Logos by Subscription?

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This post has 90 Replies | 13 Followers

Posts 468
Charlene | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 8:08 AM

Dan:

Whyndell Grizzard:

Not interested in subscriptions at all, at any level. I want to own what I pay for. 

Couldn't agree more. I rent things I use once  (like movies). I own things I use over and over (like a library).

I agree! I want to own the resources in my library so that they are there when I need it. I often buy books that I know I won't have time to read at the present time, but are in the areas of my interest and usually on sale. And I don't know how many times when I was working on my degree, as I researched different topics for papers, I found that I already had many of the resources needed in my library. That is what a library is for.

If the idea is to attract new customers, then the key factor will be cost, so make it low enough so that people will try the software out. It definitely needs to be below $100, but I think you would get more takers if it was below $50. Yes, the Logos software is great, but people will never know that if it is too expensive for them to take the test drive.

Charlene

Posts 4841
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 10:03 AM

toughski:

I doubt one can pay over $30/month year after year after year.

I wonder what your current Logos monthly payment is? Mine is over ten times more than the amount you say is the most a customer could afford. I don't know what percentage of Logos users have more than a $100 monthly bill, but I bet it is quite a few. I don't think many customers are actually thinking this through costwise. I suspect a lot of people whose gut reaction to a monthly subscription cost is "no way!" are already paying much more than that each month to pay off current purchases.

Yes, I worry about losing access to things I don't "own" (license), but I think there is 0% chance Logos goes away before the end comes, then it is a mute point. Besides, I own pretty much all I have to own already, although there is still much I would like to access.

Here's the thing...I doubt I have ever actively used more than 1% of what I own, and even if I wanted to, I probably couldn't actively use more than 10-15%. If I read a book every single day, I probably could never finish getting through my library. I don't really need to own these books. I just want to search them to see if there is anything worth accessing. Right now, I have to own them to search them, but under a subscription model, I could just pay for the search function (so to speak) without having to come out of pocket to own something I may never use. I don't know what other folks' usages patterns are, but I think I could save a lot of money by subscribing to the Logos catalog, if it's done right.

As a potential user, I obviously would like it to be as affordable as possible. Besides, I'm sure purchasing will still be an option. For those who don't want to do this, that's fine. But I'm pretty sure a lot of people will like this option for a lot of reasons, not the least of which is it could very well save them money.

Charlene:

I want to own the resources in my library so that they are there when I need it. I often buy books that I know I won't have time to read at the present time, but are in the areas of my interest and usually on sale. And I don't know how many times when I was working on my degree, as I researched different topics for papers, I found that I already had many of the resources needed in my library. That is what a library is for.

I realize you don't realize it, but your argument for buying is the fundamental argument for a subscription option.

Anyone who is constantly making Logos purchases would make out like a bandit with a subscription service.

Tes:

. I hope Logos will respect its customers interest.The new concept of subscriptions decrease  motivation  to make any further purchases.

And this is a bad thing how?

Let's make this simple. Suppose it cost $100K to purchase everything Logos has. You will never spend that much, or even close to it, with a subscription, and yet you would have access to everything they offer. Yeah...saving tens of thousands of dollars!! Please, make it not so!!! Oh, the humanity! Oh, the misery of having money in the bank. Oh, the misery of accessing everything Logos has. When will the pain ever end!!

Posts 786
JRS | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 10:54 AM

IMO, proceed with an appropriately-priced, subscription service parallel to the current buy-it-own-it model.  Then, let Adam Smith's 'invisible hand' of the free marketplace decide if one or the other should disappear, or if both models should exist side by side. 

I think Bob is probably correct, the standard/typical Logos library of the future doesn't attempt to purchase downloads of every book Logos offers, but is a blend of a minimal core of standard books ... supplemented by a subscription to the remaining 39,900 resources.  If you think about it, it is exactly the same model that we used thirty years ago ... we only owned copies of the most useful/important volumes [that we could afford] and relied on libraries to fill in what was needed beyond that.

How blessed is the one whom Thou dost choose, and bring near to Thee(Psa 65:4a)

Posts 10635
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 10:58 AM

David, you make a good point.  The desirability of a subscription might correlate to the number of volumes one wants but can't afford.

Now, we could look at the problem in terms of owning goats on the Shephalah.  What if we have few goats and see our neighbor with many.  By renting some extra goats, we can feel much better, plus market the milk. And pay the goat rent.

OK.  Let's say the goat example kind of got mixed up.  Say we can't afford the new Cadallac.  But we 'could' rent it.

OK.  Let's go back to the goat example.

"I didn't know God made honky tonk angels."

Posts 4841
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 11:22 AM

Denise:

David, you make a good point.  The desirability of a subscription might correlate to the number of volumes one wants but can't afford.

Now, we could look at the problem in terms of owning goats on the Shephalah.  What if we have few goats and see our neighbor with many.  By renting some extra goats, we can feel much better, plus market the milk. And pay the goat rent.

OK.  Let's say the goat example kind of got mixed up.  Say we can't afford the new Cadallac.  But we 'could' rent it.

OK.  Let's go back to the goat example.

Denise, can we split the difference and go with an angora--the Cadallac of goats? Idea

Posts 60
Rustamania | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 11:22 AM

I like the idea.  For me it is similar to netflix, spotify, etc maybe more than other people on here.  I use 10% of my library multiple times and the other 90% probably once.  Things I would like to see:

1.  I want the ability to keep all highlights/notes in some fashion.  If the resource goes away or I quit the subscription, I would want to somehow keep this information or be able to download it somehow.

2.  Sharing would be beneficial.  I wouldn't own netflix on my own, but my kids use it and it makes it worth it.  It is also cheap, so it doesn't make that much difference.

3.  Really would want access to the entire library.  If not the entire library, then it would have to be pretty big and not just all the old stuff.  I can get that somewhere else for free if needed for a quick hit.  If it is only a small collection, then I may as well buy the book and "own" them.

4.  Would need to be able to have offline access for at least a portion of the library to read on the go.

5.  I can't imagine paying much more than 20-30 dollars a month.  If it is 10 or 15, then I probably don't even think about paying for it (even when I am not really using it).  More than that, then I possibly re-evaluate my need every month.

I used to really value "owning" my music, but now I don't really care.  I can go out and listen to any song I want in a matter of seconds, same with movies.  I felt the same way about books, but that is starting to fade also, too.  What I do want to own are my thoughts/notes on those books.  

If I am worried about passing books down to my kids, I could just save up money in a mutual fund and fund their subscription for life.  That is kind of sad, but I think its the way things are heading.

The Amazon unlimited library doesn't work for me because I would only read one or two books a month anyway, I may as well buy them, but from a searching/knowledge/research point of view, I would be more app to subscribe.

Posts 2957
Tes | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 11:34 AM

David Paul:

toughski:

I doubt one can pay over $30/month year after year after year.

I wonder what your current Logos monthly payment is? Mine is over ten times more than the amount you say is the most a customer could afford. I don't know what percentage of Logos users have more than a $100 monthly bill, but I bet it is quite a few. I don't think many customers are actually thinking this through costwise. I suspect a lot of people whose gut reaction to a monthly subscription cost is "no way!" are already paying much more than that each month to pay off current purchases.

Yes, I worry about losing access to things I don't "own" (license), but I think there is 0% chance Logos goes away before the end comes, then it is a mute point. Besides, I own pretty much all I have to own already, although there is still much I would like to access.

Here's the thing...I doubt I have ever actively used more than 1% of what I own, and even if I wanted to, I probably couldn't actively use more than 10-15%. If I read a book every single day, I probably could never finish getting through my library. I don't really need to own these books. I just want to search them to see if there is anything worth accessing. Right now, I have to own them to search them, but under a subscription model, I could just pay for the search function (so to speak) without having to come out of pocket to own something I may never use. I don't know what other folks usages patterns are, but I think I could save a lot of money by subscribing to the Logos catalog, if it's done right.

As a potential user, I obviously would like it to be as affordable as possible. Besides, I'm sure purchasing will still be an option. For those who don't want to do this, that's fine. But I'm pretty sure a lot of people will like this option for a lot of reasons, not the least of which is it could very well save them money.

Charlene:

I want to own the resources in my library so that they are there when I need it. I often buy books that I know I won't have time to read at the present time, but are in the areas of my interest and usually on sale. And I don't know how many times when I was working on my degree, as I researched different topics for papers, I found that I already had many of the resources needed in my library. That is what a library is for.

I realize you don't realize it, but your argument for buying is the fundamental argument for a subscription option.

Anyone who is constantly making Logos purchases would make out like a bandit with a subscription service.

Tes:

. I hope Logos will respect its customers interest.The new concept of subscriptions decrease  motivation  to make any further purchases.

And this is a bad thing how?

Let's make this simple. Suppose it cost $100K to purchase everything Logos has. You will never spend that much, or even close to it, with a subscription, and yet you would have access to everything they offer. Yeah...saving tens of thousands of dollars!! Please, make it not so!!! Oh, the humanity! Oh, the misery of having money in the bank. Oh, the misery of accessing everything Logos has. When will the pain ever end!!

Because it makes me to be suspicious, what comes next? I don't know what is going on in Logos’s mind. What is their motivation? I am happy with the monthly payment, because I know that once I have finished the monthly payment plan, I am going to be the owner of my resources. Why  should I pay monthly fees, just I pay for electric and telephone bills every month? Besides what ever I want to do with the resourcs ,they are not under my control, there is a limitation of place, internet, and so on. My preference is to own the resources for which I will pay for. It may be good for those who are interested on subsctiption, but Logos should leave a room for those of us who want to perceive the way it has used to be up to now.

Blessings in Christ.

Posts 496
John Duffy | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 11:55 AM

Hi Bob,

Thanks for including us in the discussion up front - much appreciated.

Subscription implies paying a set fee and getting updates or new editions as they are released over time. With the Logos engine being free, I think that when it comes to resource costs, the term I prefer is rental rather than subscription.  But that aside, I think rental is a great idea. 

I am a paid member of an institutional theological library not too far away.  Renting resources would be somewhat equivalent to paying to have access to a library. 

I would love to be able to rent all kinds of resources, such as bundles, large expensive commentary sets (even if I would only be interested in one book for a short period). Or, what about a temporary base package booster (say, to get up to collectors' for a few months)?  Basically, if I'm working on something (sermon series or research project), I would often love to have access to the relevant resources which I don't own, but which I can't afford. I either try to justify purchasing some, or do without.  If I had a rental option, I would probably rent a lot more, and be happier, and see a better price point for others to get into Logos too. 

Rental with a simple formula based on the dynamic pricing total cost of a bundle would seem rather simpler to administer than adding a completely new pricing layer to products. 

If not all products are available for rental, e.g. if certain publishers don't want to participate, then a vote on new resources to rent would be good to provide feedback. Voting on what resources to produce in Logos format shouldn't be limited to rental/subscription users only, though. 

If base packages were included, rental might hit sales hard, though.  So maybe exclude base packages in general, with the exception of allowing Platinim/Diamond/Collectors' upgrade to be rented for everyone who had Gold or above? 

If rental period is beyond a certain time (e.g. six months), then the option to purchase at a reduced cost could be very enticing, with a proportion of the rental payments being the discount level (or even a sliding scale of increasing proportions of rental payment going to discount, up to 100%).  This would allow me to justify longer rental periods in the knowledge that I could convert into purchasing.

To be honest, I'd prefer not to purchase or subscribe to Faithlife generated academic/pastoral/devotional resources. New data sets and the like are great to subscribe to. But I prefer to know the authors of all content (e.g. I can't evaluate Faithlife Study Bible content because I don't know who wrote what, and don't know most of the contributors anyway), and to have those resources critically reviewed just like they are at present from a variety of publishers.  That means that I want to purchase from existing publishers.  That's not to say that Faithlife resources aren't equally as good, but just that I don't know whether they are or not, and can't justify spending as a result.  I don't want Netflix to start making movies, but just to deliver them, unless of course, their movies are critically reviewed in all the usual places. If in-house publications start to get serious reviews externally, as other resources do, I'd be just as interested in that case, as is expected to be the case with EEC volumes or Mobile Ed courses. 

Offline use is the main way to go for me, although there are certain advantages with cloud-based computing.  People like me want to know that even if the servers go down, or a transatlantic fibre-optic cable is damaged, or even if a local builder digs up the neighbourhood broadband cables, etc., that I can still use the software with all its downloaded resources from my computer.  About a year ago, our local ultra-reliable, ultra-fast cable broadband service had a complete broadband service outage for everyone in our neighbourhood for five whole days.  My children were quite frustrated, but were over the moon to get back online.  Since I work from home, I was just about able to check emails by using my phone as wi-fi tethering, but it was slower than it would normally be because of poor signal strength where we are.  The connection was very, very slow, and not very usable for Logos and other high-bandwidth programs.  If Logos were even more cloud-based than it is at present, I'd serious consider an exit strategy to another program, reluctantly and sadly. 

But your option of an online service as part of a group is interesting, as long as it's not a way to drive the cloud-based model into popularity so that the local/offline installation becomes marginalised over time (e.g. what would happen if the church member with Starter for online use wanted to upgrade or purchase their own personal copy?  would they get an online package like they are used to, or would they need to learn to use the more powerful locally installed program with a new steep learning curve which might cause them to struggle and wonder why they upgraded?).  I like the idea which would engage many more people with Logos, but not if it is driving cloud forward and phasing out local installs.  I'd love to be able to say to all our folk that they could access great resources using Logos, and online would be the easiest way for them to do so at present, but I would imagine that justifying purchasing Collectors' edition would be too expensive for me (especially since we have only a very small congregation).  How about having a Plus option for additional subscription on all Platimum, Diamond and Collectors, with the cost difference being proportionally lower for Collectors' edition?  That way I could justify the price increase on its own.

Overall, the ability to have temporary access to published products is most attractive, and a purchase option for medium/long term rentals, as well as some way to encourage church members to get engaged with logos being exciting too.

Posts 468
Charlene | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 12:15 PM

David Paul:

Charlene:

I want to own the resources in my library so that they are there when I need it. I often buy books that I know I won't have time to read at the present time, but are in the areas of my interest and usually on sale. And I don't know how many times when I was working on my degree, as I researched different topics for papers, I found that I already had many of the resources needed in my library. That is what a library is for.

I realize you don't realize it, but your argument for buying is the fundamental argument for a subscription option..

I understand what you are saying. I just didn't clearly state what I meant. When I said "that is what a library is for," I meant "personal library" = just as if I had shelves and shelves of books in my office. I bought many hardbound books in the past, even though I didn't have time to read them at the point of purchase, but I knew that one day I would like to read those books. And thus when the time came, where I "had to read" due a school paper being due, my electronic Logos book was already there. I didn't have to fork out more money to buy the book, since I had already purchased it. With a Logos subscription, the cost never goes away, as it continues monthly. Plus I am not paying subscription or rental fees for books that I never want to read. I have the books that I want, and I will always have those books. They don't disappear after the rental agreement comes to a close.

Charlene

Posts 5314
DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 12:43 PM

I have mixed thoughts on subscription models and would have to see what was really on offer  - pricing and means of access would two major factors in whether I would embrace it or not.

Bob Pritchett:
Online only vs. offline software, too. Should subscription access to Logos Bible Software be only for online use (say, http://biblia.com  with lots more functionality from the desktop version) or should you be able to use the desktop apps by subscription, too?

Personally I think online access only is a dangerous option.  There should be the option to download titles of your choosing.  The recent server outage shows the potential headaches for Logos and inconvenience for users if such an outage occurred with an online only subscription service.  The potential size of a subscription library may make it impractical for a full download of every resource for every subscriber but it is a must to be able to download select titles.

Bob Pritchett:
All-in or toe-in-the-water. If you were going to subscribe, would you like to just pay one monthly fee and get access to a massive library ($100/mo for Collector's?) or would you prefer to still own your core library and purchase smaller supplemental subscriptions? ($10/mo for a supplemental set of resources.)

Well considering what I and a lot of other users have already invested in Logos I think the only way for existing users is ownership of core library with supplemental subscription options at various levels.  Essentially there would have to be some sort of Dynamic Pricing on the subscription fee ottherwise I would reject and think others would also a situation where say User A owned a Gold level core package and User B portfolio level package that both users would have to pay the same subscription price to access a Collectors Level Package. Pricing would need to take into consideration what core package(s) the subscriber already owned.

Bob Pritchett:
How much? Netflix is $8.99 / month, but satellite television can top $100 / month. Internet access can be $20-50+ / month. What price points should Logos offer? Just low price points with multiple options/collections so you can build your own subscription? Or a single, higher price with tons more content in the subscription?

This would be influence by outstanding balance on my payment plan to start with, later as that reduced I might be willing to consider a higher price point with tons of content, initially I would look at smaller collections.

Bob Pritchett:
Temporary book access. When you subscribe to Netflix you get access to thousands of streaming movies, but movies come and go from the collection. Would you subscribe to a 1,000 book library if not all the books were permanent? What if 100 of the books rotated every three months? You might get fresher / more-valuable new content from publishers, but only for a few months. (This could incentivize publishers to allow more valuable content into a subscription library, in the hopes that it would provoke some permanent sales.)
 

Rotating access would be a real turn-off. Not a fan of this idea at all. If I wanted to go back to a book I had used in the past and found it had been rotated out of my collection and to access it again for another short term usage having to pay full price would negate the purpose of having a subscription.  I don't see any correlation between the product Netflix offers and the product Logos offers to support rotation.

Posts 3942
abondservant | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 3:19 PM

I like things as they are.

As has been said before, as long as I don't HAVE to switch - I'm not opposed. 

If I HAD to switch, I'd have about 1500$ in returns (made in the last 30 days or so) so that I could afford the new monthly payment. It wouldn't drive me off... Maybe annoy me. But not drive me off. Also what would happen to the resources I already own? Would I get a dynamic discount? 

While I know that I have your attention, some times you make me purchase titles twice. I dislike that. :( Its an undocumented feature of the academic program. 

L2 lvl4, L3 Scholars, L4 Scholars, L5 Platinum,  L6 Collectors. L7 Baptist Portfolio. L8 Baptist Platinum.

Posts 1671
Forum MVP
Levi Durfey | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 3:19 PM

Disciple of Christ (doc):
Rotating access would be a real turn-off. Not a fan of this idea at all. If I wanted to go back to a book I had used in the past and found it had been rotated out of my collection and to access it again for another short term usage having to pay full price would negate the purpose of having a subscription.  I don't see any correlation between the product Netflix offers and the product Logos offers to support rotation.

Couldn't have said it any better...I would not want a rotating library.

Posts 1874
Alan Macgregor | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 4:25 PM

Bob

I have absolutely no interest in subscribing to Logos. I have the Logos library I own because I have purchased it over a period of 20+ years. It is mine. I have included it in my will to pass on to a younger friend in the ministry, just as I benefitted in years past from older colleagues libraries when they retired or died.

BTW I have kept my L3 library and Licence Backup files on my computer, so that if Logos ceases trading or ceases to be accessible offline, I can revert to a useable Logos program.

Every blessing

Alan

iMac Retina 5K, 27": 4GHz; 16GB RAM;MacOS 10.12.2; 1TB FD; Logos 7

MacBook Air 13.3": 1.8GHz; 4GB RAM; MacOS 10.12.2; 256GB SSD; Logos 7

iPad Pro 32GB WiFi iOS 10.2

iPhone 5s 32GB iOS 10.2

Posts 2497
David Ames | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 7:08 PM

I have a proposed study that would need the use of the Classic Commentaries and Studies sets.  Renting is the only way to go at that price.  Now all I need to do is find a way to have nothing else to do for three months.

Posts 5
Andrew Sedlacek | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 9:37 PM

Admittedly I tend to be a casual Logos user. I started years ago with a Level 2 package. I've been doing the Starter and Crossgrades since then and adding resources that interest me along the way. So I have a mix and match library.

My fear of subscriptions is that it becomes a recurring cost that now must compete for a place on my monthly budget. As much as I would like to think costs stay the same, like most subscription, I suspect Logos subscription costs will increase over time.  Currently if I have the money I buy resources if not I don't, but I still can use what I have.

While I like the current model if I had to go subscriptions here a few of my thoughts. I think these are similar to ideas already brought up.(I am not thinking through any figures I happen to throw out)

Availability. Yes a concern. However, most times I'm with out a connection is when I'm on vacation. If the online model had a feature similar to the mobile apps where you can download some resources and perhaps have some sort of limited bible study functionality.

Rather than preset packages maybe subscription levels by number of resources.  Say for $10 a month you can access 100 resources that you can mix and match and change anytime. Like a library that lets you check out a certain amount of books at a time. This way you can tailor the pricing structure to the needs of users.

This can go with the "All-in or toe-in-the-water" model. "... or would you prefer to still own your core library and purchase smaller supplemental subscriptions?"

Bottomline,  Logos is Cool. I would hate to be in a situation that for some reason I can't afford to pay a monthly fee and not be able to use it anymore. Or on the more paranoid side, being cut off from it for some reason. (cue the black helicopters).

Thanks,

Andy

   

Posts 468
BKMitchell | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 1 2014 11:41 PM

abondservant:

I like things as they are.

As has been said before, as long as I don't HAVE to switch - I'm not opposed. ..

I like this line of thought!Yes

חַפְּשׂוּ בַּתּוֹרָה הֵיטֵב וְאַל תִּסְתַּמְּכוּ עַל דְּבָרַי

Posts 179
Matthew Langlois | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 2 2014 5:29 AM

Alan Macgregor:

Bob

I have absolutely no interest in subscribing to Logos. I have the Logos library I own because I have purchased it over a period of 20+ years. It is mine. I have included it in my will to pass on to a younger friend in the ministry, just as I benefitted in years past from older colleagues libraries when they retired or died.

BTW I have kept my L3 library and Licence Backup files on my computer, so that if Logos ceases trading or ceases to be accessible offline, I can revert to a useable Logos program.

Every blessing

Alan

I am in full agreement with all the above.

Posts 391
Geo Philips | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 2 2014 6:13 AM

Bob, Thanks for the question.

I am admittedly part of the Netflix generation which is used to the 'licensing as opposed to ownership' model -  one which many of us have accepted to gain the benefits of accessibility and seamlessness that model provides.

But I dont think a full Logos subscription would be economically feasible for many users - for eg., I am willing to pay a significant monthly cost for a payment plan knowing that the resources are 'mine' but I would hesitate to pay that as a rental cost.

A model like Kindle Unlimited would work but that product is significantly constrained by the books that it does not offer - even Amazon sees it more as a supplement for hardcore readers.

I would like, then, a kind of 'Full Library Access' package, which allows me to a) read any article that comes up in a full library (all of Logos) search and b) read any article that is cross-referenced in any resource I am currently reading. 

The challenge in this model is to determine the boundaries of article length and how much further back or forward in the resource the user would have access to but I do think that is solvable.

Cheers

 

Posts 1062
William Gabriel | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 2 2014 7:39 AM

Bob, thanks for asking us. The answers I've seen have confirmed my suspicions, the heavily invested Logos users (read: forum regulars) are biased toward library ownership. I feel the same way now as I've invested in a substantial library. Perhaps I'm mistaken with my perspective, but I've viewed my Logos library as an asset. Certain subscription models would significantly devalue that asset, as has happened with my CD and DVD collection. Perhaps that's just life, and perhaps written IP is going that direction too.

I can't remember where it is, but I recall reading a forum post from Bob that said something along the lines of, "If everyone in Christendom [US?/World?] subscribed to Logos at $3 / month, we could offer the whole library to everyone." I know both the numerator and denominator of that equation have changed in the mean time, but probably not by orders of magnitude. I've got to say, if the subscription product that could be offered was anything close to that, I would rejoice. I'd consider my purchased library "backup" in that case and use the rented library. Obviously, what's possible here are matters of marketing and testing that are beyond me. 

There are some good ideas and bad ideas in the list. I feel like some of the best ideas are subscription groups, and there should be some kind of other library sharing capability that works with the physical book analogy since we're digitally bound by. If I could buy Collector's and give everyone in my church access to Starter + the ability to "loan" books (they leave my library and enter someone else's, temporarily), that would be something special.

I don't think all-in vs. toe-in-the-water need to be mutually exclusive. Based on the current rental prices of material though (getting to your "How much" question), I've got this feeling that these subscription packages aren't going to end up being appealing. Why pay so much per month for these products when I could just "buy" them on a payment plan and eventually be done with it? I look at the CCCB and see that you can have a 2 year payment plan for $150 or a monthly rental at $50. I know you've got to balance these things, but the only way I would rent this is if I had no practical way to buy it. If you want people to subscribe, you're going to have to be really aggressive on price. If you want new users to Logos, you're going to have to look more like Netflix than Comcast (also consider that it's true for their industry too--many people are 'cutting the cord' and using Netflix as a Comcast proxy).

One final thought about the benefits of the rental idea. You could prepare pre-built indexes that download with rented resources, assuming you allow desktop access. If you know the exact set someone will be working with, then you can eliminate one of those program necessities that end up causing much weeping and gnashing of teeth.

-Bill

Posts 1865
mike | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 2 2014 7:47 AM

subscription for movies and music?  ..maybe/yes.

subscription for theology books? ... maybe, I'm 51/49, learning towards a no.

why? my theology books worth more than any movies and music.

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