Lowering the Price

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Kolen Cheung | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Feb 9 2010 5:33 PM

I find one thing ironic:

e.g.

Introducing the New Testament: A Historical, Literary, and Theological Survey

it cost 44.99 USD. I think it is set by the publisher.

But then at Amazon.com, Introducing the New Testament: A Historical, Literary, and Theological Survey costs $29.69.

I found the same problem for all the titles that is having the same price as the printed version. So, in fact we are purchasing e-books that is even more expansive than a printed one, which shouldn't be. The only pros is we can search it, and linked to other resources. But it still doesn't make sense.

Could the Logos ask the publisher to put the electronic price at the minimum that any retailers can sell in printed version?

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 9 2010 10:03 PM

This is one of the Baker titles, the pre-pub prices of which are being discussed here:

http://community.logos.com/forums/t/11152.aspx

You are right that the prices are usually set by the publisher (not Logos), and typically reflect the MSRP, rather than the lowest price one can get from a high-volume discount house, like Amazon.

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

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Jack Caviness | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2010 2:59 PM

Kolen Cheung:
I found the same problem for all the titles that is having the same price as the printed version. So, in fact we are purchasing e-books that is even more expansive than a printed one, which shouldn't be.

On page 4 of the link in Richard's post is a message from Bob Pritchett, CEO of Logos, explaining this situation. You should read it. Two facts from his post: 1) Digital books are not cheaper to produce than paper books. 2) Amazon often prices books below cost in an effort to drive the competition—including traditional publishers—out of business.

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Edwin Bowden | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2010 3:07 PM

Jack Caviness:

On page 4 of the link in Richard's post is a message from Bob Pritchett, CEO of Logos, explaining this situation. You should read it. Two facts from his post: 1) Digital books are not cheaper to produce than paper books. 2) Amazon often prices books below cost in an effort to drive the competition—including traditional publishers—out of business.

That took me back to memories of a sales conference years ago.

I was a sales rep for Bible publishers for over 12 years. I remember one sales conference where a competitor was beating our price on a key Bible style. One rep asked the sales manager why we couldn't sell our Bible for the same price.

The sales manager answered "That company lost X million dollars the previous year.

The sales rep asked "What price could we sell our Bible for if we lost X mllion dollars?" Wink

Posts 1055
Kolen Cheung | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2010 3:32 PM

After seeing the post, I think I should buy more things from Amazon.

Well, I even get some money from Amazon if I purchase from him!

Electronic might be good, that allows you to search and synthesize the libraries.

But, the for some of the Baker Books that Logos is selling are Baker Academics. Textbook is still better in printing format. And easier to sell it again after reading it.

One of the main disadvantages of electronic copy is that it is very difficult to sell it out.

So, personally, Logos is only good for Commentaries, encyclopedia, dictionaries, etc. that is intrinsically working better in electronic format (greatly reduce the space occupied, portability, searching time).

i.e. good for the books that is intended to search but not reading through, but bad for the books that is intended to be read throughout the whole book.

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