Ancient Christian Devotional - A Year of Weekly Readings, Thomas Oden (Gen Ed)

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Scott Groethe | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Mar 28 2017 6:10 AM

Logos already has Thomas Oden Ancient Christian Commentaries

and it has many lectionaries and commentaries on lectionary readings

this fills a hole for devotionals that follow lectionaries

https://www.amazon.com/Ancient-Christian-Devotional-Readings-Lectionary/dp/0830834311

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Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 28 2017 10:10 AM

It is a very good work:

WEEK 16 Fourth Sunday in Lent

 

Light Dispels Darkness

THEME

God looks at our hearts, not our outward appearances, as he showed when choosing David as king, prefiguring Christ (1 Sam 16:1–13). Like David, we trust God; we have confidence in his protection even when we are in the midst of great difficulty (Ps 23). The light of Christ’s grace and forgiveness dispels the darkness of sin (Eph 5:8–14)—he is the light of the world (Jn 9:1–41).

OPENING PRAYER: Fourth Sunday in Lent

Permit us not, O Lord, to hear your word in vain. Convince us of its truth, cause us to feel its power and bind us to yourself with cords of faith and hope and love that never shall be broken. We bind to ourselves today, you our God: your power to hold us, your hand to guide us, your eye to watch us, your ear to hear us, your wisdom to teach us, your word to give us speech, your presence to defend us, this day and every day; in the name of the blessed Trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, to whom be the kingdom, and the power and the glory, forever and forever. Amen. Patrick

OLD TESTAMENT READING: 1 Samuel 16:1–13

REFLECTIONS FROM THE CHURCH FATHERS

David’s Kingly Anointing Prefigures Christ’s. LACTANTIUS: The Jews had before been directed to compose a sacred oil, with which those who were called to the priesthood or to the kingdom might be anointed. And as now the robe of purple is a sign of the assumption of royal dignity among the Romans, so with them the anointing with the holy oil conferred the title and the power of king. . . . On this account we call him Christ, that is, the Anointed, who in Hebrew is called the Messiah. Epitome of the Divine Institutes 4.7.

The Eyes of the Lord. TERTULLIAN: You are human, and so you know other people only from the outside. You think as you see, and you see only what your eyes let you see. But “the eyes of the Lord are lofty.” “Man looks on the outward appearance, God looks on the heart.” So “the Lord knows them that are his” and roots up the plant which he has not planted. He shows the last to be first, he carries a fan in his hand to purge his floor. Let the chaff of light faith fly away as it pleases before every wind of temptation. So much the purer is the heap of wheat which the Lord will gather into his garner. Prescriptions Against Heretics 3.

PSALM OF RESPONSE: Psalm 23

NEW TESTAMENT READING: Ephesians 5:8–14

REFLECTIONS FROM THE CHURCH FATHERS

Light Exposes Darkness. CHRYSOSTOM: He has said, you are light. Light exposes what takes place in darkness. Insofar as you are light your goodness shines forth. The wicked are not able to hide. Their actions are illuminated as though a lamp were at hand. Homily on Ephesians 18.5.11–13.

The Metaphors of Sleeping and Death. AMBROSIASTER: By sleep he signifies a stupor of the mind. The sleepers are lost from the true path. This estrangement is a kind of death, from which he calls them to rise that they may repent and acknowledge the truth, which is Christ. Thus the faithless and vicious, steeped as they are in mud without hope of life, are called to rise and come out and have a share in life with Christ, so as to pass from the shadows out to the light and from death to life. Epistle to the Ephesians 5.14.

Addressed Also to Believers Who Sleep in Sin. CHRYSOSTOM: He is not speaking only to unbelievers. For there are many believers, no less than unbelievers, who remain still trapped in various sins. There are indeed some who do so all the more. Therefore it was necessary to call these to awake, etc. Homily on Ephesians 18.4.14.

GOSPEL READING: John 9:1–41

REFLECTIONS FROM THE CHURCH FATHERS

Nothing Happens Without a Purpose. THEODORE OF MOPSUESTIA: Since the disciples had this opinion about the blind man, the Lord appropriately adjusts his speech in order to answer their question: “Who sinned, this man or his parents?” They were asking, in other words, whether this happened to him because of the sins of his parents, or because of the man’s sin—as if there was no other cause for such an event. After they asked this, the Lord taught them that there are many reasons for all these events, and that they are certainly secret and unexplainable. And so, we always complain about events whose causes we ignore, but then we also learn that nothing happens in vain. This knowledge will be given to us in the future world, because what is hidden now will be revealed to us. Commentary on the Gospel of John IV (9:3).

What Is the Cause of Suffering? CYRIL OF ALEXANDRIA: Truly, by our minds we cannot comprehend those things which are far above us. And, I should advise the prudent and myself above all to abstain from wishing to thoroughly scrutinize them. For we should recall to mind what we have been commanded and not curiously examine things which are too deep or pry into those which are too hard, or rashly attempt to discover those things which are hidden in the Divine and ineffable counsel alone. Rather concerning such matters we should piously acknowledge that there are certain wondrous things which God alone understands. At the same time we should maintain and believe that since God is the fountain of all righteousness, God will neither do nor determine anything whatsoever in human affairs, or in those of the rest of creation which is unbecoming to God or differs at all from the true righteousness of justice. Commentary on the Gospel of St. John 6.1.

You Too Come to Siloam. AMBROSE: Again, I ask you: What is he trying to convey to us by spitting on the ground, mixing his saliva with clay and putting it on the eyes of a blind man, saying: “Go and wash yourself in the pool of Siloam (a name that means ‘sent’)?” What is the meaning of the Lord’s action in this? Surely one of great significance, since the person whom Jesus touches receives more than just his sight. In one instant we see both the power of his divinity and the strength of his holiness. As the divine light, he touched this man and enlightened him; as priest, by an action symbolizing baptism he wrought in him his work of redemption. They only reason for his mixing clay with the saliva and smearing it on the eyes of the blind man was to remind you that he who restored the man to health by anointing his eyes with clay is the very one who fashioned the first man out of clay, and that this clay that is our flesh can receive the light of eternal life through the sacrament of baptism. You, too, should come to Siloam, that is, to him who was sent by the Father, as he says in the Gospel, “My teaching is not my own, it comes from his who sent me.” Let Christ wash you and you will then see. Come and be baptized, it is time; come quickly, and you too will be able to say, “I went and washed”; you will be able to say, “I was blind, and now I can see.” And, as the blind man said when his eyes began to receive the light, you too can say, “The night is almost over and the day is at hand.” Letter 67.4–6.

Two Recoveries of Sight, Two Types of Blindness. CHRYSOSTOM: In this passage he speaks of two recoveries of sight and of two types of blindness: one sensory and the other spiritual. . . . But they were intent only on the sensory things and were ashamed only of sensory blindness. Homilies on the Gospel of John 59.1–2.

CLOSING PRAYER

Christ with me, Christ before me, Christ behind me,

Christ within me, Christ beneath me, Christ above me,

Christ on my right, Christ on my left. . . .

Christ in the heart of everyone who thinks of me,

Christ in the mouth of everyone who speaks to me,

Christ in every eye that sees me,

Christ in every ear that hears me.

[Amen.]

The Canticle of St. Patrick

Ancient Christian Devotional Ancient Christian Devotional: A Year of Weekly Readings—Lectionary Cycles A, B, and C (Ancient Devotional) General Editor: Thomas C. Oden Edited by Cindy Crosby Cycle A Copyright © 2007, Cycle B Copyright © 2011, and Cycle C Copyright © 2009 by Thomas C. Oden and ICCS Published by InterVarsity Press P.O. Box 1400 Downers Grove, IL 60515-1426 All rights reserved. Used by permission. Accordance edition hypertexted and formatted by OakTree Software, Inc. Version 1.1

-dan

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Veli Voipio | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 28 2017 12:55 PM

Yes

Gold package, and original language material and ancient text material, SIL and UBS books, discourse Hebrew OT and Greek NT. PC with Windows 8.1

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