Michael Heiser Workflow Question

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This post has 3 Replies | 2 Followers

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jwsheets | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Nov 30 2019 12:20 PM

Hi,
I have all the workflows that are available. I already have my own workflow when approaching a text so I haven't used the provided ones...yet. But the Heiser workflow piqued my interest. Since I haven't used the workflows, can someone who has used them suggest how best to utilize the Heiser workflow? Is it a stand-alone or does it need to be complemented by one or more of the other workflows? Thanks in advance for any direction.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Dec 7 2019 10:53 PM

bump

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 131
jwsheets | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2019 5:03 AM

Is bump a theological code word? ;-)

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DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2019 10:51 AM

jwsheets:

Hi,
I have all the workflows that are available. I already have my own workflow when approaching a text so I haven't used the provided ones...yet. But the Heiser workflow piqued my interest. Since I haven't used the workflows, can someone who has used them suggest how best to utilize the Heiser workflow? Is it a stand-alone or does it need to be complemented by one or more of the other workflows? Thanks in advance for any direction.

Workflows are not provided as are with the only guidance contained within the workflow itself. It's up to the user whether and their purpose in studying the text in question as to whether they want to use any particular workflow as a stand-alone study or in conjunction with others workflows. Before using any workflow I would recommended doing your own work first by reading the text multiple times, in different translations across the spectrum of translation philosophies, even across denominational boundaries and also make use of the text comparison tool, making note of where translations differ, jotting down any questions you might have as you read through each translation, not matter how simple or complex they might be and note any topics / concepts in the text that get your attention.  Having done this pre-work will enable you to get the most out of any workflow. It may or may not give some direction in which workflow to start with and whether or not you might need to look at multiple workflows or that might come after having worked through one workflow.  Or you might jump into the Factbook to further dive into a topic or Word Study or Passage Guide. For me there are no hard and fast rules and workflows are just a means to get started in studying the scriptures and I don't rely upon them as a way I have to do things every time or in any hard and set order.

I know this is not the direct step by step answer you might have been looking for and maybe someone else might offer their view but hopes this is of use in someway or at least stimulates further discussion on your question if nothing else from others who take a different approach to workflows.

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