, and it is difficult for the mother. But weaning is necessary if the child is to mature. David is saying that he has come through the weaning process and has learned to trust God to care for him and provide for him, not on David’s own terms but on God’s terms.
Before he was weaned, David wanted God only for what he could get from God. After he was weaned, having learned that God loved him and would care for him even if it was not exactly the way he anticipated or most wanted, he came to love God for God himself. That was a better and much more mature relationship. Have you learned to love God for himself and not merely for what you can get from him?


The Lesson to Be Drawn

There are few psalms in the Psalter that are more personal than this. Yet even though David is writing about himself and his own experience of learning to trust and love God, he does not leave the psalm there but instead, at the end of the psalm, looks to those about him, to Israel, and challenges them to learn what he learned and “put [their] hope in God.”

O Israel, put your hope in the LORD
both now and forevermore (v. 3).

Only God is utterly worthy of our hope and will never disappoint us. To know that truth is to be spiritually mature. Sadly many Christians are still infants.


James Montgomery Boice, Psalms 107–150: An Expositional Commentary (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 2005), 1144–1150.

Posts 1691
JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 4 2014 7:30 AM

sweet. sale still going?

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 4 2014 7:35 AM

JoshInRI:

sweet. sale still going?

According to the product page at https://www.logos.com/product/2665/boices-expositional-commentaries 

Posts 4426
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 4 2014 10:11 AM

JoshInRI:

sweet. sale still going?

If you look at the Logos homepage, it is July's top product, thus on sale all month long.

Posts 1691
JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 4 2014 4:35 PM

Not enough books in the series...need fuller set.  Blessings to all who buy whats there.

Sometimes even I look over authors who are Calvinists....though I am not one.

Posts 2041
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 8 2014 7:36 PM

I decided to go for it last night. Roughly the same price as 4 volumes of print commentary on Amazon.But that wasn't the clincher. Boice's exposition clearly came from a deep relationship with the Bible he so dearly loved. Something worth reading and emulating.

The aim is never to become a master of the Word, but to be mastered by it. D.A. Carson | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

Posts 1709
mike | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 8 2014 8:14 PM

$79 if you upgrade with any base package. fyi.

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