What commentary is a good straight through read?

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James Hiddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 19 2015 9:32 AM

Veli Voipio:

I started to read the Tyndale commentaries series (the paper version) about 10 years ago, and I am half-way through, alternatively reading the NT and OT volumes.

https://www.logos.com/product/8593/tyndale-commentaries 

In my opinion, this is a good starting point, then I am ready to meet any theological views and I can ponder additional interpretations, historical background information and original language details

Thanks Yes

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 19 2015 10:49 AM

Mark Barnes:

Mark Smith:
Karen Jobes: Esther in NIV Application Commentary. From a former Sunday School teacher turned seminary professor. Has thought through a lot of the ethical issues in the book and practical application.

Ooh, yes. This is superb. One of the best commentaries on any book of the Bible I have ever read.

You'd also enjoy George on Galatians if you haven't read him, yet. You can appreciate his writing even if you don't agree with all he has decided.

Jobes makes me think that non one should be allowed to write a non-technical commentary who hasn't already spent a few years teaching adults in a church setting.

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

Posts 116
Tanner Thetford | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 19 2015 10:57 AM

Lots of good feedback here. I'd just like to throw in that I read through Welwyn on Job: The Storm Break: Job Simply Explained by Derek Thomas, and really enjoyed it. I suspect other Welwyn commentaries would be similar.

Posts 1359
Edwin Bowden | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 19 2015 1:05 PM

Clifford B. Kvidahl:

While I rarely read a commentary from cover to cover, I can say the the following were some of the ones I found to be quite enjoyable:

George Guthrie, Hebrews (NIVAC): In my opinion this is the best commentary in the whole series. It is the perfect blend of scholarly and practical, and it more like a monograph and less like a commentary.

Cliff

Guthrie's introduction alone is worth the price of the volume. It is the best I have ever read for any commentary. 

Posts 1083
JohnB | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 19 2015 1:46 PM

Wow!!

Thanks so much for all of your suggestions. I had no thoughts as to any specific book, just a commentary about a book that had been enjoyable and rewarding when read through from beginning to end. When I wrote the post I was sitting the the waiting area of our local hospital (my wife who was waiting to have routine tests) looking at my tablet and the riches of my Logos library. I was  thinking that there was so much there that must be worth reading as a book and not just as a 'look up' to a bible passage. I now have plenty of suggestions to work from (most of which I already have).

Thanks again!!

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Jack Caviness | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 19 2015 2:29 PM

JohnB:
Can anyone recommend a good non-technical commentary as a good straight through read

Barber, Cyril J. Job: The Sovereignty of God and the Suffering of Man. Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2013 was a super read. I especially liked his Something to Think About comments at the end of each section.

Job is one of those book where you can become so fascinated with the trees that you lose sight of the forest. Barber does a good job of keeping things in perspective (the play on words was unintentional Stick out tongue)

Posts 595
Pam Larson | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 19 2015 2:40 PM

I'm enjoying the new-covenant-commentary-series. So far I've finished the ones on Ephesians and Colossians.

Posts 525
Kent | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 19 2015 3:39 PM

If your looking for an easy read, the Holman New Testament Series doesn't get any easier and is still a good read.

Posts 19219
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 19 2015 5:59 PM

I've only ever read two commentaries straight through, but I would recommend both of them:

Peterson, Eugene H. First and Second Samuel. Westminster Bible Companion. Westminster John Knox Press, 1999.

Waltke, Bruce K., and Cathi J. Fredricks. Genesis: A Commentary. Zondervan, 2001.

Posts 1518
Josh | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 26 2015 8:43 AM

Any commentary from John J. Davis would be excellent to read through.

Here is his bio: http://drjohndavisministries.com/bio.htm

Here are some of his books:

Prison to Paradise: Studies in Genesis

Moses and the Gods of Egypt: Studies in Exodus

Conquest and Crisis: Studies in Joshua, Judges, and Ruth

Israel from Conquest to Exile: Joshua - 2 Kings

If you would like to see John J. Davis' work in Logos....visit this Logos suggestion thread and give it a thumbs up! 

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/31175/659448.aspx

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Levi Durfey | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 26 2015 8:46 AM
Mark Barnes:
But the very best 'read-through' IMO is Dale Ralph Davies' six commentaries from Joshua-2Kings in the Focus on the Bible series. They can't be beat.
Thanks Mark for the recommendation—I started reading Davies on Joshua after you posted this, and I must say, excellent reading!
Posts 5317
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 26 2015 10:07 AM

Rosie Perera:

I've only ever read two commentaries straight through, but I would recommend both of them:

Peterson, Eugene H. First and Second Samuel. Westminster Bible Companion. Westminster John Knox Press, 1999.

Waltke, Bruce K., and Cathi J. Fredricks. Genesis: A Commentary. Zondervan, 2001.

The entire Westminster Bible Companion Series series is fantastic although I have not read any fully yet. Years ago I read Pocket Bible Commentary by William Neil and NIV Compact Bible Commentary by John H. Sailhamer. Both were extremely enjoyable and very insightful, Neil's was actually originally published in 1961 as Harper's Bible Commentary. Over the years I have also read entire Biblical books out of the The Expositor’s Bible Commentary (EBC) (insightful but occasionally a bit dry in some areas) and the New Interpreter’s Bible (indeed one day I hope to read all 12 Volumes cover to cover, it by far my favourite series and offers great scholarship and deep theological reflections). 

-Dan

.

Posts 13417
Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 26 2015 10:13 AM

Integ:
Mark Barnes:
But the very best 'read-through' IMO is Dale Ralph Davies' six commentaries from Joshua-2Kings in the Focus on the Bible series. They can't be beat.
Thanks Mark for the recommendation—I started reading Davies on Joshua after you posted this, and I must say, excellent reading!

Glad you're enjoying it Smile.

Posts 3736
BillS | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 26 2015 10:25 AM

I started reading NICOT's Isaiah 1-39 & Isaiah 40-66  as a technical commentary, but from almost the beginning of its nearly 1800 pages, I ended up in a devotional space. Even though the technical is there if I wanted it, the devotional attitude continued all the way through. By the end, my understanding of the OT's support for Jesus as Messiah was transformed.

Blessings!

Grace & Peace,
Bill


MSI GF63 8RD, I-7 8850H, 32GB RAM, 1TB SSD, 2TB HDD, NVIDIA GTX 1050Max
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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 26 2015 10:56 AM

BillS:
I started reading NICOT's Isaiah 1-39 & Isaiah 40-66  as a technical commentary, but from almost the beginning of its nearly 1800 pages, I ended up in a devotional space. Even though the technical is there if I wanted it, the devotional attitude continued all the way through. By the end, my understanding of the OT's support for Jesus as Messiah was transformed.

Thanks for the recommendation, Bill.

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

Posts 5317
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 28 2015 1:55 PM

Through the Bible Day by Day: A Devotional Commentary (7 vols.) This is also a possibility that I did not think of till noticing it is shipping in a few days... I have not used it but it might offer a very arrofbable set on the entire Bible not as cheap as when in was in community pricing but still a decent savings.

-Dan

Posts 932
Justin Gatlin | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 2 2015 7:25 PM

BillS:

I started reading NICOT's Isaiah 1-39 & Isaiah 40-66  as a technical commentary, but from almost the beginning of its nearly 1800 pages, I ended up in a devotional space. Even though the technical is there if I wanted it, the devotional attitude continued all the way through. By the end, my understanding of the OT's support for Jesus as Messiah was transformed.

Blessings!

Wow. On Bill S's recommendation, I just started reading NICOT Isaiah. It is captivating.

 

The hearts of those oppressed by Assyria leapt up and revolts broke out anew. Sargon was dead; perhaps his successor would be a weakling. In Babylon the perennial war-horse, Merodach-baladan, once again emerged. It is unclear whether it was at this time or at some time prior to 710 that his envoys had visited Hezekiah (Isa. 39:1). At either time their purpose would have been the same: encouraging a fellow opponent of the Assyrian machine.
For whatever reason Hezekiah rose to the bait on this occasion. He became the moving force in a new coalition composed of Philistia, Judah, Edom, and Moab. The Philistines were evidently reluctant to join, so following the very same policy Israel and Syria had tried on Judah thirty years earlier, Hezekiah attacked them, deposed their king, and installed a man who would take his orders. Behind this policy one discerns the hand of Egypt, promising help and support. Isaiah was bitterly opposed to the entire proceeding: Egypt was worse than useless and Assyria could be left to God. The secret politicking and conniving were a bold-faced affront to God that could only bring disaster (cf. 22:5–14; 29:15–16; 30:1–18).

...

But Rowley does make an additional observation that is not without significance. Where North sees something of a straight-line progression from the collective to the individual in Isaiah’s total treatment of servanthood,23 Rowley sees a great fluidity in moving back and forth between the collective and the individual. This perspective seems to accord best with the data. The straight-line point of view would seem to suggest that the prophet slowly abandoned the idea that the people could ever become God’s servants and replaced this with the idea of an individual servant who would be what the people would not or could not be. But careful study of chs. 40–55 indicates that this is not the case. Instead of abandoning the idea of the people’s becoming true servants, he rather asks, and answers, the question of how they can become such servants. How can the broken, sinful Israel ever be the servants of God as he has promised? The answer is “the Servant.” Because he will be what they could not, and indeed will be that for all people, they can become what God has promised: his servants who can reveal his redeeming light.

John N. Oswalt, The Book of Isaiah, Chapters 1–39, The New International Commentary on the Old Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1986), 51–52.



Posts 790
James Hiddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 3 2015 9:07 AM

Dan Francis:

Rosie Perera:

I've only ever read two commentaries straight through, but I would recommend both of them:

Peterson, Eugene H. First and Second Samuel. Westminster Bible Companion. Westminster John Knox Press, 1999.

Waltke, Bruce K., and Cathi J. Fredricks. Genesis: A Commentary. Zondervan, 2001.

The entire Westminster Bible Companion Series series is fantastic although I have not read any fully yet. Years ago I read Pocket Bible Commentary by William Neil and NIV Compact Bible Commentary by John H. Sailhamer. Both were extremely enjoyable and very insightful, Neil's was actually originally published in 1961 as Harper's Bible Commentary. Over the years I have also read entire Biblical books out of the The Expositor’s Bible Commentary (EBC) (insightful but occasionally a bit dry in some areas) and the New Interpreter’s Bible (indeed one day I hope to read all 12 Volumes cover to cover, it by far my favourite series and offers great scholarship and deep theological reflections). 

-Dan

.

Thanks for the recommendations Dan Yes

Posts 1753
JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 3 2015 10:27 AM

I think the Zondervan Illustrated Bible Background Commentary would be a good one - I mean if i could afford to buy it here someday.

I have the printed NT copies.

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