Popular and Scholarly references

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Raymond P. Barron | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Feb 27 2018 6:28 AM

Is there a way I can determine which Logos Software references are Popular or Scholarly?

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Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 27 2018 7:03 AM

What do you mean by Logos references? Do you mean citations in books? Books logos offers? Something else?

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Raymond P. Barron | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 27 2018 7:17 AM

I used references within the Logos program and was critiqued by a fellow classmate that these references are not scholarly references. I am asking if there is a way to determine which are scholarly, popular, or devotional/commentary. 

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Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 27 2018 7:26 AM

There are different ways this can be done. A simple one is to use the classification on bestcommentaries.com as shown in the screenshot below:

Although pastoral commentaries can reflect very good scholarship, the "technical" ones are those considered more academic. 

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 27 2018 7:34 AM

Raymond P. Barron:

I used references within the Logos program and was critiqued by a fellow classmate that these references are not scholarly references. I am asking if there is a way to determine which are scholarly, popular, or devotional/commentary. 

It obviously depends on whom you ask (I suspect that higest-level scholarship coming from an evangelical perspective would be sneered at in a European university context), but there are indicators given at sites like bestcommentaries.com - and there are commentary collections for Logos resources where "academic" or technical is often used for the scholarly type.

Most often, the usage of Greek text in a Greek font rather than in transliteration, and not translated, gives away the academical/scholarly type. Anchor Yale resources and publishers like Brill are known for scholarly works, as are the Hermeneia (often seen as more liberal) or NIGTC (probably less liberal) commentaries. 

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Ryan | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 27 2018 7:36 AM

Hi Raymond,

I don't know that there is a 100% foolproof way to determine if a resource is popular or not. I suspect it may be a bit more subjective, but I could be wrong. I don't know if it helps or not, but here is a paragraph from a syllabus from a class I'm enrolled in right now that has the professor's expectations regarding how to determine if a book is scholarly or popular.

"Academic books would be books published, for example, by Zondervan Academic, Baker Academic, IVP Academic, Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, Yale University Press, P&R (though not all their books are academic), Crossway (though not all their books are academic), Eerdmans, Princeton University Press, etc. In other words, please avoid popular level books that are not written by a scholar, contain no research footnotes/endnotes, etc." 

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 27 2018 7:38 AM

No, it is more of a skill you acquire with experience. Knowing about the publisher & author is a start. Are you working at a graduate level? Undergraduate? That matters too. One suggestion: run your bibliography by your professor. That is what he or she is there for. 

You can also feel free to run questions by here. 

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