What's the Deal with the Daily Deal?

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David Paul | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, May 21 2014 7:30 PM

Does anyone know what the value of this resource is? Isn't most of what this book provides trumped by what Logos is and does? Or is this more of a history of Biblical helps?

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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 21 2014 7:46 PM

It is a survey of biblical helps, and it shows how to use them. It's somewhat dated but still useful. But the product description page REALLY needs updating (it mentions "Libronix" and it talks about how "all Scripture passages are linked to your favorite Bible translation in your library." Well, this isn't a book where Scripture passages are mentioned at all in any important way. Only in passing. In other words, you wouldn't ever use this book to study a Scripture passage.)

Here's an excerpt to give you an idea:

The Use of the Septuagint

→ Multipurpose Tools: Additional Resources, Chapter 5

“OF WHAT USE is the Septuagint to me in my Biblical studies?” The question echoes in the halls of biblical inquiry. “I have my Rahlfs; what do I do with it?”

There is enough in the LXX to appeal to almost anyone. Lovers of sound textual criticism will find here a deep sea of alluring opportunity. Students of theology will be intrigued by the subtle alterations of the text effected by the Alexandrians. Old Testament interpreters will appreciate the light shed by this version on obscure words and syntax. Philologists will note the evolution of meanings. As for New Testament expositors, lavish are their endowments; they will have new visions, dream new dreams.

It is well that users of the LXX thoroughly familiarize themselves at the outset with the varying systems of reference in the printed texts of the LXX occasioned by departure from the chapter and verse divisions found in the MT and vernacular versions. These variations are traceable, in part, to the vagaries of printers before the divisions of the biblical text had been more or less standardized and, in part, to deviations of the LXX text from that of the MT.

The major differences between the divisions of the LXX and the MT are to be found in the Psalms and Jeremiah. Since Psalms 9 and 10 of the MT are printed as one psalm in editions of the LXX, the enumeration from Psalm 10 to Psalm 146 in the LXX is one chapter short of the MT. A division of Psalm 147 (MT) into Psalms 146 and 147 in the LXX restores the MT chapter division.

The dislocations in Jeremiah are more complicated, but with a little patience one can easily master them. It must be remembered that the MT divides Jeremiah into fifty–two chapters. The LXX introduces its translation of chaps. 46–51, with liberal rearrangement of the contents, at 25:13* and continues with its enumeration as if no transposition had taken place. Jeremiah 25:13b*, 15–38* (MT) is picked up again (chap. 32 LXX) after chaps. 46–51 (MT) have been translated, but the editors of the LXX, in order to maintain the versification of the MT, must begin a new chapter and omit the numbers 1 to 12. The words ὅσα ἐπροφήτευσεν Ιερεμιας ἐπὶ πάντα τὰ ἔθνη, which form a part of 25:13* (MT), were dropped in the LXX’s translation of that verse but are recovered here and marked off as v. 13*. Since 25:14* (MT) is not translated, the verse number is omitted in order that the enumeration of both texts in 25:15* and succeeding verses might correspond. From that point on through chap. 51 the LXX’s chapter enumeration is seven figures higher than that of the MT. Chapter 52 in the LXX coincides with that of the MT, since only chaps. 46–51 had suffered a shift. Rahlfs marks all departures from the MT’s division of the text with ) Except in works such as Bauer’s lexicon where versions other than the LXX are the exception, it is customary, when citing the LXX, to give in parentheses the MT’s enumeration wherever it varies from the Greek version.


Danker, F. W. (1993). Multipurpose tools for Bible study (Rev. and expanded ed., pp. 77–78). Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press.

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Unix | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, May 23 2014 4:42 PM

I bought the resource and want to read it in Libronix. Surely there has been a file but not anylonger. Can someone who has it since before email it? info ÁT cykeltaxi DÓT se :

Rosie Perera:
It is a survey of biblical helps, and it shows how to use them. It's somewhat dated but still useful. But the product description page REALLY needs updating (it mentions "Libronix" and it talks about how "all Scripture passages are linked to your favorite Bible translation in your library."

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