To be able to lend resources

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This post has 15 Replies | 3 Followers

Posts 32
Juan M. Liao | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Mar 16 2015 6:43 PM

Hi,

I hope in the future it would be possible to lend resources to another logos user (as we can with physical books).  During the lend period the owner should not be able to use that resource (as with physical books).

The owner can "get back" his resources anytime. This would be better than physical books. We all have lost books we lend someone in the past.

Posts 264
Michael G. Halpern | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 16 2015 8:43 PM

YesYesYes

Posts 18756
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 16 2015 10:15 PM

Yes

Kwylx:
The owner can "get back" his resources anytime. This would be better than physical books. We all have lost books we lend someone in the past.

Yes, I like this benefit of in-app lending. You have a record of who you lent it to. Smile

Posts 1511
Forum MVP
Fr Devin Roza | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 17 2015 1:44 AM

Yes

Posts 1029
EastTN | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 17 2015 6:50 AM

Kwylx:

The owner can "get back" his resources anytime. This would be better than physical books. We all have lost books we lend someone in the past.

It would be particularly nice if you could lend a book for a specified period of time, and have it automatically returned at the end of the period. Then you could tell someone "I'll lend it to you for a month," and there wouldn't be any surprise or awkwardness when you took it back.

Posts 999
Mike Pettit | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 17 2015 11:05 AM

I do not think that it will happen, it is too easy to abuse in digital form as there are geographic limitations for lending physical books that do not apply to Ebooks. 

It would also be a nightmare to secure the necessary rights.

Posts 18756
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 17 2015 11:20 AM

Amazon lets people lend/borrow Kindle books for up to 14 days, and they've evidently solved the rights issue and the geographic freedom doesn't bother them. However they put various limitations on the use of this feature, e.g., you can only ever lend a particular book one time, and users can only borrow one book per month. They've also set up a Kindle Lending Library so that all Kindle users can make books available that they aren't needing anymore for other users to borrow. Again, I think the limitations above still hold.

Posts 55
Anne H | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 17 2015 11:57 AM

Great idea!

Posts 959
Yasmin Stephen | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 17 2015 3:32 PM

Rosie Perera:

Amazon lets people lend/borrow Kindle books for up to 14 days ...

Only as publishers allow; as far as I'm aware, none of the 'big 5' publishers (Penguin Random House, Macmillan, HarperCollins, Hachette and Simon & Schuster) allow Kindle lending on their books.  Also, and I don't track these things anymore so I'm not too sure of the present status but at the beginning of Kindle lending, only US accounts were allowed to initiate book loans because of the geographical restrictions on most of the books; non-US accounts were allowed to accept a book loan only if the book was available in their jurisdiction.

Last I knew Amazon had two ways of lending books.  There's the Kindle lending feature (screenshot); the book can be loaned only once and for 14 days. While it's on loan, you have no access to it.  These loans are done between Amazon customers:

And then there's the Kindle Owners Lending Library, which is only available to Prime members (more details). You get to borrow one book a month and keep it as long as you want but can't borrow another till you 'return' the previous book.  This type of lending is not between customers but rather from a list Amazon has made available to Prime customers.

Rosie Perera:

They've also set up a Kindle Lending Library so that all Kindle users can make books available that they aren't needing anymore for other users to borrow.

I'm not aware of this (but, like I said above, I haven't been tracking); I know there are sites (like Lendle) that facilitate lending of Kindle books (i.e. they bring lenders and borrowers together) but I have never known Amazon to do this themselves (or to even condone it).

Posts 18756
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 17 2015 4:51 PM

Yasmin Stephen:

And then there's the Kindle Owners Lending Library, which is only available to Prime members (more details). You get to borrow one book a month and keep it as long as you want but can't borrow another till you 'return' the previous book.  This type of lending is not between customers but rather from a list Amazon has made available to Prime customers.

Rosie Perera:

They've also set up a Kindle Lending Library so that all Kindle users can make books available that they aren't needing anymore for other users to borrow.

I'm not aware of this...

I was wrong about the name of it, it's the Kindle Owners' Lending Library that you described above. And I might have been wrong about what resources were available for lending on it. You're probably more knowledgeable than I am. I only took a quick look at a web page that mentioned it but didn't read it carefully.

EDIT: I think I just assumed that because it was called the Kindle Owners' Lending Library it was a library made up of books owned by Kindle owners who had made them available for lending, and I made the further assumption that when someone borrowed from it, that meant it was no longer available to the person who owned it. So never mind my faulty assumptions. Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.

Posts 959
Yasmin Stephen | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 17 2015 5:28 PM

Rosie Perera:

Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.

This made me smile because there's no way I'd be able to ignore a man behind the curtain Smile

Posts 1029
EastTN | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 17 2015 5:44 PM

Mike Pettit:

It would also be a nightmare to secure the necessary rights.

Perhaps Faithlife could start by doing with their Lexham Press titles.  If it proved successful with those, it might then be easier to obtain the necessary rights from other publishers.

Posts 18756
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 17 2015 7:10 PM

Yasmin Stephen:

Rosie Perera:

Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.

This made me smile because there's no way I'd be able to ignore a man behind the curtain Smile

It's my favorite quote from the Wizard of Oz. Of course in that scene there is no way Dorothy and her friends could ignore the wizard, the man behind the curtain. Telling someone to pay no attention to something is very likely to increase their interest in it. (The classic "don't think about polar bears.") Needless to say I was joking, so I'm glad it made you smile. Smile

Posts 506
Tim Taylor | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 18 2015 7:40 AM

Yes

Posts 14
Joel Dougherty | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Dec 16 2016 9:48 AM

Excellent idea Yes

Posts 1029
EastTN | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Dec 16 2016 9:55 AM

Perhaps a more limited approach that FaithLife could experiment with would be to allow a congregation to create a lending library for its members.  It might actually result in more sales.  Lay members might be more likely to buy a modest base package if they knew they could check more specialized resources out from the church's digital library as needed. 

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