Grammatical tagging "mistakes"? Mt 10:16

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Timothy Drawbaugh | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Mar 24 2017 7:58 PM

Recently have been exploring the grammatical tag feature in Logos. After running a Bible Word Study on serpent (Gk=ophis) one hit was Mt 10:16, "Behold, I am sending you out as sheep in the midst of wolves, so be wise as serpents and innocent as doves."

"Serpents" is tagged as a Subject, when actually the Subject is an understood "You" and "serpents" serve as an adverbial complement to "wise", i.e. how or the manner in which one is to be "wise", in the same way "doves" serves as complement to "innocent".

In a roundabout way you could try to make the argument that it qualifies as Subject if you have it take the place of the sentence complement "wise" which equals the understood Subject, "You". (You=wise, wise=serpent, therefore You=serpents(?)) However, that would be a stretch, and technically "serpents" is not the Subject.

If grammatical tagging has been done solely on the basis of the Nominative equalling Subject, then when one runs a clausal search to see how many times a particular Greek word serves as the Subject, the results may be skewed; though I'm guessing it may only limitedly do so in terms of numbers.

Just wanted to throw this out there for consideration. Any thoughts?

BTW, what does OGGR stand for under the Example Uses drop-down within a Bible Word Study result?

T.Drawbaugh

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 25 2017 1:10 AM

Timothy Drawbaugh:
BTW, what does OGGR stand for under the Example Uses drop-down within a Bible Word Study result?

It shows which grammatical database is being drawn on for this analysis

Timothy Drawbaugh:
If grammatical tagging has been done solely on the basis of the Nominative equalling Subject,

Looking at the corresponding syntax graph shows how Subject is determined

I don't know enough of the grammar to comment on that point!

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Timothy Drawbaugh | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Mar 26 2017 2:55 AM

Graham, thanks for pointing me to the syntax graph resources. Very helpful! I kind of guessed right, "serpents" being the complement of "wise" they have it graphed as Subject of the secondary clause. In short, they've broken it down and diagram the main sentence clause and subsequent secondary clauses separately. So the secondary clause is kind of like in a Star Wars Yoda quote: "Wise are serpents" the subject is "serpents". What is interesting is that the understood subject "you" is missing from the graph ("you be wise"), unlike when you diagram the sentence in the traditional manner. Thanks again!

-Timothy

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