BHS with Richter morphology

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Feb 19 2011 6:48 PM

All who have Scholar's Silver and above have a license for the BHS with Richter Morphology with a promise to deliver the volume when available. Has anyone briefed us lately on an expected delivery date?

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

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fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 20 2011 5:02 AM

Thanks for bringing this up! I only found out about this resource yesterday (when I happened to look at the Update Chart), and, like you, I wondered when "soon" was, but also about the morphology itself. Do you -- or anyone else reading this -- know of somewhere where the differences between different morphologies are described?

"The Christian way of life isn't so much an assignment to be performed, as a gift to be received."  Wilfrid Stinissen

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David Knoll | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 20 2011 5:15 AM

fgh:

Thanks for bringing this up! I only found out about this resource yesterday (when I happened to look at the Update Chart), and, like you, I wondered when "soon" was, but also about the morphology itself. Do you -- or anyone else reading this -- know of somewhere where the differences between different morphologies are described?

 

Richter's impressive project was described at length in:

Rechenmacher, H. and van der Merwe, C. H. J., The Contibution of Wolfgang Richter to Current Developments in the Study of Biblical Hebrew. J Semitic Studies (Spring 2005) 50 (1): 59-82.

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fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 20 2011 6:10 AM

David Knoll:
Richter's impressive project was described at length in:

Thanks, but I was more interested of "in short" than "at length". Smile Not 5 lines short, but considerably shorter than 24p. At least at this stage. Also, I'm looking for a comparison of all Logos morphologies, rather than a description of one of them.

"The Christian way of life isn't so much an assignment to be performed, as a gift to be received."  Wilfrid Stinissen

Mac Pro OS 10.9.

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 20 2011 11:00 AM

fgh:
Do you -- or anyone else reading this -- know of somewhere where the differences between different morphologies are described?

No I don't, but I found an interesting 12 page read on the issues it seems Richter was trying to address here: http://www.ajol.info/index.php/actat/article/viewFile/5462/29600  While not saying so, I assume this refers to the 'morphology' Richter developed.

Here is a quote of the relevant passage:

Richter (1978, 1979 and 1980) proposed an entirely
redefined theoretical frame of reference for the description of BH grammar
at the level of word, phrase and clause. Richter did not disregard existing
insights into the grammar of BH, but argued, very much in the spirit of
the structuralist paradigm, that current grammatical categories need to be
scrutinised in terms of the distribution of the BH data at hand. The only way
to have effective access to this data was to develop a linguistic database, and
for this purpose Richter divided the entire BH corpus into clauses.

A key notion in Richter’s clause syntax was that of “valency”. The valency
of a verb determines the number and type of constituents a clause may
have, e.g. “sleep” has a valency of 1 since it requires only a subject in order
to form a full sentence, “see” has a valency of 2 since it requires a subject
and an object. It was this element of meaning that Richter used as the main
criterion for the identification of verbal clauses in his database. In this
regard, Richter was in step with insights from the field of general linguistics,
viz. syntax without information from the lexicon is not possible.

Richter’s approach was not well-received by scholars in the field of Old Testament
studies. Most of the criticism from these scholars was not justified
because they did not fully understand what Richter had tried to accomplish.
However, there is also justifiable criticism that can be brought
against Richter. Nevertheless, apart from providing the impetus for a
range of research programmes, he made an important contribution as far as
the implementation of insights generated in terms of the structuralist paradigm
to the description of BH as a non-spoken language is concerned, e.g.
• He provided a solid foundation for the redefinition of BH word classes
and sentence constituents in terms of distributional criteria;
• He paved the way for more clearly defined levels of linguistic description
in the field of study;
• He illustrated the importance of considering some of the syntactic features
of a verb in the composition of a lexicon.

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

Posts 912
David Knoll | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 20 2011 12:03 PM

Mark A. Smith:

fgh:
Do you -- or anyone else reading this -- know of somewhere where the differences between different morphologies are described?

No I don't, but I found an interesting 12 page read on the issues it seems Richter was trying to address here: http://www.ajol.info/index.php/actat/article/viewFile/5462/29600  While not saying so, I assume this refers to the 'morphology' Richter developed.

Here is a quote of the relevant passage:

Richter (1978, 1979 and 1980) proposed an entirely
redefined theoretical frame of reference for the description of BH grammar
at the level of word, phrase and clause. Richter did not disregard existing
insights into the grammar of BH, but argued, very much in the spirit of
the structuralist paradigm, that current grammatical categories need to be
scrutinised in terms of the distribution of the BH data at hand. The only way
to have effective access to this data was to develop a linguistic database, and
for this purpose Richter divided the entire BH corpus into clauses.

A key notion in Richter’s clause syntax was that of “valency”. The valency
of a verb determines the number and type of constituents a clause may
have, e.g. “sleep” has a valency of 1 since it requires only a subject in order
to form a full sentence, “see” has a valency of 2 since it requires a subject
and an object. It was this element of meaning that Richter used as the main
criterion for the identification of verbal clauses in his database. In this
regard, Richter was in step with insights from the field of general linguistics,
viz. syntax without information from the lexicon is not possible.

Richter’s approach was not well-received by scholars in the field of Old Testament
studies. Most of the criticism from these scholars was not justified
because they did not fully understand what Richter had tried to accomplish.
However, there is also justifiable criticism that can be brought
against Richter. Nevertheless, apart from providing the impetus for a
range of research programmes, he made an important contribution as far as
the implementation of insights generated in terms of the structuralist paradigm
to the description of BH as a non-spoken language is concerned, e.g.
• He provided a solid foundation for the redefinition of BH word classes
and sentence constituents in terms of distributional criteria;
• He paved the way for more clearly defined levels of linguistic description
in the field of study;
• He illustrated the importance of considering some of the syntactic features
of a verb in the composition of a lexicon.

\

This refers to his grammar in three volumes.  His morphology is based on the grammar but includes much much more. If Logos contracted the whole database, expect the ability to search noun patterns, Aramaisms, morpho syntactic features  and  practically anything you can think about...

Posts 912
David Knoll | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 20 2011 12:04 PM

Mark A. Smith:

fgh:
Do you -- or anyone else reading this -- know of somewhere where the differences between different morphologies are described?

No I don't, but I found an interesting 12 page read on the issues it seems Richter was trying to address here: http://www.ajol.info/index.php/actat/article/viewFile/5462/29600  While not saying so, I assume this refers to the 'morphology' Richter developed.

Here is a quote of the relevant passage:

Richter (1978, 1979 and 1980) proposed an entirely
redefined theoretical frame of reference for the description of BH grammar
at the level of word, phrase and clause. Richter did not disregard existing
insights into the grammar of BH, but argued, very much in the spirit of
the structuralist paradigm, that current grammatical categories need to be
scrutinised in terms of the distribution of the BH data at hand. The only way
to have effective access to this data was to develop a linguistic database, and
for this purpose Richter divided the entire BH corpus into clauses.

A key notion in Richter’s clause syntax was that of “valency”. The valency
of a verb determines the number and type of constituents a clause may
have, e.g. “sleep” has a valency of 1 since it requires only a subject in order
to form a full sentence, “see” has a valency of 2 since it requires a subject
and an object. It was this element of meaning that Richter used as the main
criterion for the identification of verbal clauses in his database. In this
regard, Richter was in step with insights from the field of general linguistics,
viz. syntax without information from the lexicon is not possible.

Richter’s approach was not well-received by scholars in the field of Old Testament
studies. Most of the criticism from these scholars was not justified
because they did not fully understand what Richter had tried to accomplish.
However, there is also justifiable criticism that can be brought
against Richter. Nevertheless, apart from providing the impetus for a
range of research programmes, he made an important contribution as far as
the implementation of insights generated in terms of the structuralist paradigm
to the description of BH as a non-spoken language is concerned, e.g.
• He provided a solid foundation for the redefinition of BH word classes
and sentence constituents in terms of distributional criteria;
• He paved the way for more clearly defined levels of linguistic description
in the field of study;
• He illustrated the importance of considering some of the syntactic features
of a verb in the composition of a lexicon.

\

This refers to his grammar in three volumes.  His morphology is based on the grammar but includes much much more. If Logos contracted the whole database, expect the ability to search noun patterns, Aramaisms, morpho syntactic features  and  practically anything you can think about...

Posts 9947
George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 20 2011 12:49 PM

fgh:

David Knoll:
Richter's impressive project was described at length in:

Thanks, but I was more interested of "in short" than "at length". Smile Not 5 lines short, but considerably shorter than 24p. At least at this stage. Also, I'm looking for a comparison of all Logos morphologies, rather than a description of one of them.

You also need a subscription to the journal in order to read the article or else purchase one-time access.

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 20 2011 1:17 PM

David Knoll:
This refers to his grammar in three volumes.  His morphology is based on the grammar but includes much much more. If Logos contracted the whole database, expect the ability to search noun patterns, Aramaisms, morpho syntactic features  and  practically anything you can think about...

That's good to know. There is precious little about this I could find online.

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

Posts 912
David Knoll | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 20 2011 2:02 PM

George Somsel:

\You also need a subscription to the journal in order to read the article or else purchase one-time access.

 

George,

Email me \

Posts 468
BKMitchell | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jun 18 2012 12:52 AM

Has, anyone heard or read anything about The BHS with Richter Morphology, recently?

 

חַפְּשׂוּ בַּתּוֹרָה הֵיטֵב וְאַל תִּסְתַּמְּכוּ עַל דְּבָרַי

Posts 912
David Knoll | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 2 2012 8:44 PM

Mark Smith:

All who have Scholar's Silver and above have a license for the BHS with Richter Morphology with a promise to deliver the volume when available. Has anyone briefed us lately on an expected delivery date?

 

I see that Richter was omitted from the new Logos 5 packages. I for one relied on the Logos promise to deliver the Richter morphology. It seemed (and still seems) as a promising new step for Hebrew morphological tagging.

 Is this the way it works? You promise something and once you get paid you forget to deliver? a bit disappointing...

Posts 8893
fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 2 2012 8:57 PM

I don't have any update, but it looks to me like it's still there:

"The Christian way of life isn't so much an assignment to be performed, as a gift to be received."  Wilfrid Stinissen

Mac Pro OS 10.9.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 2 2012 9:05 PM

I would still expect it. But I suspect that ... Vincent answered below.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Vincent Setterholm | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 2 2012 9:14 PM

The BHt is included in some of the larger Logos 5 base packages, but when we deliver it, anyone who ordered it as part of a Logos 4 package will receive it also, regardless of whether or not their Logos 5 package includes that title.

The analyzed text is nearly ready and I expect this project to be at the top of my tasklist very soon. Sorry for the delay!

Posts 912
David Knoll | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 3 2012 6:59 AM

Thank you. I apologize. I expected it to be part of the equivalent package to the package I own and with all this complaining going on I jumped into conclusions. Pardon!

Posts 8893
fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Nov 4 2012 1:46 PM

Vincent, the Catholic comparison chart shows Richter Hebrew Morphology and WIVU Hebrew Morphology, but doesn't mention BHS anywhere that I can see. Is that correct?

"The Christian way of life isn't so much an assignment to be performed, as a gift to be received."  Wilfrid Stinissen

Mac Pro OS 10.9.

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Louis St. Hilaire | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Nov 4 2012 3:47 PM

fgh:
Vincent, the Catholic comparison chart shows Richter Hebrew Morphology and WIVU Hebrew Morphology, but doesn't mention BHS anywhere that I can see. Is that correct?

See my answer here.

Posts 433
Vincent Setterholm | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Nov 4 2012 4:04 PM

fgh:
Vincent, the Catholic comparison chart shows Richter Hebrew Morphology and WIVU Hebrew Morphology, but doesn't mention BHS anywhere that I can see. Is that correct?

Short answer:

The WIVU Hebrew Morphology is on the BHS, the proper name of the Richter Hebrew Morphology is Biblia Hebraica transcripta (BHt), which for the 39 books they share in common, is closely related to the BHS, being based on the same manuscript. (BHt also includes Sirach, which is not in the BHS.)

Long answer:

Excepting the Dead Sea Scrolls biblical materials, all of our Hebrew Bibles (LHB, Westminster, AFAT, BHS SESB, BHS/WIVU, BHt (excepting Sirach), the BHQ fascicles) are based on the same manuscript, Codex Leningradensis (AKA B19 AKA L) - the oldest complete Hebrew Bible. This is the same Bible/manuscript that the print Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (BHS) is based on (as well as some other print editions, such as BHL). There are slight differences between the different print and digital editions of L when it comes to whether or not to correct things that look like scribal errors in L. The print BHS makes a few more corrections than, say, the Westminster text (which sticks very close to L, though it footnotes places where L may be defective). The different digital editions have some additional differences in how K/Q readings are handled (as interlinear runs, in note pop-ups, only following the written K text, keeping the K text as it exists in the manuscript, but sometimes analyzing the text according to a preferred Q reading, etc.) - in most some cases these differences reflect the source files we received, while some are happenstances based on our implementation of the source files.

Some digital texts have called themselves 'BHS' in the past, but really aren't. The older Westminster editions all had BHS in the title. At some point early in their history, the Westminster text may have matched the BHS, but for a long time now they've moved their text closer to L. Sometimes you'll hear their text called the WLC (Westminster Leningrad Codex), but I believe this refers to a particular view of their data that doesn't include things like Kethiv reconstructions, but rather just contains the data in the manuscript of L. Future versions of the Westminster text will likely be named BHW to avoid any confusion (and to avoid paying an extra royalty for the use of the name 'BHS' on a text that isn't really the BHS). Even some newer texts that originate from the German Bible Society and call themselves BHS may include a few very minor corrections that aren't in any print edition of BHS, though they may show up in BHQ.

What makes the BHS one of the Bibles of choice amongst scholars is not primarily the text (though it is a good one, most of editions of L are very nice in their own way), but the critical apparatus and the Massorah - all the marginal notes and footnotes.

The only complete edition that includes the apparatus (and the in-text indicators for looking up information in the apparatus) is the BHS SESB. This does not include the Massorah that is found in the print BHS. The BHQ fascicles are a work in progress, but they do contain the Massorah. (I think there are also Massorah notes in the print BHS that do not come from L, but from other manuscript traditions. I haven't dug into BHQ to know precisely which Massorah they are reproducing - only those from L or from the broader tradition. But eventually there will be a complete set of Massorah notes of some kind in the BHQ - and if I remember right, they're translating that material so that non-specialists can access it. Nice!)

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Nov 4 2012 4:39 PM

Vincent Setterholm:
Long answer:

Whew. Well that about covers it for me. Tongue Tied

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

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