were Jesus disciples Israelites

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Posts 70
Wayne L Owens | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Jan 16 2010 8:13 AM

- while reading the book of John, the question came to me ... were Jesus disciples Israelites?  can anyone assist?

Posts 5337
Kevin Becker | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 16 2010 8:19 AM

Depends on what you mean by Israelite. The common scholarly use of this term refers to the northern 10 tribes which were deported under Assyria and never returned. I don't recall if any of the disciples traced their heritage back to the northern 10 tribes. I would consult a Bible dictionary to see which tribe (if any) the disciples were from.

If you simply meant to ask if they were Jews, then yes, all the disciples were Jews.

 

Posts 418
davidphillips | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 16 2010 8:38 AM

They sure were! For a very short answer, take a look at John 1:47 -

"47 When Jesus saw Nathanael approaching, he said of him, "Here is a true Israelite, in whom there is nothing false."

Also, Matthew 10:5-6 -

"5 These twelve Jesus sent out with the following instructions: "Do not go among the Gentiles or enter any town of the Samaritans. 6 Go rather to the lost sheep of Israel."

There are plenty of other places we could look to see that they were Israelites, but is there any particular reason that would cause you to think they weren't?

Posts 198
Bryan Brodess | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 16 2010 8:41 AM

Isrealite.

Born of the liniage of Jacob (later name changed to Isreal) who had 12 sons, thus 12 tribes. This is the "isreal" christ spoke of which david meantioned as a whole

 

Also spoke of the upper ten tribes, who were scattered by the syrians. as apposed to jews, who were of the lower two tribes.. and around in isreal at the time of Christ..

 

 

Posts 286
Dr. Charles A. Wootten | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 16 2010 2:31 PM

{{{SOAP BOX ON!!}}}

Isrealite.

 

I have this problem with my newer students using this same word. Once I teach them to pronounce it correctly, they can spell it correctly all the time. I tell them that "Israel is real" and they get the hint. I teach them to pronounce it as "iss rah EL" with the nuance on the last syllable, since it is God's Name. (The first part means "prince"). Every once in awhile I'll bring a video to class where someone who should know better mispronounces a proper name and the students make remarks about that.

 

{{{soap box off!!!}}}

 

{charley}

running Logos Bible Software 6.0a: Collector's Edition on HP e9220y (AMD Phenom II X4 2.60GHz 8.00GB 64-bit Win 7 Pro SP1) & iPad (mini) apps.

Posts 109
Larry Heflin | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 16 2010 2:58 PM

The apostle Paul designates his fellow Jews and himself as such.

Pertaining to his kinsmen:

 For I could wish that I myself were accursed, separated from Christ for the sake of my brethren, my kinsmen according to the flesh, who are Israelites (Ro 9:3-4)

Pertaining to himself:

circumcised the eighth day, of the nation of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, [in addition, he designates himself as] a Hebrew of Hebrews (Phil 3:5)

[emphasis mine]

Posts 390
Alain Maashe | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 16 2010 4:02 PM

WayneLOwens:

- while reading the book of John, the question came to me ... were Jesus disciples Israelites?  can anyone assist?

Wayne, if your question came about because of John's use of the term "Jew(s)" that sometimes appears to imply that John, the writer of the Fourth Gospel (and by implication the other disciples)  is not one of them, you need to consider the following about its usage in the book of John

 The term “Jew(s)” (Ioudai/oj/Ioudai/oi) found seventy one times in the Fourth Gospel has a variety of meanings that are not always easily distinguishable but that are always context dependent. In general, the term refers to the Jewish people as both a religious and ethnic group (6:4; 7:2) or in relation to non-Jews such as the Samaritans (4:9, 22). Depending on the particular context, it could refer to a subgroup of the larger population such a inhabitants of Judea as opposed to Galileans (7:11); when applies to Jesus’ opponents, it also points to members of anotably strict sect of Judaism associated with Judea whose religious practices chiefly revolved around the Temple and the Mosaic Law. The Pharisees and key members of Israel’s ruling class belonged to this group and at times, the term “Jews” refers to them exclusively and underscores their opposition to Jesus or His forerunner (1:19; 7:13 Cf. 5:15–18; 9:18, 22). The term is also used to refer to ethnic Jews (the crowd) as distinguished from the Jewish leadership (6:41, 52; 7:35; 12:9, Cf. 8:22; 11:45–47). Other uses are more ambiguous and could refer to any combination of ethnic Jews, Judeans, or Jewish authorities (7:1, 11; 12:11 Cf. 7:19; 10:24; 12:42).

Passages like John 1:11 (He came to his own, and his own people did not receive him) and historical truths and popular assumptions about Judaism and the status of Jews in relations to God (cf. John 4:20-24; John 8:33-59) appear to show that John intended to show that even those who had the covenants of promise (Eph 2:12) whether “ethnic Jews, Judeans, or Jewish authorities” failed to receive the Messiah because they would not believe (the whole point of  the conclusion of the “Book of Signs” (chapters 1–12) in John 12:37-50). When used negatively, The “Jews” represent the response of unbelief by Jesus’ own people in relation to His identity as the Messiah.

 

As such, John fluid use of the term “Jews” and Pharisees (the sometimes equivalent term), often serves to highlight the growing opposing to Jesus that began at the level of the Jewish leadership but later permeated most ethnic Jews of Galilees and Judea. By chapter 7, the opposition to Jesus by the “Jews” refers to ethnic Jews, Judeans, the crowd, and the Jewish leadership. However, John is careful to point out that “Jews” is not always used in a negative fashion in the gospel as exemplified by the division among the Jews concerning the identity and messiaship of Jesus (7:11–12, 40–43). Judaism is not inherently evil or opposed to God, rather it is the perversion of the true religion by the Jewish leadership that is opposed; Jesus, the Jewish Messiah seeks to restore true worship and true Judaism There is a remnant of “Jews” that believes in Jesus (12:11 Cf. 1:47–49).

Alain

 

 

 

 

Posts 2
Jocko Johynson | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 9 2017 5:15 PM

Jews were just one of the Israelite tribes, coming from Judah. While all Jews are Israelites / Hebrew, not all Israelites and Hebrew are Jews. There is a distinction.

Posts 2
Jocko Johynson | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 9 2017 5:16 PM

FYI: Jews were just one of the Israelite tribes, coming from Judah. While all Jews are Israelites / Hebrew, not all Israelites and Hebrew are Jews. There is a distinction.

Posts 1
GRAYDON LEWIS HUFF, SR. | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jun 3 2017 9:47 AM

JESUS' DISCIPLES WERE ALL GALILEANS..EXCEPT JUDAS ISCARIOT...NONE WERE JEWS EXCEPT JUDAS ISCARIOT

Posts 5317
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jun 3 2017 10:55 AM

GRAYDON LEWIS HUFF, SR.:

JESUS' DISCIPLES WERE ALL GALILEANS..EXCEPT JUDAS ISCARIOT...NONE WERE JEWS EXCEPT JUDAS ISCARIOT

It is true none but Judas was from Judah but all were Jewish in a religious sense and likely in a heritage sense as well.. Jesus was Galilean but traced his linage to Judah, since as mentioned about the 10 tribes were deported the only real that is left would be the southern kingdom of Benjamin and Judah, as also pointed out above Paul who was of Benjamin considered himself Jewish and Israelite. There are numerous Scottish people living in London. The may describe themselves as a Londoner but being in different country doesn't stop them from identifying as Scottish and in the time of Jesus Israel was split up into 4 distinct provinces although it was one province under Herod the Great. 

-dan

Posts 11433
DMB | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jun 3 2017 11:13 AM

It's an interesting question and probably writer-specific.  Was 'jew' a stand-in for the Persian province, carried forward with greek-ization? And who were Galilleans .... gentiles? Or not.  The OT and apocrypha bounce around.  Then, you have your re-patriated Babylonian jews, likely from Judea.

I was surprised soapbox-Charlie knew the pronunciation of Israel.  I assume he meant the modern pronunciation ... the inscriptors didn't leave a how-to-say-it guide (thoigh now and then, one can surmise).

"God will save his fallen angels and their broken wings He'll mend."

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