The Preacher's Notebook

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Paul Caneparo | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, Apr 4 2018 3:37 AM

Has anyone bought this yet?

https://www.logos.com/product/148398/the-preachers-notebook-the-collected-quotes-illustrations-and-prayers-of-john-stott

I've spent my budget for this month (& next) so would be interested in comments on how useful this appears for sermon illustrations in case I should pick up while on sale.

I'd also be interested in seeing the table of contents.

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 4 2018 5:17 AM

Paul Caneparo:
Has anyone bought this yet?

I have it but haven't really looked at it yet

Paul Caneparo:
I'd also be interested in seeing the table of contents.

Hopefully this helps

Posts 818
Paul Caneparo | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 4 2018 5:49 AM

Graham Criddle:

Paul Caneparo:
Has anyone bought this yet?

I have it but haven't really looked at it yet

Paul Caneparo:
I'd also be interested in seeing the table of contents.

Hopefully this helps

Thanks Graham

I saw this post on the blog last month.

https://blog.logos.com/2018/03/organized-mind-john-stott/#more-88618

I'm going to use (but adapt) the illustration below in my next sermon.  I'd love to know whether there are many such illustrations - or whether the quotes you've provided are more typical, as the type of illustration below is more useful to me as a preacher.

Not scales, but the cross

Themes: Forgiveness; Good Works; Jesus: Death; Justice; Justification
Crossing Waterloo Bridge and looking northeast, one has a fine view of the city skyline, and in particular of those two domed buildings, the Old Bailey (the central criminal court) and St. Paul’s Cathedral (the mother church). At the pinnacle of each dome is mounted a significant symbol. At the top of the Old Bailey stands the classical god of justice—blindfolded (for impartiality), wielding the sword of justice in her right hand, and holding a pair of scales (for the sifting of evidence) in the left. At the top of St. Paul’s however, is a great golden cross.

Many people think Christianity is a religion of the scales. They imagine that every time they sin, God flicks it into one pan, while every time they do a good deed, he flicks it into the other. And they are hoping against hope that the scales may just tip down in their favor.

But no, Christianity is not a religion of scales, but of the cross. For if the scales stand for our unfinished works, the cross stands for the finished work of Christ. It tells us Christ died for our sins once for all, that we are forgiven. It invites us to come to Christ saying, “Nothing in my hand I bring.”

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 4 2018 6:09 AM

Paul Caneparo:
I'm going to use (but adapt) the illustration below in my next sermon.  I'd love to know whether there are many such illustrations - or whether the quotes you've provided are more typical, as the type of illustration below is more useful to me as a preacher.

It's difficult to answer this from a quick look through but the comment below might give some guidance:

The cards also occasionally record stories and illustrations of the more classic kind—including the odd opening joke (which he occasionally termed a “warm-up”). However, the notes suggest he did this less and less over time.

Mark Meynell, “John Stott: A Preacher of Methodical Genius,” in The Preacher’s Notebook: The Collected Quotes, Illustrations, and Prayers of John Stott, ed. Mark Meynell (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2018).

And then there are sections like:

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Paul Caneparo | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 4 2018 6:21 AM

Thanks Graham

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