Finding some info on a Greek word

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Carmen Gauvin-O'Donnell | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Aug 21 2020 3:22 AM

Hey all! Here's the scenario: I'm reading a book in Logos (The Parousia, by J.S. Russell) Of course this was written at a time when scholars simply wrote a Greek or Hebrew word since everyone seemed to know what the word was, so they wouldn't bother writing a translation.

My problem is that I do not speak Greek so can't really understand the import of what he's saying in this sentence:

"The article τοῖς seems as if the two witnesses were well known, and distinct in their individuality. The δυσίν is essential to the prophecy, and is not to be explained away."

If I right-click on the words and do a search I get thousands of results where those words appear, which isn't helpful as it often includes Greek bibles etc.

Q. Is there a way to do a search, set up a collection of specific resources, whatever... so that I can quickly find a Greek/Hebrew word translated and defined in English, preferably with a transliteration so that I can learn how to pronounce those various Greek letters as I go? If yes, what resource(s) would you recommend?

THANKS! Geeked Happy Friday!

Posts 1416
HJ. van der Wal | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 21 2020 3:37 AM

Shalom Carmen!

The easiest way would be to buy an analytical (Hebrew or Greek) lexicon, e.g. The Lexham Analytical Lexicon to the Greek New Testament.

"The "analytical" portion provides listings and counts of every form of every Greek word, parsed and declined, with links back to primary entries."

Posts 11309
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 21 2020 8:40 AM

Probably not germaine to Carmen's question, but adding to HJ, the greek analyticals in Logos typically are NT only. You can run into trouble with an odd greek word in the LXX, PG, and Perseus volumes. So it goes.

I always prioritize my analyticals (hebrew, greek, syriac, latin) below the respective lexicons, to 'catch' the odd non-lemma I don't recognize.

"God will save his fallen angels and their broken wings He'll mend."

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 21 2020 12:29 PM

Denise:
adding to HJ, the greek analyticals in Logos typically are NT only. You can run into trouble with an odd greek word in the LXX

However, besides an Analytical Lexicon of the GNT (actually more than one), there's also a Lexham Analytical Lexicon of the LXX

Running Logos 9 latest (beta) version on Win 10

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HJ. van der Wal | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 21 2020 12:49 PM

HJ. van der Wal:

Slightly off topic but I also want to recommend the free Dictionary of Latin Forms. This resource will be of great use when you encounter Latin text in a resource.

Posts 11309
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 21 2020 1:19 PM

NB.Mick:

Yes .. I forgot that one ... if I remember right, Rick expanded the NT one or visa versa with the LXX one.

"God will save his fallen angels and their broken wings He'll mend."

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Forum MVP
Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 21 2020 1:57 PM

Carmen Gauvin-O'Donnell:
"The article τοῖς seems as if the two witnesses were well known, and distinct in their individuality. The δυσίν is essential to the prophecy, and is not to be explained away."

Personally have Information Tool configured to update on click so clicked δυσίν in The Parousia followed by clicking δύο in Information to open/position Lexham Analytical Lexicon to the Greek New Testament (prioritized high in my list as the Analytical Lexicon includes Greek and Hebrew related words)

Hovering over JDPF shows "adjective, dative, plural, feminine". Thankful for two Greek Grammatical summary resources => Greek New Testament Insert and => Chapman's New Testament-Greek Notebook having explanations with examples

HJ. van der Wal:

Slightly off topic but I also want to recommend the free Dictionary of Latin Forms. This resource will be of great use when you encounter Latin text in a resource.

For example, dramatis personæ in The Parousia. Analytical Lexicon of the Vulgate does not have dramatis

Denise:

NB.Mick:

Yes .. I forgot that one ... if I remember right, Rick expanded the NT one or visa versa with the LXX one.

Keep Smiling Smile

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