Why Does The Pentecostal & Charismatic Package Not Go Past Silver

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Posts 104
Kristin Dantzler | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 20 2014 1:46 PM

I am not familiar with the other resource and I look forward to checking it out.  The above clause just seemed prejorative to me  but I accept that was not your intent.  It is so easy to be misinterpreted in this type of medium and it is one reason that I use an old fashion phone more than email whenever possible.  Peace!

Posts 3
Damon Davis | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 20 2014 8:47 PM

I think one factor may be how young the movement actually is. Most denominations are a few centuries old and have a wealth of work to match their age. Plus they were formal movements from the start. Pentecostals are really the only denomination that is technically not Protestant. They were not born out of protest. So theologically they are all over the place from Trinitarian to oneness. there are also many distinctions in other areas within the movement so it's really hard to universally define the charismatic movement. 

Posts 3937
abondservant | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 20 2014 11:15 PM

the P&C movement can't really be divorced from its protestant roots though.

Further, I think most Pentecostals would "protest" to the treatment of the sign gifts of most cessationist churches.

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Posts 102
Andrew Mercer | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 21 2014 12:27 AM

I'm a pentecostal by expression and conviction, but reformed in most of my theology. There isn't a lot from popular pentecostals that I would want in Logos, maybe a few in Vryso. However, I am very glad that someone like Gordon Fee is well represented as is Jack Hayford.

To be honest, why would I would a Joel Osteen book when I can have John Piper or Tim Keller? Just my $0.02

Posts 98
Ed Blough | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 21 2014 8:59 AM

I guess I don't understand. I go through the P&C book list and I don't see books by Stanley Horton, Jack Hayford and others that I know Logos has published in the past. The Life in the Spirit Study Bible isn't included again something Logos has published in the past.  Why is that?

I also agree that Logos must be very selective when deciding on who to include there is a ton junk claiming P&C basis written yearly.

Posts 98
Ed Blough | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 21 2014 9:04 AM

Damon Davis:

I think one factor may be how young the movement actually is. Most denominations are a few centuries old and have a wealth of work to match their age. Plus they were formal movements from the start. Pentecostals are really the only denomination that is technically not Protestant. They were not born out of protest. So theologically they are all over the place from Trinitarian to oneness. there are also many distinctions in other areas within the movement so it's really hard to universally define the charismatic movement. 

What?????

Pentecostalism was born out of the Holiness movement that was a part of nearly every denomination at the time.  It is as Protestant as the Baptist, Lutheran, Methodist, Presbyterian churches it was born in.

So I'm not sure what your were trying to say. 

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 21 2014 9:44 AM

Ed Blough:

I go through the P&C book list and I don't see books by Stanley Horton, Jack Hayford and others that I know Logos has published in the past. The Life in the Spirit Study Bible isn't included again something Logos has published in the past.  Why is that?

The base packages give a nominal 90% discount on titles, which means Logos can't pay the usual royalties per individual title (the idea is that we buy a bundle of several times the bookcount we would otherwise, so it averages out). For Logos to include works into a BP they need to get a new agreeement with the publisher.

Some things that run on Logos and were sold in the past were actually published by third parties (such as Thomas Nelson, now belonging to Zondervan). Some of those treated Logos resources like paper books: produce a large quantity (CD-ROMs), sell it ever cheaper over time, scrap the rest and forget about it. They may even have had the rights only for the one-batch run, or for a certain time, or whatever. Or they are not/no longer interested to work with Logos, maybe trying own "revenue streams". Or they may not want their products "diluted" by appearing in a BP at all, or alongside those of a competitor in financial ot theological sense. All of these and more reasons may lead to the fact that a publisher doesn't allow their works into a BP - or only at conditions Logos is not willing to accept. We all are poorer through this (gee, we even have Lutheran BPs without Luther's works in them!).

Ed Blough:

Logos must be very selective when deciding on who to include there is a ton junk claiming P&C basis written yearly.

Logos will try to balance that BPs of the same "level" have roughly the same number of resources, total price, and appeal to customers. They won't be overly selective, I think - especiall since the older traditions have lots of public domain books that will somewhat "beef up" the $ and resource count, which I don't really see in the P&C. But Logos will need to include works of value to sell the higher level packages. 

 

 

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Posts 787
James Hiddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 21 2014 11:03 AM

The Pents are a part of the Protestant movement. I don't know why anyone would say otherwise just research it online.

Posts 98
Ed Blough | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 25 2014 8:24 AM

NB.Mick:

Ed Blough:

I go through the P&C book list and I don't see books by Stanley Horton, Jack Hayford and others that I know Logos has published in the past. The Life in the Spirit Study Bible isn't included again something Logos has published in the past.  Why is that?

The base packages give a nominal 90% discount on titles, which means Logos can't pay the usual royalties per individual title (the idea is that we buy a bundle of several times the bookcount we would otherwise, so it averages out). For Logos to include works into a BP they need to get a new agreeement with the publisher.

Some things that run on Logos and were sold in the past were actually published by third parties (such as Thomas Nelson, now belonging to Zondervan). Some of those treated Logos resources like paper books: produce a large quantity (CD-ROMs), sell it ever cheaper over time, scrap the rest and forget about it. They may even have had the rights only for the one-batch run, or for a certain time, or whatever. Or they are not/no longer interested to work with Logos, maybe trying own "revenue streams". Or they may not want their products "diluted" by appearing in a BP at all, or alongside those of a competitor in financial ot theological sense. All of these and more reasons may lead to the fact that a publisher doesn't allow their works into a BP - or only at conditions Logos is not willing to accept. We all are poorer through this (gee, we even have Lutheran BPs without Luther's works in them!).

Ed Blough:

Logos must be very selective when deciding on who to include there is a ton junk claiming P&C basis written yearly.

Logos will try to balance that BPs of the same "level" have roughly the same number of resources, total price, and appeal to customers. They won't be overly selective, I think - especiall since the older traditions have lots of public domain books that will somewhat "beef up" the $ and resource count, which I don't really see in the P&C. But Logos will need to include works of value to sell the higher level packages. 

 

 

Okay that all makes sense.  I  see I had an incorrect definition of a P&C package, I defined it as one that would be a package that contained everything P&C oriented that Logos publishes.  

Posts 178
Kendall Sholtess | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 27 2014 2:46 AM

Silver is as smart as we get, man. We're focused on getting more of the Spirit. We don't need no hypercalifragilisticananalydosis. 

Just joking. Greetings from a Mennonite Bapticostal. If I ever break past silver I'll let you know. Smile

Posts 787
James Hiddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 27 2014 9:29 AM

Kendall Sholtess:

Silver is as smart as we get, man. We're focused on getting more of the Spirit. We don't need no hypercalifragilisticananalydosis. 

Just joking. Greetings from a Mennonite Bapticostal. If I ever break past silver I'll let you know. Smile

Wow never heard of a Mennonite Bapticostal. Is that the same as an Amish PenteCatholic j/k Smile

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