New Testament Theology Series

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Ted Hans | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Jan 11 2010 11:12 AM

This would make a nice addition to the Logos Library. Thanks

 

Ted

 

  1. The Theology of the Pastoral Letters (New Testament Theology) by Frances Margaret Young
  2. The Theology of the First Letter to the Corinthians (New Testament Theology) by Victor Paul Furnish
  3. The Theology of the Gospel of Luke (New Testament Theology) by Joel B. Green
  4. The Theology of the Book of Revelation (New Testament Theology)
  5. The Theology of the Gospel of John (New Testament Theology)
  6. The Theology of the Gospel of Matthew (New Testament Theology) by Ulrich Luz
  7. The Theology of the Gospel of Mark (New Testament Theology)
  8. The Theology of the Letters of James, Peter, and Jude (New Testament Theology)
  9. The Theology of the Letter to the Hebrews (New Testament Theology) by Barnabas Lindars
  10. The Theology of the Johannine Epistles (New Testament Theology)
  11. The Theology of Paul's Letter to the Galatians (New Testament Theology)
  12. The Theology of Paul's Letter to the Romans (New Testament Theology)
  13. The Theology of the Second Letter to the Corinthians (New Testament Theology)
  14. The Theology of the Shorter Pauline Letters (New Testament Theology)
  15. The Theology of the Later Pauline Letters (New Testament Theology)

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Brent Brooks | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 28 2010 3:20 PM

I'll second that, Ted

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Dr Ray & Sharon Borah | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 28 2010 3:48 PM

Have to disagree Ted. Barnabas Lindars was a liberal whose apologetic he learned from Karl Barth's apostate theology. Spare us from more of these offerings in the Logos library. How about some books from theologians who are not 1. apostate, 2. charismatic, 3. "evangelical," but who write instead from a true historical-grammatical perspective.

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John Fugh, Jr. | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 28 2010 4:06 PM

Dr Ray Borah:
Have to disagree Ted. Barnabas Lindars was a liberal whose apologetic he learned from Karl Barth's apostate theology. Spare us from more of these offerings in the Logos library. How about some books from theologians who are not 1. apostate, 2. charismatic, 3. "evangelical," but who write instead from a true historical-grammatical perspective.

 

Dr Borah - This sounds harsh.  Regardless of each of our theological views, you may have been able to say the same thing a little kinder.

 

Blessings-

John

Posts 162
Clifford B. Kvidahl | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 28 2010 4:19 PM

I have read and enjoyed Barnabas Lindars' Theology of Hebrews. It is an excellent contribution to Hebrews studies. If we follow your way of thinking, then we may as well chuck BDAG, TDNT, and other essential tools simply because they are not "orthodox." Also, if you were to ask some of these "apostates" they would tell you they were following the historical-grammatical method. I would much rather read Barth than the junk coming through the pipeline of Christian publishing. Just my two-cents worth.

Cliff 

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Jose Diaz | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 28 2010 5:16 AM

I totally agree with Ted. This would be a great addition to the Logos Library. I have some of the titles, but I would be willing to buy this set for my logos library.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 28 2010 3:27 PM

Dr Ray Borah:

Have to disagree Ted. Barnabas Lindars was a liberal whose apologetic he learned from Karl Barth's apostate theology. Spare us from more of these offerings in the Logos library. How about some books from theologians who are not 1. apostate, 2. charismatic, 3. "evangelical," but who write instead from a true historical-grammatical perspective.

Logos tries to meet the needs of a broad audience. The consequence is that all of us wish Logos hadn't wasted resources on producing X when they could have more fruitfully produced Y. How 'bout a list of the historical-grammatical Y's you wish to see produced? There may be strong support for them.

 

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Raymond Urne | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Apr 14 2011 1:09 AM

I agree. This series would be a nice addition to the Logos Library. I have read Green's "The Theology of the Gospel of Luke" and Bauckham's "The Theology of the Book of Revelation". They are both very useful.

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Theolobias | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Apr 14 2011 1:36 AM

Dr Ray Borah:

Have to disagree Ted. Barnabas Lindars was a liberal whose apologetic he learned from Karl Barth's apostate theology. Spare us from more of these offerings in the Logos library. How about some books from theologians who are not 1. apostate, 2. charismatic, 3. "evangelical," but who write instead from a true historical-grammatical perspective.

Have you even read Barth with an open mind? If no: Please don't make any comments on things you might have heard but don't really know. If yes: Just make your own suggestions and let people who disagree with you have theirs. I, too, can only say I'd rather have only Barth in my library than 95 percent of the other things Logos is offering - you simply won't understand a good deal of theological thought of the last 100 years without having read Barth. But then, again, how can I try to convince people of this very fact when at the same time I try to prohibit Logos offering what they might regard as being crucial for theological studies?

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Mark Johnson | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 29 2011 12:40 PM

I would like this have this series available in Logos also!

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Ted Hans | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 29 2011 2:31 PM

Dr Ray Borah:

Have to disagree Ted. Barnabas Lindars was a liberal whose apologetic he learned from Karl Barth's apostate theology. Spare us from more of these offerings in the Logos library. How about some books from theologians who are not 1. apostate, 2. charismatic, 3. "evangelical," but who write instead from a true historical-grammatical perspective.

Thanks Dr Ray for your comments, I can appreciate your concerns on the theological perspective of Lindars & Barth. I think you will find in the forum that I have posted  books by theologians who share your perspective above.

I'd be interested in seeing a book suggestion from you, they may include some titles I have not mentioned/suggested in the forum. That said as in all reading one has to be a berean. 

Blessings

Ted

 

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George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 29 2011 2:46 PM

Dr Ray Borah:

Have to disagree Ted. Barnabas Lindars was a liberal whose apologetic he learned from Karl Barth's apostate theology. Spare us from more of these offerings in the Logos library. How about some books from theologians who are not 1. apostate, 2. charismatic, 3. "evangelical," but who write instead from a true historical-grammatical perspective.

Mr. Borah,

One says, "I belong to Apollos," or "I belong to Cephas," or "I belong to Christ."  Are we not a contentious lot?  You must recall that it was this very Karl Barth whom you label an apostate who called the churches of Germany to a renewed study of the bible itself and who was active in the "Confessing Church" in opposition to the state controlled church of the National Socialists.  To be deprived of his insights would leave a very deep chasm in our understanding of the period indeed.  The obvious answer is that whether you approve of him or not, he was and remains an important figure.  You can ignore him if you like by simply not purchasing the work.

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

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Ted Hans | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 29 2011 2:55 PM

George Somsel:
The obvious answer is that whether you approve of him or not, he was and remains an important figure.  You can ignore him if you like by simply not purchasing the work.

And there i was thinking, my friend George only objects to interlinearsStick out tongue.

Ted

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David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 29 2011 2:56 PM

I probably disagree with 95+% of the commentaries I own in Logos format...and I own quite a few. Are some apostate? I have my opinion, but the final decision isn't mine. I am SUPPOSED TO JUDGE whether their words are false or true, but I'm not supposed to render a verdict against them. That, as a friend of mine says, is above my pay-grade. That said, I LIKE owning commentaries from those who not only think "differently" than I do, but also those whom I consider to speak heretical hogwash. By studying their writings, I am able to both test my own understanding, and better understand the mindset, perspective, and argumentation of those with whom I disagree.

I will add one additional caveat: The ability of one to recognize wrongness, error, and falsehood in another does not in itself convey accuracy, rightness, and truth to oneself.

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