deSilva on Hebrews

Page 1 of 1 (5 items)
This post has 4 Replies | 0 Followers

Posts 406
Erik | Forum Activity | Posted: Sun, Sep 7 2014 12:33 PM

Does anyone have both of deSilva's Hebrews volumes and can tell if the shorter Cascade work adds anything to his longer Eerdman's work?

https://www.logos.com/product/29058/the-letter-to-the-hebrews-in-social-scientific-perspective

https://www.logos.com/product/7376/perseverance-in-gratitude-a-socio-rhetorical-commentary-on-the-epistle-to-the-hebrews

Posts 6154
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Sep 7 2014 1:43 PM

I don't own neither one, but after seeing Moo's NICNT volume on Romans and his Encountering the Book of Romans work (shorter version of Romans if you would), usually works by the same author on the same book overlap a lot.  Unless the key lies on the "perspective" he used: one being "social scientific" and the other being "socio rhetorical." Either way, sounds very similar to me.  Maybe others can help.

DAL

Posts 406
Erik | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Sep 7 2014 1:50 PM

DAL:

I don't own neither one, but after seeing Moo's NICNT volume on Romans and his Encountering the Book of Romans work (shorter version of Romans if you would), usually works by the same author on the same book overlap a lot.  Unless the key lies on the "perspective" he used: one being "social scientific" and the other being "socio rhetorical." Either way, sounds very similar to me.  Maybe others can help.

DAL

My suspicion is that the same is true for deSiliva, but I was hoping that given the fact that the shorter work was published 12 years later means that it might have some updated interaction.

Posts 3096
Whyndell Gizzard | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Sep 7 2014 2:12 PM

I would think that since one is 300 pages longer than the other, overlap is not going to be an issue, one has a greater depth than the other would seem obvious.

Posts 138
LogosEmployee
Clifford Kvidahl | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Sep 7 2014 2:33 PM

The Cascade volume is a brief introduction to matters pertaining to authorship, setting, etc. All background material one would expect to find in the introduction of a commentary.

The Eerdmans edition is a full-fledged commentary, with a robust introduction and comments on the text of Hebrews. The Cascade work will have some overlap with the introduction in the Eerdmans volume, but it is not a regurgitation.

Both are excellent. But if you want a taste at how deSilva handles Hebrews, the Cascade volume is as good of place as any to start.

Cliff

Page 1 of 1 (5 items) | RSS