CP - Elliot's Horae Apocalypticae in Revelation set

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Posts 645
Dean J | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Mar 16 2012 6:30 AM

Called 'the standard work' on Revelation by Spurgeon, this work, by Edward Bishop Elliott, offers the best historicist exposition of the book of Revelation, and has never been surpassed, containing 10,000 references to ancient and modern works.

Want to know why for hundreds of years, Protestant expositors identified the angel of the bottomless pit and the plague of locusts who torment for five months with the rise of Islam?

Want a history of apocalyptic interpretation, beginning with the church fathers, and through the medieval period and reformation to the author's time? 

Want a discussion of the major millennial interpretations? 

This is the place to go.

He also offers a comprehensive refutation of preterism.

An abridgment sells on Amazon for $26. Here we have the four complete volumes, plus 23 other volumes.

This set is currently at $160 for the set, but with just a few more bids at $50, and $50 will be the new price, so if you're interested, be sure to bid at $50:

http://www.logos.com/product/8522/classic-commentaries-and-studies-on-revelation

Posts 557
Jesse Blevins | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 16 2012 8:29 AM

I am in at 50. Thanks for the info.

 

Posts 1784
Tom | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 16 2012 8:30 AM

Dean053:

Called 'the standard work' on Revelation by Spurgeon, this work, by Edward Bishop Elliott, offers the best historicist exposition of the book of Revelation, and has never been surpassed, containing 10,000 references to ancient and modern works.

Want to know why for hundreds of years, Protestant expositors identified the angel of the bottomless pit and the plague of locusts who torment for five months with the rise of Islam?

Want a history of apocalyptic interpretation, beginning with the church fathers, and through the medieval period and reformation to the author's time? 

Want a discussion of the major millennial interpretations? 

This is the place to go.

He also offers a comprehensive refutation of preterism.

An abridgment sells on Amazon for $26. Here we have the four complete volumes, plus 23 other volumes.

This set is currently at $160 for the set, but with just a few more bids at $50, and $50 will be the new price, so if you're interested, be sure to bid at $50:

http://www.logos.com/product/8522/classic-commentaries-and-studies-on-revelation

Looks Good at 50 Big Smile

www.hombrereformado.org  Solo a Dios la Gloria   Apoyo

Posts 645
Dean J | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 16 2012 2:27 PM

It's getting very close!

Posts 1178
David Wilson | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 16 2012 5:29 PM

Not only Elliot's four volume Horea Apocalypticae, but ALSO Hengstenberg's two volume set !!

The Revelation of St. John, Vol. 1

  • Author: E. W. Hengstenberg
  • Publisher: Robert Carter
  • Publication Date: 1852
  • Pages: 589

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Biblical scholar E. W. Hengstenberg turns his attention to the book of Revelation in this commentary. Seeking not a typical rationalistic or traditional reading of this book, Hengstenberg provides a fresh exposition. He wrote this volume for anyone who wishes to read and understand Revelation, presenting a concise and highly readable commentary. Hengstenberg looks at the historical context, the thoughts of previous theologians, and the influence of the Old Testament. He also provides a comprehensive introduction, and a systematic reading and analysis of each chapter.

E. W. Hengstenberg was born in 1802 in Germany. He was a philosopher, philologist, Lutheran theologian. Hengstenberg became a professor of theology at the University in Basel, Germany. A prolific writer and scholar, he died in 1869.

The Revelation of St. John, Vol. 2

  • Author: E. W. Hengstenberg
  • Publisher: Robert Carter
  • Publication Date: 1853
  • Pages: 610

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Hengstenberg concludes his extensive compendium on Revelation, beginning with a discussion of the Beast from the Sea. After an exposition of the New Jerusalem, he examines the background and historical context of St. John and the writing itself. He finishes with an essay on the authenticity of the book as a whole.

Posts 1178
David Wilson | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 16 2012 5:32 PM

AND, if that were not enough, also a volume by Ewald:

Revelation: Its Nature and Record

  • Author: Georg Heinrich Ewald
  • Translator: Rev. Thomas Goadby
  • Publisher: T & T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1884
  • Pages: 493

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Prominent German scholar and theologian Georg Heinrich Ewald provides an academic lens for this complicated book of the New Testament. Approaching the text from a scientific point of view, Ewald examines Revelation and religion in light of historical and social contexts. There are three sections:

  • The Nature of the Revelation of the Word of God
  • Revelation in Heathenism and in Nature
  • Revelation in the Bible

He covers topics such as true community, stages and results of revelation, and the influence of the Holy Spirit. Believing that the Bible is the inspired Word of God, and that a social and historical understanding can illuminate our understanding of it, Ewald presents a readable yet academic reading for the book of Revelation.

Georg Heinrich Ewald was a German theologian and professor who specialized in Asian studies, the Old Testament, and philosophy. He was born in 1803, son of a linen weaver. Professor at the University of Göttingen for ten years, Ewald was expelled for protesting against King Ernst August. He went on to become a professor at Tübingen, but returned to Göttingen after the liberal constitution was put in place again. Ewald wrote several scholarly works, including The History of Israel and Prophets of the Old Testament. He died in 1875, after a long and fruitful academic career.

Posts 645
Dean J | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 17 2012 4:46 AM

Interesting, I've not heard  of Ewald but I did some research on the concept of inspiration in Homer, Hesiod, and Plato, so this should be interesting. 

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