Free Revised Edition

Page 2 of 2 (25 items) < Previous 1 2
This post has 24 Replies | 2 Followers

Posts 81
LogosEmployee
Doug Mangum | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 26 2018 4:19 PM

Textual Criticism of the Bible [TCB] was initially designed as a digital-only resource. As we progressed with the Lexham Methods Series, Lexham Press started to transition to publishing books in print as well as digital. The other volumes in the Series were designed to work as digital resources and as print books. With the series complete and three volumes heading to print, we had an opportunity to update the content of TCB as we prepared it for print. 

So why a revised edition? First, Wendy Widder and I are both Old Testament scholars. After finishing the first edition of TCB, we were keenly aware that the treatment of NT textual criticism was not as up-to-date and nuanced as it would have been with input from an experienced NT text critic. Amy Anderson enthusiastically agreed to review, revise, and update the chapters on methodology and NT text criticism to reflect the current state of the field. Second, there have been a number of important publications in biblical textual criticism for both OT and NT that have come out (or come to our attention) in the years since the manuscript was first drafted (early 2012). So we also took the opportunity to revise and update the OT chapter to cover some of those recent publications and account for some new perspectives that had not been on our radar back in 2012.

In the process of revising the book and preparing it for print, I removed the lists of links because that was a feature that had been dropped in subsequent volumes of the series. Partly due to print concerns (who likes looking at a list of hyperlinks on a printed page?) and partly because it felt like the lists were duplicating information you could get from Factbook or the Topic Guide. I wasn't sure that people found them all that helpful, and I felt like I'd overdone it with info-overload giving links to very similar articles in a variety of sources (and people seem to react negatively to the lock icon). 

For now the Logos edition will match the print as far as the links go, but we plan to get the resource updated with the correct color images. Eventually, I'd like the Logos editions of the Lexham Methods Series to be enhanced eBook editions with more links, images, Logos integration, etc. But I didn't want to wait for that to get you all the great, new updated content in this revised edition.

Posts 3153
Mattillo | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 26 2018 4:55 PM

Doug Mangum:

Textual Criticism of the Bible [TCB] was initially designed as a digital-only resource. As we progressed with the Lexham Methods Series, Lexham Press started to transition to publishing books in print as well as digital. The other volumes in the Series were designed to work as digital resources and as print books. With the series complete and three volumes heading to print, we had an opportunity to update the content of TCB as we prepared it for print. 

So why a revised edition? First, Wendy Widder and I are both Old Testament scholars. After finishing the first edition of TCB, we were keenly aware that the treatment of NT textual criticism was not as up-to-date and nuanced as it would have been with input from an experienced NT text critic. Amy Anderson enthusiastically agreed to review, revise, and update the chapters on methodology and NT text criticism to reflect the current state of the field. Second, there have been a number of important publications in biblical textual criticism for both OT and NT that have come out (or come to our attention) in the years since the manuscript was first drafted (early 2012). So we also took the opportunity to revise and update the OT chapter to cover some of those recent publications and account for some new perspectives that had not been on our radar back in 2012.

In the process of revising the book and preparing it for print, I removed the lists of links because that was a feature that had been dropped in subsequent volumes of the series. Partly due to print concerns (who likes looking at a list of hyperlinks on a printed page?) and partly because it felt like the lists were duplicating information you could get from Factbook or the Topic Guide. I wasn't sure that people found them all that helpful, and I felt like I'd overdone it with info-overload giving links to very similar articles in a variety of sources (and people seem to react negatively to the lock icon). 

For now the Logos edition will match the print as far as the links go, but we plan to get the resource updated with the correct color images. Eventually, I'd like the Logos editions of the Lexham Methods Series to be enhanced eBook editions with more links, images, Logos integration, etc. But I didn't want to wait for that to get you all the great, new updated content in this revised edition.

Thank you for that update Doug! I for one like the extra links though I understand why you removed them. I'll cross my fingers for a future ebook enhanced edition

Posts 413
Leo Wee Fah | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 26 2018 6:41 PM

Doug Mangum:

For now the Logos edition will match the print as far as the links go, but we plan to get the resource updated with the correct color images. Eventually, I'd like the Logos editions of the Lexham Methods Series to be enhanced eBook editions with more links, images, Logos integration, etc.

That would be great! Yes

Posts 3033
Milkman | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Oct 27 2018 5:23 AM

Thanks for the explanation regarding the revision. 

It's unfortunate that the links have been removed, not withstanding other ways to glean the information. Personally, it's easier for the user to select the link from within the resource rather than going through the numerous steps of Factbook or Topic Guides. I would think that making a product easier to use for the customer is always a beneficial thing. I'm not sure that removing a feature, like the links, was the smartest choice with the customer in view.

You mention that ppl don't like looking at hyperlinks on print editions. Just doing a comparison between the two versions, it seems that the links are only at the end of each chapter. So if someone doesn't like looking at them, they simple turn the page and move on.

The pictorial inserts actually were a nice addition. It breaks up the page and gives the eye a rest. A short break distracts the brain, refreshes it and then moves on the learn better. 

Your second rationale for removing them was that you weren't "sure" that ppl found them helpful. Did you get comments or complaints about that to make your decision?

I wonder is there anyway to 'hide' the links if ppl are adverse to them?

As far as the lock icon is concerned. I personally like them. First. How is the customer to know which resource/book is needed for further study? Sure I can select the hyperlink in the revised edition but then if I don't have that then it's either going to open a web page or open a sample copy or open a box in the resource. Just another step which makes it more cumbersome for the user. So you're really not removing a potential "negative" you're just removing an icon. Also, taking away said icons removes the "at a glance" feature. I for one don't want to see if I have a resource for further study by either going to my library and searching for it. Nor do I want to open another web page or down load a sample copy. It seems that more steps have been added. Makes it harder for the customer.

I like seeing what I don't have at a glance. If I'm really keen on the subject to which I'm studying, I want as many resources possible. Bookaholic? Yes, but a long (20 years) faithful customer of yours. It's a challenge to me see how many lock icons I can get rid of and replace them with book icons. I can't tell you the number of resources I purchased just by seeing and wanting to rid the page of lock icons. 

I'm glad to hear that you plan to update the revised edition with colour images. Who doesn't like to look at coloured pictures in books?

mm.

Doug Mangum:

Textual Criticism of the Bible [TCB] was initially designed as a digital-only resource. As we progressed with the Lexham Methods Series, Lexham Press started to transition to publishing books in print as well as digital. The other volumes in the Series were designed to work as digital resources and as print books. With the series complete and three volumes heading to print, we had an opportunity to update the content of TCB as we prepared it for print. 

So why a revised edition? First, Wendy Widder and I are both Old Testament scholars. After finishing the first edition of TCB, we were keenly aware that the treatment of NT textual criticism was not as up-to-date and nuanced as it would have been with input from an experienced NT text critic. Amy Anderson enthusiastically agreed to review, revise, and update the chapters on methodology and NT text criticism to reflect the current state of the field. Second, there have been a number of important publications in biblical textual criticism for both OT and NT that have come out (or come to our attention) in the years since the manuscript was first drafted (early 2012). So we also took the opportunity to revise and update the OT chapter to cover some of those recent publications and account for some new perspectives that had not been on our radar back in 2012.

In the process of revising the book and preparing it for print, I removed the lists of links because that was a feature that had been dropped in subsequent volumes of the series. Partly due to print concerns (who likes looking at a list of hyperlinks on a printed page?) and partly because it felt like the lists were duplicating information you could get from Factbook or the Topic Guide. I wasn't sure that people found them all that helpful, and I felt like I'd overdone it with info-overload giving links to very similar articles in a variety of sources (and people seem to react negatively to the lock icon). 

For now the Logos edition will match the print as far as the links go, but we plan to get the resource updated with the correct color images. Eventually, I'd like the Logos editions of the Lexham Methods Series to be enhanced eBook editions with more links, images, Logos integration, etc. But I didn't want to wait for that to get you all the great, new updated content in this revised edition.

mm.

Posts 81
LogosEmployee
Doug Mangum | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Oct 29 2018 10:38 AM

Milkman:

It's unfortunate that the links have been removed, not withstanding other ways to glean the information. Personally, it's easier for the user to select the link from within the resource rather than going through the numerous steps of Factbook or Topic Guides. I would think that making a product easier to use for the customer is always a beneficial thing. I'm not sure that removing a feature, like the links, was the smartest choice with the customer in view.

I appreciate this feedback. It's definitely part of my long-term plan to bring back some of those features for the digital resource.

Page 2 of 2 (25 items) < Previous 1 2 | RSS