Aquinas' Catena Aurea

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Ryan Lenerz | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 1 2010 10:23 AM

Now that this item has shipped, I am pleased to say it is even better than I thought it would be.  Additionally, it is linked to the Ante-Nicene Fathers books, so while it takes excerpts of homilies for each phrase within a verse, with a single click, you can see that excerpt in it's entirety.  Fantastic resource!

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Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 1 2010 10:43 AM

Ryan Lenerz:

Now that this item has shipped, I am pleased to say it is even better than I thought it would be.  Additionally, it is linked to the Ante-Nicene Fathers books, so while it takes excerpts of homilies for each phrase within a verse, with a single click, you can see that excerpt in it's entirety.  Fantastic resource!

YesYes  can't tell you how happy I am with this resource!  It was a terrific steal as a community pricing product, but it is one of my most looked-forward to products across the board.  The tie-ins with the A-N fathers is absolutely how Logos is supposed to be!  Wicked!  (said in the modern vernacular meaning . . . .)

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

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Fred Chapman | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 1 2010 11:11 AM

agreedYes

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Bill Shewmaker | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 1 2010 11:49 AM

YesYesYesYesYesYes

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Bohuslav Wojnar | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 1 2010 11:55 AM

Great, great, great. That's how we should get all the big Public Domain titles to Logos. Yes

Bohuslav

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Mark | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 1 2010 1:20 PM

I, too, am pretty impressed with this resource.

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Alan Macgregor | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 1 2010 2:59 PM

Dan DeVilder:
The tie-ins with the A-N fathers is absolutely how Logos is supposed to be!

Dan, I couldn't agree more. I ran it yesterday for the first time and I just loved the links into the A-N Fathers. It will be even better when Bede's Works are published at the end of this month! Big Smile

Every blessing

Alan

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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 1 2010 5:58 PM

This is one of the biggest success stories in the Logus user community pulling together to help see a CP product get the number of orders it needed to get into production, and I'm so impressed with Logos for how quickly they got it out. The links to ANF and NPNF are a big plus. Well done, Logos! This is easily going to become one of my most used resources.

Also, a big thank you to MJ Smith (Martha) for letting us know of the importance of this resource back so many months ago. I'd never even heard of it before. But once I learned what it was I jumped on the bandwagon with enthusiasm and wrote the Logos blog post that I think ultimately pushed this over the top.

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John Graves | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 1 2010 6:05 PM

Never been happier with a resource as far as price and quality of taggin etc.  Unbeatable!

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 1 2010 11:51 PM

How do I interpret the series of comments on a single passage? eg. Matt 25:14:30

ORIGEN. Whenever you see of those who have received from Christ...

GREGORY. (ubi sup.) Otherwise; The five talents denote ... ==> does Otherwise indicate he is commenting on Origen's remarks?

GLOSS. (ord.) And straightway took his journey, not changing his place, but leaving them to their own freewill and choice of action.

JEROME. He that had received five talents, ...

GREGORY. (ubi sup.) There are also some who though they cannot pierce to things inward and mystical ==>  is also related to his previous comment?

ORIGEN. Or, They that have their senses exercised by ==>  to what is or related?

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 1 2010 11:59 PM

Matt 25:31-45

CHRYSOSTOM. Observe that He says not ‘Receive,’ but possess, or inherit, as duo to you from of old.

Luke12:41-46

CYRIL OF ALEXANDRIA. Thus the faithful and wise servant prudently giving out in due season the servants’ food, that is, their spiritual meat, will be blessed according to the Saviour’s word, in that he will obtain still greater things, and will be thought worthy of the rewards which are duo to friends.

Is duo a typo for due?

 

Dave
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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 2 2010 2:15 AM

Dave Hooton:

How do I interpret the series of comments on a single passage? eg. Matt 25:14:30

ORIGEN. Whenever you see of those who have received from Christ...

GREGORY. (ubi sup.) Otherwise; The five talents denote ... ==> does Otherwise indicate he is commenting on Origen's remarks?

No. He's commenting on the Matthew passage. These excerpts from the Church Fathers were pulled out of their original context and arranged in this order by Aquinas. You'd need to look at the context from which that quote came to see what the "Otherwise" is referring to. For many of the works quoted in Catena Aurea, Logos has provided links to the fuller context, but for these words by Gregory ("ubi sup." is short for "ubi supra" which means "where (mentioned or cited) above" -- thanks to Collins Latin Dictionary and Grammar in Logos! -- which refers to his Hom. in Ev. ix, l.) we don't have that. But a little sleuthing can find it: "Hom. in Ev." is an abbreivation of one of Gregory's works. A search in Logos for it along with abbreviations found it listed in the Hermeneia volume on Matthew 8-20. Its full title is Homiliarum in evangelia. My Latin is almost non-existent, but I bet that means Homilies on the Gospels. I've found the Latin text of that work online and it is clearly a bunch of homilies, numbered. So this reference Hom. in Ev. ix, l.  is referring to Homilia IX (Homily 9) which can be found in this PDF on p. 39. It is titled "LECTIO S. EVANG. SEC. MATTH. XXV, 14-30." (Reading from the holy gospel according to Matthew 25:14-30). The second Roman numeral there is actually a lower case L which would mean paragraph 50, but there are only 6 paragraphs in this homily, so it is probably a typo. Probably supposed to be a 1. Indeed in the first paragraph, with my limited Latin and the dictionary, I can find the original text that is translated into English in that comment you quoted. It is "Quinque ergo talentis donum quinque sensuum, id est exteriorum scientia, exprimitur. Duobus vero intellectus et operatio designatur. Unius autem talenti nomine intellectus tantummodo designatur." There's no "otherwise" in there. There's an "ergo" which means "therefore" (according to Collins). So I got curious and started searching for other similar uses of Otherwise, and lo and behold, it's all over the place, either "Otherwise;" or "Or otherwise;" before a comment. Thomas Aquinas the editor must have meant something by inserting it. But I cannot discover what.

Furthermore, some more Google searching led me to the English translation of Homiliarum in evangelia. It is called Forty Gospel Homilies, published by Cistercian Publications, #123 in their Cistercian Studies Series, which by the way would be an awesome series to have in Logos. EDIT: Here is an introduction to Forty Gospel Homilies.

Dave Hooton:

GLOSS. (ord.) And straightway took his journey, not changing his place, but leaving them to their own freewill and choice of action.

JEROME. He that had received five talents, ...

GREGORY. (ubi sup.) There are also some who though they cannot pierce to things inward and mystical ==>  is also related to his previous comment?

Not necessarily. Only if these two excerpts came back to back from the original text. I'm not going to attempt my Latin translation exercise again to find out where this text comes in the original Latin.

Dave Hooton:

ORIGEN. Or, They that have their senses exercised by ==>  to what is or related?

Possibly the previous context in Origen's work, though as with "Otherwise" Aquinas seems to use this at the beginning of his excerpts quite often. Aquinas did not tell us from what work of Origen's this excerpt comes. Probably his commentary on Matthew. From the Preface of Catena Aurea: "The Catena begins to quote Origen’s Commentary on S. Matt. at chap. 16 though our fragment of it begins as early as chap. 13 It uses the Old Interpretation, which Huet conjectures to have been the work of Bellator, or of some contemporary of Cassiodorus. This version will be found in the Ben. Ed. of Origen, and is according to Huet barbarous and full of errors."

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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 2 2010 2:23 AM

Dave Hooton:

Matt 25:31-45

CHRYSOSTOM. Observe that He says not ‘Receive,’ but possess, or inherit, as duo to you from of old.

Luke12:41-46

CYRIL OF ALEXANDRIA. Thus the faithful and wise servant prudently giving out in due season the servants’ food, that is, their spiritual meat, will be blessed according to the Saviour’s word, in that he will obtain still greater things, and will be thought worthy of the rewards which are duo to friends.

Is duo a typo for due?

Yes. Google search for some unique phrase from each of those texts with due substituted for duo and you'll find them in Catena Aurea on Google Books:

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David Ames | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 2 2010 5:45 AM

Dave Hooton:

Is duo a typo for due?

dat. dusí occurs in Matt. 6:24; 22:40. With the nom. noun (Matt. 9:27; 20:21; Luke 7:41; John 1:37). With the gen. noun (Matt. 18:16; 20:24; Luke 12:6; John 1:40). With the acc. noun (Matt. 4:18; Luke 3:11). The phrase “two or three” (Matt. 18:20; 1 Cor. 14:29) means some, a few. The phrases aná dúo (aná [303]) and katá dúo (katá [2596], a distributive prep.) mean by two and two (Luke 9:3; 10:1; 1 Cor. 14:27); eis dúo (eis [1519], into), means in two parts (Matt. 27:51; Mark 15:38); dúo dúo means two and two (Mark 6:7; Sept.: Gen. 6:20).

Deriv.: dekadúo (1177) and dṓdeka (1427), twelve.

 The Complete Word Study Dictionary : New Testament,

 

 1417.  δύο duō, doo´-ŏ; a prim. numeral; “two”:—both, twain, two.

vol. 1, A Concise Dictionary of the Words in the Greek Testament and The Hebrew Bible, 24

 

 dual

adjective

1       consisting of two parts, elements, or aspects.

Grammar denoting an inflection that refers to exactly two people or things.

2       (often dual to) Mathematics related to another theorem or expression by the interchange of terms, such as ‘point’ and ‘line’.

noun

1       Grammar a dual inflection.

2       Mathematics a theorem or expression that is dual to another.

verb (duals, dualling, dualled) Brit. convert (a road) into a dual carriageway.

derivatives duality noun (plural dualities). dualize (or dualise) verb dually adverb

origin Middle English: from Latin dualis, from duo ‘two’.

Concise Oxford English Dictionary, 11th ed

 

[We can not let Rosie Perera have all the fun]

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David Ames | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 2 2010 5:51 AM

Skiped a line

1417. δύο dúo; indeclinable, used for all genders, cardinal number. Two. The irregular and later dat. dusí occurs in Matt. 6:24; 22:40. With the nom. noun (Matt. 9:27; 20:21; Luke 7:41; John 1:37). With the gen. noun (Matt. 18:16; 20:24; Luke 12:6; John 1:40). With the acc. noun (Matt.

[all I did was search for duo]


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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 2 2010 5:53 AM

Rosie Perera:
So I got curious and started searching for other similar uses of Otherwise, and lo and behold, it's all over the place, either "Otherwise;" or "Or otherwise;" before a comment. Thomas Aquinas the editor must have meant something by inserting it. But I cannot discover what.

The number of introductory "Otherwise" and "Or" was immediately obvious but it makes sense that these are inserted by editor Aquinas. He seems to be relating the quotes from the different authors ie. a different perspective on the five talents by Origen and Hilary. The also seems to be Origen following his previous comment on the five talents, artificially separated by the editor inserting comments from other authors.

 

Aquinas also appears to have paraphrased some of the original authors eg.

Matt 1:2

CHRYSOSTOM. (Hom. iii.) Matthew then, desiring to preserve in memory the lineage of the Lord’s humanity through the succession of His parents, begins with Abraham, saying, Abraham begat Isaac. Why does he not mention lsmael, his first-born? And again, Isaac begat Jacob; why does he not speak of Esau his first-born? Because through them he could not have come down to David.

The nearest I can relate that to Hom. iii from NPNF 1:10 is:-

2. But why is it, that having mentioned Abraham, and having said that “he begat Isaac, and Isaac, Jacob;” and not having made any mention of his brother; when he is come to Jacob, he remembers both “Judah, and his brethren”? Now there are some that say, it was because of the perverseness of Esau, and of the rest that came before. But I should not say this; for if it were so, how is it that he a little after mentions such women? It being out of contraries, in this place, that His glory is manifested; not by having great forefathers, but low and of little account. For to the lofty One it is a great glory to be able to abase Himself exceedingly. Wherefore then did He not mention them? Because Saracens, and Ishmaelites, and Arabians, and as many as are sprung from those ancestors, have nothing in common with the race of the Israelites. For this cause then he passes over those in silence, and hastens on to His forefathers, and those of the Jewish people. Wherefore he saith, “And Jacob begat Judas and his brethren.” For at this point the race of the Jews begins to have its peculiar mark.

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 2 2010 5:59 AM

Rosie Perera:
Yes. Google search for some unique phrase from each of those texts with due substituted for duo and you'll find them in Catena Aurea on Google Books:

Thanks, Rosie.

Dave
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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 2 2010 6:01 AM

David Ames:
[all I did was search for duo]

Did you use your Intel Core 2 Duo?

Dave
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David Ames | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 2 2010 9:26 AM

Did you use your Intel Core 2 Duo?

Yes, an I-3 duo core and duo thread for each core

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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 2 2010 1:34 PM

Dave Hooton:

David Ames:
[all I did was search for duo]

Did you use your Intel Core 2 Duo?

Due is also "two" in Italian (uno, due, tre, ...)

A duo is a musical piece played or sung by two musicians. The plural of that is dui. Even though it's from the Italian, and we'd normally say "duos" in English, dui is a valid Scrabble word and comes in handy from time to time. Smile

A DUI is also a driving infraction. AutomobileBeer Smile

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