SUGGESTION: Help me keep in mind the comparative usefulness of contemporaneous literature

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Nov 30 2019 6:00 PM

When doing word study one often turns to cognates defined by Wikipedia as:

In linguistics, cognates are words that have a common etymological origin. Cognates are often inherited from a shared parent language, but they may also involve borrowings from some other language. 

Knowing the relationship between the languages of the cognates is important but often not something a Logos user knows off the top of their head for the languages of the actual Biblical text, early Bible translations, and the contemporary literature of the Biblical text. Therefore, I would appreciate it if Logos supplied a stripped down language tree of the relevant languages. Something like a more complete and artistic version of:

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 30 2019 7:58 PM

Excellent idea MJ.  If I may ask, from where did you extrapolate this picture—I love it!

Pardon my ignorance here, but is this tree serving to demonstrate the evolution of the biblical languages?  If so, why do they not stop at Aramaic, Hebrew & Greek?  I am almost certainly just not comprehending.

Just trying to understand these trees.  You turned me on to them and I am really piqued by them, but fear they’re a bit above my pay grade 🤓.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 30 2019 8:33 PM

Puddin’:
 If I may ask, from where did you extrapolate this picture—I love it!

I took most of the base from Wikipedia but had to borrow from multiple sources for the Afro-Asiatic tree which is less established than the Indo-European tree. Yes, the trees demonstrate the evolution of the language families. https://www.theguardian.com/education/gallery/2015/jan/23/a-language-family-tree-in-pictures is a good resource dealing with contemporary languages that illustrates how they work.

Puddin’:
 If so, why do they not stop at Aramaic, Hebrew & Greek?

I could have but I wanted to include:

  1. Biblical languages
  2. Languages contemporary to the Biblical languages in Logos for cognates and related literature
  3. Languages of early translations that have significant use (Latin, Syriac, Greek, Old Church Slavonic) in liturgical churches or have significant manuscripts (Gothic, Arabic, Coptic, Ge'ez) ... I omitted Armenian, Georgian , and Sogdian as I don't think FL has and resources in those languages.

In short, I was building an example so the rules could be as arbitrary as I wanted. Wink

Puddin’:
Just trying to understand these trees.  You turned me on to them and I am really piqued by them, but fear they’re a bit above my pay grade 🤓.

They really aren't difficult, just unfamiliar ... just remember that as you work from trunk to branches to twigs (to the right as I drew mine) you are moving through time closer and closer to contemporary.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 319
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 30 2019 9:05 PM

Ok MJ—that’s what I suspected😉.  Very instructive though (I actually saved that tree to my photos).  

I have a cantillation tree in my Logos library, but, that thing feels like I have a Ferrari motor—w. a smart car driver 😳!

Also gave a cascadia graph that has my attention, but, again, not sure how to use it.  

I really like your point about the categorical distinction between something that’s “unfamiliar” vs. something that’s “difficult.”  I would say we probably conflate these separate categories often subconsciously.

Sure wish I could hire a private tutor to teach me—hey, wait...hmmmm 🤔🤔!

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