Morph Search Question: Two and Three-Termination Greek Adjectives

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Jonathan Ray | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Apr 23 2018 5:39 PM

Is there a way to search for all two and three-termination Greek adjectives, either through a morph search or some other way? An example of a three-termination adjective would be καλός, καλή, καλόν because it can take the masculine, feminine, and neuter grammatical genders. To indicate this in BDAG, the headword is listed as καλός, ή, όν.

This question extends to irregular verbs as well. How would one locate all the second aorist and second perfect verbs?

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 23 2018 9:59 PM

Jonathan Ray:
Is there a way to search for all two and three-termination Greek adjectives, either through a morph search or some other way?

Personally would search for @J (adjective agrees with word being modified in gender, number, and case)

Jonathan Ray:
How would one locate all the second aorist and second perfect verbs?

One way is searching A Parsing Guide to the Greek New Testament

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 24 2018 12:38 AM

If you mean that the termination is based on gender (implying two-termination is any two, but not all three, genders) then there is a partial solution. The main issue is that you need a Search that will span the whole NT in order to find ALL such adjectives. Morph Query is flexible but restricted to 5 verses, whilst Morph Search is unsuitable and restricted to one chapter. That leaves Syntax Search with the flexibility of Agreement operators and a considerable span. But have I understood you?

Dave
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Jonathan Ray | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 24 2018 6:05 AM

Dave Hooton:
But have I understood you?

Yes, you are spot on. I was thinking Syntax Search but wrote Morph Search! 

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 24 2018 12:12 PM

Dave Hooton:
The main issue is that you need a Search that will span the whole NT in order to find ALL such adjectives.

Morph Search for Adjective (@J) can be done for NT with Analysis of results grouped by lemma and gender:

Adjectives used three times of more will have at least one gender used (a number of them have two OR three genders from modifying different substantives).

Adjectives used twice have at most two genders (analysis results shows majority have one gender).

Hapax Legomena adjectives (appear once in NT) have one gender.

FYI: reducing result size on macOS 10.13.4 (to include more results in screen shot) causes collapse/expand triangle to disappear.

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Jonathan Ray | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 24 2018 1:48 PM

This is a very clever solution. Thank you, Dave!

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Lee | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 25 2018 12:12 PM

I'm curious as to why you need to perform this search. Is there a thesis you are trying to support?

The search queries suggested so far are good, but they suffer from one flaw: some results may be left out (that deserve to be placed in the same grammatical/linguistic category) if there are not enough instantiations in the biblical corpus of those adjectives or verbs or whatever. In other words, the results you're getting may not be water-tight.

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 25 2018 2:04 PM

Jonathan Ray:
Is there a way to search for all two and three-termination Greek adjectives, either through a morph search or some other way?

Do you want a list of those adjectives, or do you want to find where those adjectives in the NT? I'm asking whether a search of BDAG or other lexicon would meet your needs?

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Jonathan Ray | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 25 2018 7:50 PM

Mark Barnes:
Do you want a list of those adjectives, or do you want to find where those adjectives in the NT? I'm asking whether a search of BDAG or other lexicon would meet your needs?

A list of those adjectives would be sufficient. There was a Daily Dose of Greek vidoe recently that  mentioned there were X number of two-termination adjectives (I forget the exact number). I was wondering how exactly that author found that number and what those adjectives were.

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