Catholic resources that are languishing in community pricing - did you miss them?

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, May 21 2014 2:30 AM

American Catholic Saints Collection (10 vols.)

A New Commentary on Holy Scripture Including the Apocrypha (Anglican)

Enchiridion Patristicum by Rouet de Journel

1917 Code of Canon Law Collection (10 vols.)

The Lives of the Popes in the Early Middle Ages (19 vols.) by Horace K. Mann

The History of the Popes from the Close of the Middle Ages (40 vols.) by Ludwig Pastor

Kenrick's Translation of the Vulgate with Commentary (6 vols.) by Francis_Patrick_Kenrick

Library of Religious Biography (10 vols.) by Edward H. Thompson

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Deacon Steve | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 21 2014 3:38 AM

I had missed the New Commentary.  Thanks for posting this.

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MikeG53 | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 21 2014 6:33 AM

Don't forget The Catholic Encyclopedia

Smile

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Brandon Rappuhn | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 21 2014 9:26 AM

Yes indeed! I am dying to have Kenrick and Ludwig Pastor in my library. But don't also forget the Neo-Scholastic Theology and Philosophy Collection (24 vols.) which is crucial for any student of Catholic theology at university (or wannabe students, like me).

If you're interested in more Catholic writers, these two collections might be worth a glance (coincidentally, both were first Anglican):

Select Works of Robert Hugh Benson (12 vols.)

The Works of Basil William Maturin (5 vols.)

I also want to point out one more thing that is Catholic: 

The Glories of the Catholic Church (3 vols.)

While there are better things out there that analyze and study the Catholic Church, John Gilmary Shea is one foremost American Catholic reference writers/historians of the late 1800s. It's kind of a strange book, though, in its pseudo-American patriotic interpretation of American Catholic history (a Catholic justification of manifest destiny?), but this is just a personal opinion of mine. Volume 2 contains a very interesting and readable Q&A-style catechism of doctrine and Catholic teaching and practices, but the collection also contains other writings, like Pope Leo XIII's encyclical Providentissimus Deus (and a couple more of his encyclicals) and a paraphrase of Alphonsus Ligouri's The Glories of Mary and some of Ligouri's other writings. It's a rather eclectic smattering of Catholic studies in doctrine and American Catholicism in general, but at least it's interesting--and it contains an interesting Catholic response to political and philosophical trends of the day, such as Know-Nothingism.

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SineNomine | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 21 2014 3:50 PM

Brandon Rappuhn:
But don't also forget the Neo-Scholastic Theology and Philosophy Collection (24 vols.) which is crucial for any student of Catholic theology at university (or wannabe students, like me).

As a Thomist who wrote an undergraduate philosophy thesis relying heavily on neo-scholastic authors (and a present student of neo-scholastic theology), I unfortunately have to say that this collection is not crucial. Neo-scholasticism is; these authors...less so. With the exception of Cardinal Mercier, whose two listed volumes I own in hard copy, I do not recall ever either hearing or reading about any of the authors of those particular works outside of the context of Logos. Perhaps the other 22 volumes are very useful works - I certainly hope so - but it is very difficult to call them crucial.  This is why I haven't yet put a bid in for this work, even though I could afford it and have a particular interest in some of their contemporaries. Maybe if the projected price drops to $20 USD or my budget goes up.

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