Selling Logos 4 in Bookstores?

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Michael Lyman | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Feb 6 2010 4:15 AM

A couple of days after downloading Logos 4 my family and I went to a large Christian Bookstore in Knoxville that was the CBA bookstore of the year not too long ago. I saw they still had Logos 3 on the shelves and went over to the software resource person and asked if they were going to carry Logos 4.  She said she had never heard of it so I took her to the website and showed her a couple of videos. I told her I had managed two Christian bookstores for about 10 years and that I thought Logos was the best thing going. She called the store manager down to look at it and was pretty excited too.

Yesterday we went back to look at home school curriculum and I was surprised to see that they no longer had any Logos software. I didn't see the salesperson and didn't think to ask them while I was there why they no longer carried Logos which leads me to two questions.

1) Is Logos 4 available/going to be available to purchase in stores?

2) Have you all considered marketing it to the home school community?

 

Posts 142
Michael Sullivan | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 6 2010 4:44 AM

When I upgraded to Logos 4, two Logos sales reps told me that Logos will only be selling Logos 4 through their website and phone service.  I also heard that they are moving into the direction of being the sole distributor or products that use the Logos engine - sort of like what iTunes does with its apps.

Michael

Posts 5337
Kevin Becker | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 6 2010 5:39 AM

Logos pulled out of the resellers before the launch of L4.

http://community.logos.com/forums/t/3988.aspx

http://community.logos.com/forums/p/2324/17856.aspx#17856

Posts 1344
PL | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 6 2010 6:01 AM

That seems to go against the direction of Logos wanting to be more widely adopted among the general US Christian community...

Posts 669
Michael Lyman | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 6 2010 6:15 AM

Kevin, Thanks for the links. I can understand Bob's logic but having worked in Christian Retail for a long time I believe having no presence in bookstores will hurt in the long run. For one thing I met many brand new Christians over the years working in bookstores, one was the flagship for the state of Nebraska and the other one was at the HQ for the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, and the first place they come to begin their Christian journey is a Christian Bookstore. I sold many "starter" CD's to them and they greatly appreciated it. I think it would be wise to reconsider having a limited presence at least. Since the engine itself is free, a small collection priced between $50 and $100 would be a great idea. People who have seen Logos on the shelf for many years and no longer see it may assume it is no longer available and if they see the advantages of being digital I think you'll never realize the business you will not gain.

One other issue is that Logos never had an in-store rep come in and never came and did demonstrations at store sale events, etc that would have helped them a lot. Maybe they did and I was never aware of it. There is also part of the market that will NEVER go online to find something as good as Logos. I think the problem was marketing, not the stores themselves.

I would still like to see Logos pursue the home school market. Maybe I should look into the Ambassador program. If you all had a booth at home school conventions doing demonstrations I think you would do well. Also if you could partner with some home school curriculums like Alpha Omega you could really open up some doors for business.

Posts 4508
Robert Pavich | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 6 2010 6:22 AM

PeterLi:
That seems to go against the direction of Logos wanting to be more widely adopted among the general US Christian community...

From what Bob Pritchett said; the Christian bookstore route was just not panning out for Logos.

The "attrition" was very high (software that mysteriously disappeared and therefore Logos absorbed the loss) and the sales were very weak...it was never a large part of their market...so they decided to just severe the tie.

 

 

Robert Pavich

For help go to the Wiki: http://wiki.logos.com/Table_of_Contents__

Posts 1344
PL | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 6 2010 6:38 AM

I think they should push into Walmarts and other large retail chains, like the Purpose Driven books and other popular Christian titles.  Many large retail stores (even some supermarkets) gladly stock paper Bibles for people to buy as gifts on special occasions... why not have Logos Bible software right next to the gift Bibles as another option, especially for people buying for more tech-savvy friends or loved ones?

And how about large bookstore chains like Barnes & Noble, Borders, Chapters?  They already have a large Christian selection in each store.  And B&N and Amazon are getting into ebooks...

The possibilities are boundless, if Logos wants to grow its audience.

Posts 139
Sean Boisen | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2010 10:57 PM

Michael Lyman:
2) Have you all considered marketing it to the home school community?

Yes, we are interested in the home school community. At this point our offerings are still quite limited, however. If you have specific suggestions as to how we might strengthen our offerings in this area, I'd be glad to hear them, or you can send them to suggest@logos.com.

Posts 2828
Michael Childs | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2010 1:38 PM

This is true.  What's more, I have already seen people being steered away from Logos at Christian bookstores.  This is going to hurt market share, and it is a gift to other Bible programs.  At least that is my opinion.

There should be some entry level Logos packages available in every Christian bookstore - as a minimum. 

"In all cases, the Church is to be judged by the Scripture, not the Scripture by the Church," John Wesley

Posts 9102
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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2010 2:11 PM

PeterLi:
That seems to go against the direction of Logos wanting to be more widely adopted among the general US Christian community...

You might interpret the move as some evidence that that is not Logos' direction. I think Logos knows that  it isn't competing well against other programs that are targeted primarily at Christian lay people. Logos, from a pricing, content, and technology stand-point is above what most Christians in the pew are interested in. For many, public domain works and a few simple tools are all they ever want. For that reason Logos is putting effort into reaching people who have a much greater interest or need for in-depth Bible study, esp. with original language capability, and with modern, top-notch Biblical resources. Often word-of-mouth or a mention by a teacher or pastor counts more than a demo in a Christian book store. And in most cases you couldn't get a demo in a bookstore anyway, just a pretty box with a DVD inside.

The case can also be made that Christian bookstores are dying. People are more and more shopping on the Internet. Logos is trying to use social networking and its web presence to promote its product. I know that they have a challenge to get the word out, but they have the marketing figures to show that Christian bookstores were not productive for them.

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

Posts 3666
Floyd Johnson | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2010 2:36 PM

I would be interested in how many here got their first Logos product from a Christian Book Store - local or seminary?  I know I did - after receiving a substantial Christmas gift from the church I was pastoring.

Blessings,

Floyd

Blessings,
Floyd

Pastor-Patrick.blogspot.com

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2010 2:40 PM

Floyd Johnson:
I would be interested in how many here got their first Logos product from a Christian Book Store - local or seminary?

Bet you knew about Logos before you went to the bookstore to buy it. You could have gone online and ordered it if that was the only way available. More to the point: who learned about Logos for the first time at a bookstore?

BTW: count me as one who did not buy through a store, and learned about it through a publication.

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2010 2:48 PM

Mark A. Smith:
More to the point: who learned about Logos for the first time at a bookstore?

I did - and it was version 1.0 Big Smile

But, yes, I know what you mean.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 1646
SteveF | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2010 2:55 PM

Floyd Johnson:
got their first Logos product from a Christian Book Store

A seminary student mentioned it to me in the early 1990's -- I think she was beta testing

My local Christian bookstore gave me a $10? (sampler) - they probably paid for it themselves - in the mid 1990's .

as I was a Commodore + Amiga user back then, I could not even install it until getting my first Windows 95 machine (in early 1998?).

My first purchases (yes, from a Bookstore) was a 2.0 "Level 3" plus the stand-alone "Lesson Builder."

There was NO internet to inform me of Logos existence -- except a few hard-to-access bulletin boards or extremely expensive AOL feeds.

Even "dial-up" in my town was "slow."

Unfortunately, even Level "3" only had a couple of up to date commentaries and dictionaries. It was mostly language materials (which I had not yet stated using) or public domain stuff "dressed up" in Logos technology.

I never really started to use Logos until our denominational  Bookstore introduced me to the (purple coloured) 115 unlock Nelson Ultimate CD. Finally, more "up-to-date commentaries, dictionaries, background material etc. It was THAT CD which really helped me to 'take off" into Logos - land!

Regards, SteveF

Posts 168
Bill Gordon | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2010 5:03 PM

The increasing popularity of distance learning classes at seminaries is a great marketing opportunity for Logos. The company has the opportunity to become the theological library of choice for students.

Distance learning classes have many advantages over tradition education. Not having to quit your job, pack your belongings and move your family to a new state are just a few. However, there are disadvantages. One downside is that many students do not have access to a theological library. They are at a disadvantage when writing research papers. Logos 4 can eliminate this shortcoming. In fact, Logos can give a student an advantage over someone using a traditional library. A card catalog cannot complete with the kind of searches available in Logos 4. By the way, if you are a seminary student you need to get the Theological Journal Library volumes 1-12. When you refer to a journal article in a research paper it is far more impressive to your professor than referring to a Bible encyclopedia. I know because I have graded many papers.

Posts 18762
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2010 5:14 PM

Mark A. Smith:

More to the point: who learned about Logos for the first time at a bookstore?

I learned about it for the first time from a guy named Bob whose office was down the hall from mine and who was goofing around making some sort of Bible software thingy in his spare time. He ended up quitting his job and starting this company that makes Logos... Smile

But I've seen the boxes loads of times in bookstores and if I hadn't had the inside knowledge of the product, that would have served to increase my familiarity with the name so that when I did eventually decide to buy something, Logos would have been what I'd Google to see if there was a way to download it if I couldn't find it in stores anymore. Now that it's no longer in stores, they're relying entirely on publication advertising or word of mouth to get new customers. I guess it's been working since they've gotten a whole flurry of new customers. But I still think there would be more who would only hear about it through their local Christian store. However, the cost of keeping up that distribution channel probably isn't justified for the few more customers that might come on board that way.

I think they'd do better to focus more attention on marketing to seminary students. Loosen up their licensing agreement so seminary libraries can provide it free for all students to use while in the library. Send more trainers to do demos at seminaries for the library staff and faculty. Send Morris Proctor around to do discounted MP seminars for seminarians.

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2010 5:21 PM

Perhaps the Ambassador program will be fruitful. I think there are regional gatherings of Christians and Pastors that would be great places to show product and do demos if the right connections could be made, booths bought, etc. I've never seen a Logos booth or set-up at anywhere here in New England. I don't go to everything so may have missed it, but I think there are some direct sell opportunities that would get Logos out in front of people and whet their appetite for the product.

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

Posts 1674
Paul Golder | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2010 6:15 PM

I'm betting that Zondervan is going to "box" several different packages, and distribute them through the Family Christian Stores chain. Also they'll probably have them accessible through standard wholesale channels.

"As any translator will attest, a literal translation is no translation at all."

Posts 3810
spitzerpl | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 14 2010 12:58 AM

Rosie Perera:
I think they'd do better to focus more attention on marketing to seminary students. Loosen up their licensing agreement so seminary libraries can provide it free for all students to use while in the library. Send more trainers to do demos at seminaries for the library staff and faculty. Send Morris Proctor around to do discounted MP seminars for seminarians.

Those are some great ideas, Rosie.

Posts 5337
Kevin Becker | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 14 2010 2:53 AM

Rosie Perera:
I think they'd do better to focus more attention on marketing to seminary students. Loosen up their licensing agreement so seminary libraries can provide it free for all students to use while in the library. Send more trainers to do demos at seminaries for the library staff and faculty. Send Morris Proctor around to do discounted MP seminars for seminarians.

In the seminary I attended the main exegesis profs, the ones who teach OT and NT, Hebrew and Greek use the "other program." In fact one of them does training seminars for that program. So my impression is that to get students of this seminary you will need to get Logos in front of them in a real way, otherwise they will only see the value in the way their professors are doing things and then invest their money that way. I know there are many who can run both Logos and other programs beneficially but in seminary they are less likely because of not wanting to buy resources in multiple formats.

I once offered one of those profs to show any interested seminary students Logos and he expressed his doubts that any students would want to because no exegesis profs use it.

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