NIV Application Commentary: Galatians

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Posts 13
Stephen Feild | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Apr 10 2010 2:01 PM

Is the NIV Application Commentary sold in separate volumes?  I am interested in buying a book at a time instead of the whole set.  I am preaching Galatians right now.

Thanks - Steve

Posts 188
Si | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Apr 10 2010 2:55 PM

Stephen J Feild:

Is the NIV Application Commentary sold in separate volumes?  I am interested in buying a book at a time instead of the whole set.  I am preaching Galatians right now.

Thanks - Steve

At this point, the answer is no.  See http://www.logos.com/products/details/5459 for the complete set.  I understand your preference for individual purchases, but Zondervan has chosen to sell the NIVAC NT as a complete set only.  This is the decision of Zondervan, not Logos.    

 

Posts 1931
Donovan R. Palmer | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 11 2010 12:06 AM

Sometimes after a set has been out for a while, the option to buy individual volumes emerges.

Posts 18854
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 11 2010 12:31 AM

Donovan R. Palmer:

Sometimes after a set has been out for a while, the option to buy individual volumes emerges.

For example, the winner of this year's March Madness is a volume from the International Critical Commentary series (ICC), which is normally only sold in a set:

A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles by I. Howard Marshall (regular price $130; LMM price (75% off) = $32.50!!) -- see this page for the coupon code that will get you that discount

 

Posts 1931
Donovan R. Palmer | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 11 2010 12:50 AM

Indeed. This is a great way to kick the tyres so to speak on ICC without having to buy the entire set.

Posts 1874
Alan Macgregor | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 11 2010 3:09 AM

Stephen J Feild:
I am interested in buying a book at a time instead of the whole set.  I am preaching Galatians right now.

As I see it publishers like Zondervan and on occasions Logos, see bundling or selling in sets as a good way to generate interest and revenue through increased sales. (It seems a bit like the 3-for-2 offers you get in supermarkets all the time.)  The model is sometimes used by print publishers, especially with republished public works, like Soli Deo Gloria's 4-volume Practical Works of Richard Baxter, which I bought some years ago.

However, it is only really with the advent electronic book publishing that the model really took off. You can see the attractiveness for both purchasers and some buyers. HDD are massive enough to accommodate whole sets of commentaries in a way that bookshelves never could. It's easy to access them through a passage guide linked to the biblical portion being studied. It shifts masses of resources for publishers creating revenue streams which can fund further publishing.

The model works fine when the price is high enough to generate profitable income for the publisher and low enough to generate interest in a fairly affluent customer-base. The model begins to stutter when the price is perceived by less affluent customers as too high, either to justify (on the basis of the stewardship of scarce resources) or afford (on the basis of the price exceeds budget capabilities).

Into that mix we must factor resource realism which affects the justification of purchase. Do I really require an ICC/WBC/NIGTC for every book of the Bible/NT/OT? How much use of it am I going to make of it given its price? Let me give a current example. I have cheerfully (almost evangelically) espoused Catena Aurea, as being a wise purchase because it is a great resource at a great price. However, I have not touched Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture, because I cannot afford it, let alone justify its purchase.

Being able to buy single volumes of that or any other set would generate income for Logos from me, where the set does not. For example, I have several individual volumes of WBC, where I am unable to afford the set (much as I might like it). (Okay, it is available on Payment Plan but I do not, on principle, buy of credit)

So I say bring on the single volumes of NIV Application Commentary, I'll buy some over time, as I previously did in print..

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Posts 13
Stephen Feild | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 11 2010 3:28 AM

Alan, that is my situation.  Budget and stewardship require me to pass on what really is a good deal for the set.  It is my hope to buy a volume at a time as I preach through books of the Bible.  When I am preaching a book I regularly read 5 or more of my best commentaries after doing my own work.

But, God knows that I don't "need" it, so I will happily wait on those individual volumes.  His peace to all!

Posts 2834
Michael Childs | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 11 2010 8:10 PM

Rosie Perera:
For example, the winner of this year's March Madness is a volume from the International Critical Commentary series (ICC), which is normally only sold in a set:

Actually the ICC can be bought in Logos by individual volumes.  Rather expensive individual volumes.

 

"In all cases, the Church is to be judged by the Scripture, not the Scripture by the Church," John Wesley

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