Why do I need a $300 encyclopedia?

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This post has 9 Replies | 2 Followers

Posts 660
Dale E Heath | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Aug 2 2018 9:38 AM

This month, there are 2 big encyclopedias on sale.

https://www.logos.com/product/55228/encyclopaedia-britannica-collection

https://www.logos.com/product/138245/the-eerdmans-encyclopedia-of-early-christian-art-and-archaeology

With all the bible dictionaries and encyclopedias that I already have in Logos and the availability of information on the WWW, I don't see any reason to purchase either of these.

Does anyone see any good reason to add either of these to their personal library?

Just curious, Dale Heath

Posts 3164
Forum MVP
PetahChristian | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 2 2018 9:42 AM

See Britannica? for some recent feedback regarding the first product.

I don't know about the other one.

Posts 36
Anthony Sims | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 2 2018 10:13 AM

Dale E Heath:

This month, there are 2 big encyclopedias on sale.

https://www.logos.com/product/55228/encyclopaedia-britannica-collection

https://www.logos.com/product/138245/the-eerdmans-encyclopedia-of-early-christian-art-and-archaeology

With all the bible dictionaries and encyclopedias that I already have in Logos and the availability of information on the WWW, I don't see any reason to purchase either of these.

Does anyone see any good reason to add either of these to their personal library?

Just curious, Dale Heath

Personally, no. The Britannica is fine, but you can get a subscription to their website for $35 for the first year and $75/year after that. It's continuously updated (not sure if Logos articles are?) and includes every one of their articles, which the Logos version does not. The question comes down to whether or not you want the Logos tagging and all that...I was able to say no after using Britannica's website and I really enjoy it.

Maybe I didn't spend enough time in the Eerdmann's encyclopedia, but $400 is too much for what it offers. Its sale price of $294 is less than what it was on pre-pub, so you'll probably never see it again at this price.

Finney's first book on art is only $10 for a used copy and is actually sufficient for what I need. https://www.amazon.com/Invisible-God-Earliest-Christians-Art/dp/0195113810/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1533229292&sr=1-3 

Posts 6222
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 2 2018 3:52 PM

Personally I don’t need neither one 👍😁👌

DAL

Posts 87
Michael Sullivan | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 2 2018 5:14 PM

Depending on where you live, you may be able to access Britannica for free through your local library's website.  The state of Wisconsin does this, as do a few US states.  Other than the possibility of have Britannica indexed and tagged with other LOGOS resources, there is no need for me to purchase this resource - especially considering that it isn't the full Britannica.

Posts 1576
Kenute P. Curry | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 2 2018 6:51 PM

Personally. I don't need them either.

Posts 1823
mike | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 2 2018 7:42 PM
  1. How much have you spent on your monthly allowance this month?
  2. Are you gonna be out of budget by the end of the month?
  3. Are you saving money for retirement?
  4. Does your job require you to have this?
  5. How many encyclopedia do you have already currently in Logos?
  6. Have you seen, browse or read all the encyclopedia in your Logos?
  7. How are you going to benefit from this than other encyclopedias that are cheaper?
  8. Do you really have the time to read all the Logos resources + this new encyclopedia?
  9. Have you prayed for this decision?
  10. Do you think this resource will be included in Logos 8 this month for $1/resource?

If you're still convinced after this, you're the true Logosian! :)

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jk

Posts 3648
Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 3 2018 1:54 AM

I would not spend the money on Britannica because I can find the type of information it supplies across other resources in Logos and online. I realise that having it in Logos means that it would be interfacing with other tools (Factbook, Topic Guide, Timelines, etc.) but this is not sufficient to justify the cost for me. 

The dictionary of art and archaeology is a tool that can be very useful but I suspect would not be for many users. Many Christians are happy with their understanding of the faith as they have received it and it is presented / maintained in their tradition. Interest in early art and archaeology goes in pair with taking initiative to understand better what early Christians were doing and believed. It is a type of primary source that complements literary evidence such as what is found in early Christian writings such as the Early Fathers and in Greek papyri of the period. Some users who are inherently interested in history and art will find it fascinating to read these articles. For others, who want to use this as a reference tool and access point to the evidence, it takes a certain commitment to formulate what one is looking for and to pursue the answers. 

For instance, it can be useful to consider the evidence of the use of the name of Jesus among early Christians. How was His Name used in exorcisms for instance? There are bowls and other materials that suggest that some (perhaps non-Christians) thought that the Name had intrinsic power and could be invoked much like the sons of Sceva did in Acts. For many Christians, "in Jesus' Name" is a traditional ending to prayers much like "Amen" and its sense or purpose may be vague. The same applies to some popular how-to's on deliverance ministry today which often are not well-researched when it comes to such questions. So, this would be an issue for which a dictionary like this can provide an entry point.

Considering that the answers can sometimes rock the boat, most will opt to stay "safely" away or just don't want to do anything that requires too much work (incl. some self-training) and is not spoon-fed to them. 

For my part, although I would find this evidence useful but don't have the time or money to engage this in particular at this time, so I have to pass for now. 

Posts 2243
Jan Krohn | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 3 2018 2:41 AM

I bought the EBNE when it was originally on pre pub for $100, and I'm mostly happy about it.

I don't think it's worth $270 though, unless you know that you're gonna use it intensively.

And of course Murphy's Law always applies. If you ever need a certain article, it's for sure one of those that's not included. Like recently, when I needed the article about Tacitus. D'oh...

Past IT Consultant. Past Mission Worker. Entrepreneur. Future Seminary Student.
Why Amazon sucks: Full background story of my legal dispute with the online giant

Posts 18
Lucian Benigno | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 3 2018 10:07 AM

I have mixed feelings about EBNE (Encyclopaedia Britannica Noet Edition).

I bought it some months ago with a coupon for $174.38. Surely the fact that 3/4 of my favourite articles are lacking takes away almost all of the fun of it, but the Compton's that came along is somewhat a consolation prize.

Surely it would be great if EBNE was really integrated with, say, the Timeline, but noet, I can't see any EBNE results there.

I don't know why some people have to pay or need some special privilege to access the Britannica online, but when I go to the official site, I see two options: use Britannica straight for free, or try with a login (and pay) for an ad-free experience. I never signed in or tried the paid option, but I think I have access to all the real thing for free. I do this:

And this is what I get:

Please don't get me wrong. I love Logos, I'm grateful for all the free and quality resources, and I love almost everything I have bought here. Nevertheless, I read somewhere that EBNE is an acronym that means "excellent, but not enough" and I'm inclined to agree.

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