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George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jun 25 2009 12:08 PM

Bohuslav Wojnar:
Hmm... while being in Afrika and Afghanistan, I was glad we have that promise of protection Smile

Yes, I have experienced that as well.  In many ways I have led a charmed life.  Some minor injuries, but it seems that I have been preserved from any major catastrophe.  Thanks be to God.

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

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Bohuslav Wojnar | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jun 25 2009 12:44 PM

So, back to the question. Do you think the certainty of our proofs that the text is not original, is at the same level with both those scripture portions?

Bohuslav

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 8:53 AM

Bohuslav Wojnar:

So, back to the question. Do you think the certainty of our proofs that the text is not original, is at the same level with both those scripture portions?

I heard a Bible scholar discuss this once. He reported that Sinaiticus (I think that was the one) had a blank section after the accepted ending of Mark, as if that scribe (at least) knew there was something missing. It's possible that what we have in the minority texts is an attempt to reconstruct the original, missing ending.

If the majority texts are right, Mark's ending is certainly odd. Kind of reminds me of an old Monty-Python skit: "And suddenly, nothing happened" or in the case of Mark "Immediately, nothing happened."

Makes me wonder, what if some archeologist stumbles on the correct ending of Mark. Would we be able to accept it? How close would it resemble what we have?

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

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George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 9:11 AM

Richard DeRuiter:

Bohuslav Wojnar:

So, back to the question. Do you think the certainty of our proofs that the text is not original, is at the same level with both those scripture portions?

I heard a Bible scholar discuss this once. He reported that Sinaiticus (I think that was the one) had a blank section after the accepted ending of Mark, as if that scribe (at least) knew there was something missing. It's possible that what we have in the minority texts is an attempt to reconstruct the original, missing ending.

If the majority texts are right, Mark's ending is certainly odd. Kind of reminds me of an old Monty-Python skit: "And suddenly, nothing happened" or in the case of Mark "Immediately, nothing happened."

Makes me wonder, what if some archeologist stumbles on the correct ending of Mark. Would we be able to accept it? How close would it resemble what we have?

I know of a fellow on the Textual Criticism list named "James Snapp" who has put this forward.  I wouldn't precisely call him a scholar, but he's continually attempting to establish the validity of such things as the Pericope Adultera and the ending of Mark.  I think the archives are open so you could find it.  The problem for his position is that this is not the only "blank" following the ending of a work.  I believer there is also one after Tobit if memory serves.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/textualcriticism/

 

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 11:07 AM

George Somsel:

I know of a fellow on the Textual Criticism list named "James Snapp" who has put this forward.  I wouldn't precisely call him a scholar, but he's continually attempting to establish the validity of such things as the Pericope Adultera and the ending of Mark.  I think the archives are open so you could find it.  The problem for his position is that this is not the only "blank" following the ending of a work.  I believer there is also one after Tobit if memory serves.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/textualcriticism/

George, I wasn't trying to establish the validity of anything. And you may know more than I do about this. The ending of Mark in the majority text does seem a bit abrupt, and unsatisfying -- like a piece of avant guarde music. Maybe this was Mark's intention. As these works were typically read in public settings, ending on a disonant chord, invites, if not requires, questions as we know the story can't possibly end there (how would we know the women were too afraid to say anything, unless they bravely said something later).

Still, somehow, it doesn't seem right to end a Gospel on the sour notes of fear and silence.

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

Posts 9947
George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 11:25 AM

Richard DeRuiter:

George Somsel:

I know of a fellow on the Textual Criticism list named "James Snapp" who has put this forward.  I wouldn't precisely call him a scholar, but he's continually attempting to establish the validity of such things as the Pericope Adultera and the ending of Mark.  I think the archives are open so you could find it.  The problem for his position is that this is not the only "blank" following the ending of a work.  I believer there is also one after Tobit if memory serves.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/textualcriticism/

George, I wasn't trying to establish the validity of anything. And you may know more than I do about this. The ending of Mark in the majority text does seem a bit abrupt, and unsatisfying -- like a piece of avant guarde music. Maybe this was Mark's intention. As these works were typically read in public settings, ending on a disonant chord, invites, if not requires, questions as we know the story can't possibly end there (how would we know the women were too afraid to say anything, unless they bravely said something later).

Still, somehow, it doesn't seem right to end a Gospel on the sour notes of fear and silence.

Obviously you aren't alone in feeling that way since we have more than one ending.  Perhaps that was the point -- invite questioning.

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

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