Spurgeon/Edwards

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Posts 60
Rustamania | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Feb 11 2016 5:44 PM

What would be the one or two must reads of Spurgeon/Edwards.

Thanks

Posts 176
Al Het | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 1:36 PM

If you are, or intend to be a pastor, Spurgeon's "Lectures To My Students" is outstanding, and I would consider it a "must read" among Spurgeon's stuff.  "The Soul Winner" is also really good.

Posts 2278
Andy | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2016 4:14 AM

I agree with Al Het's suggestions re: Spurgeon.

In terms of Jonathan Edwards, I would suggest that A Treatise Concerning Religious Affections and The Freedom of the Will are both important works in understanding Edwards' thought. Moreover, both works are, in my opinion, touchstones for the Neo-Calvinist movement presently resurgent in some quarters of Western Evangelicalism. 

Blessings

Posts 666
James McAdams | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2016 9:54 AM

My favourite work of Edwards is his "Dissertation Concerning the End for Which God Created the World". It's heavy going at times, but it's staggeringly good.

Posts 263
Greg Corbin | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2016 6:50 PM

Al Het:

If you are, or intend to be a pastor, Spurgeon's "Lectures To My Students" is outstanding, and I would consider it a "must read" among Spurgeon's stuff.  "The Soul Winner" is also really good.

Agree on these two recommendations and I have read alot of Spurgeon.

Posts 9090
Forum MVP
Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2016 8:49 PM

It isn't fully 'his' but I'd put the Autobiography of Charles Spurgeon near the top. His wife and secretary wrote it, but it gives insight into the man, his times, his struggles, and his impact that one can't get in his works.

One should read the works that made Spurgeon famous - his sermons. I'd recommend reading at least the first volume of The New Park Street Pulpit, dating from the beginning of his London ministry at age 19. Volume VII of The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit contains the activities surrounding the dedication of that great edifice about midway through the volume. 

Of his books, the two mentioned already are well worth reading, the first esp. if you are a pastor or minister.

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

Posts 176
Al Het | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Feb 15 2016 8:33 AM

Mark Smith:
One should read the works that made Spurgeon famous - his sermons.

I couldn't agree more with this.  I debated making the same point in my response. Spurgeon was the the best pure preacher/communicator I have ever read/heard, outside the Bible itself.  I've often wanted to try to study a bit of his homiletical method, only to find myself drawn into the content of whatever he is preaching on, and lose the focus of looking at HOW he's communicating.

Posts 943
Everett Headley | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Feb 15 2016 8:38 AM

Andy:

I agree with Al Het's suggestions re: Spurgeon.

In terms of Jonathan Edwards, I would suggest that A Treatise Concerning Religious Affections and The Freedom of the Will are both important works in understanding Edwards' thought. Moreover, both works are, in my opinion, touchstones for the Neo-Calvinist movement presently resurgent in some quarters of Western Evangelicalism. 

Blessings

Ditto.

But reading the sermons of these guys will show you that they weren't just academics, but they cared for the Glory of God deeply and that their fellow men would see and share in that knoweldge.  It think that is their true value.

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