Ampersand preceding letter C that is "&c"

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Fr. Mike Garcia | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Mar 3 2012 6:40 PM

Hello. Does anyone know why many of the resources in Logos 4 have the Ampersand and letter C at the end of sentences?

Example:

Questioning together,” &c. 

Why then do the Pharisees?” &c.

And as it is written of the Son of man,” &c., 

(“And they have done to him,” &c.; see Matt. 17:12.) 

The above are only a few examples from one source. That source has many more. I've also discovered this in other resources. Any ideas?

In Christ,

Mike

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Ward Walker | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 3 2012 7:09 PM

the old way of saying et cetera?

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 3 2012 7:18 PM

Michael Garcia:
Hello. Does anyone know why many of the resources in Logos 4 have the Ampersand and letter C at the end of sentences?

Ward is right. This seems to have been the convention a long time ago. I see it often when reading Jonathan Edwards. The ampersand (&) and the Latin word "et" can both be translated by the English word "and." The Latin "et cetera" means "and the rest" or "and the remaining." We typically use "etc." as the the abbreviation nowadays, and we typically mean by it: "and so forth."

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

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Fr. Mike Garcia | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 3 2012 8:19 PM

Richard DeRuiter:
Ward is right. This seems to have been the convention a long time ago. I see it often when reading Jonathan Edwards. The ampersand (&) and the Latin word "et" can both be translated by the English word "and." The Latin "et cetera" means "and the rest" or "and the remaining." We typically use "etc." as the the abbreviation nowadays, and we typically mean by it: "and so forth."

Thank you Ward and Richard for the quick response.

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Rick Brannan (Faithlife) | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 5 2012 6:11 AM

Hi folks

Just a little follow-up. The glyph "&" which we call an ampersand actually has its roots as a ligature for the Latin word "et". That is, it is a single combination of the two letters. This is why &c. is equivalent with etc. Connect the bottom of the 'e' with the cross of the 't' and you can start to see it.

For more than you ever wanted to know about the ampersand: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampersand

Rick Brannan
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Jack Caviness | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 5 2012 6:22 AM

Rick Brannan:
Just a little follow-up. The glyph "&" which we call an ampersand actually has its roots as a ligature for the Latin word "et". That is, it is a single combination of the two letters. This is why &c. is equivalent with etc. Connect the bottom of the 'e' with the cross of the 't' and you can start to see it.

I am certain that bit of knowledge will be useful—somewhere, sometime. Since I no longer frequent bars, I don't know when Big Smile

Anyway, thanks for the information

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fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 5 2012 6:40 AM

Jack Caviness:
I am certain that bit of knowledge will be useful—somewhere, sometime. Since I no longer frequent bars, I don't know when Big Smile

I have never heard the word ampersand before in my life -- what an utterly weird word! -- but of course I know that & is a Latin et. I thought everyone did. GeekedBig Smile

 

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Fr. Mike Garcia | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 5 2012 8:22 AM

Rick Brannan:

Hi folks

Just a little follow-up. The glyph "&" which we call an ampersand actually has its roots as a ligature for the Latin word "et". That is, it is a single combination of the two letters. This is why &c. is equivalent with etc. Connect the bottom of the 'e' with the cross of the 't' and you can start to see it.

For more than you ever wanted to know about the ampersand: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampersand

Thanks for the information.

 

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 5 2012 9:54 AM

fgh:
I have never heard the word ampersand before in my life

Since you have only read about it online now, I guess you STILL haven't heard the word ampersand. Stick out tongue

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fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 5 2012 10:07 AM

alabama24:
Since you have only read about it online now, I guess you STILL haven't heard the word ampersand. Stick out tongue

How do you know I didn't try to pronounce it? I can hear myself, you know. Stick out tongue

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 5 2012 10:21 AM

fgh:
I can hear myself, you know.

I didn't know if you would admit talking to yourself. Smile

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Jack Caviness | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 5 2012 10:33 AM

fgh:
I can hear myself, you know.

Hearing yourself is a weird experience when you first begin to wear hearing aids—however, you youngsters would not know that. Geeked

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fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 5 2012 10:45 AM

alabama24:
I didn't know if you would admit talking to yourself. Smile

How do you learn pronunciation without pronouncing?

Besides, don't you remember how weird people found it when they saw Augustine reading without moving his lips? I read my English sentences half aloud all the time. It helps me weed out a few more errors.

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 5 2012 11:00 AM

fgh:
Besides, don't you remember how weird people found it when they saw Augustine reading without moving his lips?
 

It seems that Augustine was the one being astonished and he wrote about Ambrose in his Confessions:

But when he was reading, his eye glided over the pages, and his heart searched out the sense, but his voice and tongue were at rest. 

logosres:confessions;ref=Confessions.Book_6,_Chapter_3

I got my hint from here: http://www.qi.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=10389&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=15&sid=e9126b8908928402073272cf6a586e7a since I only vaguely remembered the "William of Baskerville" character in "The name of the rose" doing that and fired off google...

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fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 5 2012 11:13 AM

NB.Mick:

fgh:
Besides, don't you remember how weird people found it when they saw Augustine reading without moving his lips?
 

It seems that Augustine was the one being astonished and he wrote about Ambrose in his Confessions:

Then I guess it was I who didn't remember... Embarrassed (At least Augustine was in the story. Smile)

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 5 2012 11:14 AM

fgh:
How do you learn pronunciation without pronouncing?

By Listening. I practice by speaking. Cool Smile

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