Have you been to Israel? What do you recommend I download to my tablet?

Page 1 of 1 (18 items)
This post has 17 Replies | 5 Followers

Posts 795
Tim Hensler | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Jan 21 2016 3:31 AM

I am going with a tour group to Israel (first time) later this year and am taking my Android tablet.  I'd like to know which Logos resources (by type or title) you would recommend I download onto my tablet to have with me during the tour and what would be handy to reference while listening to the tour guides and Bible teachers while we are at various locations in Israel.

Recommendations for non-Logos Android apps that work offline would also be appreciated.

Thank you for your recommendations.

Posts 28124
Forum MVP
JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 21 2016 3:47 AM

Which resources? None. Look up and enjoy the scenery. 

OSX & iOS | Logs |  Install

Posts 9157
Forum MVP
Bruce Dunning | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 21 2016 5:59 AM

I've had the privilege of going to Israel twice, once in 1977 and once in 1999 but both of these times were before I owned a tablet. Perhaps this is obvious but, If I were to do it again, in addition to Bibles and books I was currently reading,  I would be sure to include maps and some resources on archaeology, geography and history so that I could reference them as I traveled.

I hope you have a great trip Tim. Let us know how it goes and what resources you ended up taking and which ones you wish you had taken.

Using adventure and community to challenge young people to continually say "yes" to God

Posts 275
Greg F | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 21 2016 6:10 AM

I have never been to Israel, but I am looking forward to any responses this thread might turn up for my first trip!

As an anecdote, however, I was recently wandering through the Near Eastern Antiquities section of the Louvre in Paris, when I stumbled upon the giant (and beautiful) Frieze of the Archers. Having recently read Xenophon's Anabasis and currently reading Herodotus' Histories, I found them particularly interesting, and I was very glad to have brought along my little tablet filled with a number of Logos resources. I was able to read about Darius I and Xerxes, the Babylonians, the Assyrians, etc. in a number of bible dictionaries and encyclopedias, all while standing there with the originals in front of me.

It helped me remember why I spent so much money on my Logos library. :)

Posts 22370
Forum MVP
Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 21 2016 7:18 AM

Tim Hensler:
I am going with a tour group to Israel (first time) later this year and am taking my Android tablet.  I'd like to know which Logos resources (by type or title) you would recommend I download onto my tablet to have with me during the tour and what would be handy to reference while listening to the tour guides and Bible teachers while we are at various locations in Israel.

When reflecting on this question while in Israel some time ago I wrote:

"Personally i have found having access to Bibles. Commentaries, Atlases and Dictionaries has been most helpful."

And I would still stay the same - there were things I wanted to lookup / check in Bibles and Commentaries.

Having a range of atlases downloaded was very useful - to understand something of the places we were visiting and where they were in context.

And a range of Dictionaries allowing me to check different facts were also helpful.

Posts 297
Bruce Roth | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 21 2016 7:38 AM

We were in Israel in 2014 with a group.  I took along my ipad and found it useful on the tour bus to take notes.  I am not sure what exists for Android tablets, but I used an app, Notability, that allowed me to use handwriting as well as audio recording and take photos.  Our tour guide would speak on the bus and I could take notes as well as record his talk (recording was weak, but could be listened to later). As you wrote while recording the app was smart enough to remember those positions, so later I could tap a part of the note and the audio would play from that point. I could also take a photo if I wanted and add it to the note. 

I also had the Logos app but didn't have much opportunity to reference it.  You might find that you are on the move a lot and going from site to site without much time to reflect or reference Bibles or books. 

It was helpful for me to read up ahead of time about Israel, the various places we visited and get some background.  I would suggest getting the list of places together and maybe make a clipping files that you could organize by place with background material clipped. 

Like some suggest you might just want to set back and take it in.  It goes quickly and there is the sense of information and experiential overload. 

I have a new book on Logos that I didn't have prior to our trip, Churches and Monasteries in the Holy Land, As a lot of what you visit as places are built around churches you see a lot of sites in this book.  Color photos as well as background about the site.  

Here is an excerpt of the text for The Church of the Beatitudes.  It has four photos.:


When He saw the crowds, He went up on the mountain, and after He sat down, His disciples came to Him. Then He began to teach them, saying: “The poor in spirit are blessed, for the kingdom of heaven is theirs.”
Matthew 5:1–3

Jesus delivered the famous Sermon on the Mount to His disciples and a large crowd at a spot the precise location of which is not known. The tradition which most Christians accept connects the sermon to the mountain above Capernaum and Tabgha, near the Sea of Galilee.

The Beatitudes are the eight blessings that open the sermon. The discourse extends over three consecutive chapters in the Gospel of Matthew, as a single coherent treatise. In it, Jesus explained that he had not come to invalidate the Torah, the Jewish scripture, or the words of the Jewish prophets. He focused on ethics, charity, prayer that comes from the heart, love and the importance of the Ten Commandments. The Sermon on the Mount, a foundation stone of Christian belief, also includes one of the two versions of the Lord’s Prayer (Pater Noster) that appear in the New Testament.

The remains of a Byzantine church that was dedicated to the Sermon on the Mount can still be seen today near Tabgha. The church was built at the end of the fourth century, but was destroyed three centuries later. Its modern successor was constructed at a much higher point on the mountain that is commonly known as Mount of Beatitudes.

The Church of the Beatitudes and the hostel that was built next to it are maintained by Italian nuns from the Franciscan Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, also known as the Sisters of Egypt. Antonio Barluzzi, the Italian architect, designed the church on the eve of World War II. Barluzzi’s homeland was in the grip of the fascist government of Benito Mussolini, who provided financial support for the construction. Thus, paradoxically, a fascist regime was partly responsible for a religious facility that symbolizes conciliation and friendship.

The Church of the Beatitudes is a centric structure, an architectural form that is frequently selected to commemorate constitutive events. Here, the event is the sermon of Jesus and its great significance for Christianity. The church was planned as an octagon that surrounds a square. The eight sides represent the eight blessings (Beatitudes). The altar is located on a low platform in the center of the church, under the large dome. Nearby is an arch that extends over a cross adorned with depictions of the life of Christ, the Crucifixion and the Resurrection. The church’s walls are faced with high-quality marble and the precise, modern oblong windows in them offer a view of the outside world. The church’s mosaic floor features motifs inspired by the Sea of Galilee as well as a depiction of the Seven Holy Virtues.

The church is decorated with relative simplicity. It is not located above the remains of an older church, which would have given it an added layer of importance. Nevertheless, due to its great symbolic significance, two of the popes who have visited the Holy Land in the last few decades, Paul VI in 1964 and John Paul II in 2000, made sure to include it on the itinerary of their pilgrimage to holy sites around the Sea of Galilee.

Rapp, D., & Isachar, H. (2015). Churches and Monasteries in the Holy Land. (J. Weiner & E. Rapp, Eds., H. J. Gleit, Trans.) (pp. 80–85). Herzliya: Apogee Press.

Posts 2764
Erwin Stull, Sr. | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 21 2016 8:41 AM

Hi Tim;

I've never been to Israel (would love to go one day), but this is what I would probably do:

  • Travel lite. You probably wouldn't want a lot of luggage and hardcopy material to carry around.
  • Download in Logos or ebook format, any material on the region (Maps, introductions, etc.) and of course your preferred Bible and commentary.
  • Prior to travel, study or review everything you can on the area. In this case, Israel. You may even want to check out the Mobile Ed course on Biblical Archaeology.
  • During the tour, leave the heavy reading and study for time in the hotel. Take you camera and enjoy the tour. If you are preoccupied with reading/study, you won't enjoy the tour.
  • On the way back home, reflect on everything you learned and enjoyed. This will be the time that you won't have anything to do but to take the ride home.

Posts 13386
Forum MVP
Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 21 2016 9:07 AM

Tim Hensler:
I am going with a tour group to Israel (first time) later this year and am taking my Android tablet.  I'd like to know which Logos resources (by type or title) you would recommend I download onto my tablet to have with me during the tour and what would be handy to reference while listening to the tour guides and Bible teachers while we are at various locations in Israel.

I was very fortunate in that my cell company offered free data roaming in Israel, so I had access to my entire Logos library. But what I referred to most often was my best Bible Dictionaries (for me that was New Bible Dictionary and Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary). They're great for looking up information about what happened at different places (if you know the Biblical name, as opposed to the contemporary name). I used NBD for the big biblical places, and AYBD for the non-Biblical or more obscure places (e.g. Masada). I found there was too much detail in AYBD for places like Nazareth, for example.

It's worth making sure you've got Josephus downloaded, too.

It's still in prepub, but the DayOne travel guide to Israel is excellent: https://www.logos.com/product/54350/day-one-travel-guides-global-destinations. It's worth buying in print, as it can fit in your pocket.

Honestly, if you've got a good tour guide, that's about all you'll need.

Tim Hensler:
Recommendations for non-Logos Android apps that work offline would also be appreciated.

If you'll get time away from your tour guide in the Old City of Jerusalem, I'd very strongly recommend these audio tours. They're free and very high quality, and you can download everything before you leave: http://www.itraveljerusalem.com/tour-categories/audio-tours-en/.

Posts 5572
Forum MVP
Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 21 2016 9:10 AM

Tim Hensler:

I am going with a tour group to Israel (first time) later this year and am taking my Android tablet.  I'd like to know which Logos resources (by type or title) you would recommend I download onto my tablet to have with me during the tour and what would be handy to reference while listening to the tour guides and Bible teachers while we are at various locations in Israel.

Recommendations for non-Logos Android apps that work offline would also be appreciated.

Thank you for your recommendations.

Bible, Resources with Maps (layered, or different maps of different eras), Bible Encyclopedia (to look up further background info in prep for the day, or reflecting on the day). For a quick reference one or two of the better study Bibles might be helpful. A Bible background commentary might also prove interesting.

Download what you want to your device before leaving the US. There are places to connect to the internet there, but not everywhere, and it's not always as reliable or fast as here in the US.

During the day, as you're touring, leave your device off (for the most part anyway) and just take in what you're seeing. Take lots of pictures, but don't try to experience Israel solely through the lens, if you know what I mean. I would not recommend opening a resource "while listening to the tour guides..." - seems like bad manners, plus you might miss something significant.

I was in Israel in 2012. Unforgettable (I can no longer read Biblical narrative without a map handy). Enjoy your experience of those places where Jesus, and so many other heroes of the faith, walked and lived! 

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

Posts 586
Randall Cue | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 21 2016 9:34 AM

We were in Israel in 2009. In fact, my avatar is the seat of Moses that was in the synagogue in Chorazin. Our tour was led by our friend, Dr. Gary Burge. The tour leader can make a huge difference in your experience. Because of Gary, we had access to places that most tours don't get to. For instance, we were at a working archeological dig in what was thought to be Bethsaida. There we saw the oldest known gate in Israel at Geshur, the city of Absalom's grandfather. As others have said, take a few pictures and take in with your own senses the experience of being wherever you are. I'd would endorse Mark Barnes' suggestions as to resources to look at. As was told me, once you have visited Israel, you will read the Bible in color. God bless you on your trip.

Soli Deo Gloria

Randy

Posts 205
David J. Wilson | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 21 2016 9:50 AM

Hi Tim:

I visited the Holy Land in May 2015 and had similar questions before I left.
Very much depends on the nature of the group you are travelling with and the background of the tour guide.
If you are travelling with a church group and have a Christian tour guide you can expect to get into some depth re study of the specific Bible passages associated with the sites you visit hence you will want copies of your preferred Bibles and get lots of practice in quickly looking up relevant passages.
You will want to review your preferred commentaries on these passages the night BEFORE you visit a site and you may want to review these again shortly after your visit. Definitely endorse the recommendation re https://www.logos.com/product/54240/churches-and-monasteries-in-the-holy-land 

Couple of other suggestions: suggest you download and review beforehand the Tour Guides and maps you can get in pdf format from 
https://vicbethlehem.wordpress.com/2012/02/28/online-guides-to-palestine/ (Visitor Information Centre, Bethlehem)
These may be especially useful if you have free time at any of those locations (or if you get unintentionally separated from your tour group.)

Remember that while Christianity is a minority religion over there, the majority of the local Christians are Palestinian. 
Most of the key Christian sites are in Palestinian areas (Bethlehem, Old City of Jerusalem etc).
Referring to all sites being in Israel can cause some friction locally.

The more languages you can read the better will be your ability to get local information from signs. While you can get by in English only, several of the sites are run by French, German, Greek, Russian and Italian organizations, not all provide English translations. (Example: Pater Noster where the Lord's Prayer is displayed in multiple languages is run by the French, so the English version of the Lord's prayer is labelled Anglais.  The gift shop default to French and you get better prices paying in Euros than in US dollars. Needless to say in Palestinian gift shops, prices are generally negotiable if you can afford to spend a little time and have some (local) tea.

Just two other things: most hotels and most tour buses have wireless internet access so if you forget to download something before you go you can do it there. Have a means to download photos and videos from your tablet to some other storage device so you can free up space for more photos (more than one SD card if your tablet uses one for photos, and know how to mount and dismount them), or upload to cloud storage when back at the hotel (as a backup even if you still have plenty of storage on the device).

If there is an option, stay over a few extra days in Jerusalem to visit or revisit places you missed or did not get enough time in on the regular part of the tour.  A couple of very interesting places included in almost none of the tours are The Church of St. James (Armenian cathedral) which you can visit during a daily 2 pm choral service http://www.seetheholyland.net/church-of-st-james/ (recommended to get a fuller picture of Christianity in the Holy Land), and the Church of St. Mark (Syrian Orthodox) http://www.seetheholyland.net/st-marks-church/ which is reputed to be the site of the oldest church (anywhere).  If the opportunity arises, a visit to the Tomb of the Patriarchs in Hebron will help fill in some Old Testament background (can be visited in a half day trip from Jerusalem) http://www.seetheholyland.net/tombs-of-the-patriarchs/   All these are rarely visited in regular tours because of the difficulty in accommodating large groups on tight schedules.

Posts 1415
Ben | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 21 2016 10:18 AM

In spite of my prep, I used my ipad very little in Israel (3 weeks, 2013, my second trip after a 6-month study abroad there as an undergrad.) 

Some of the best prep readings came out of Bible Review and Biblical Archaeology Review; their logos status is now, uh, indefinite. 

Otherwise, I'd echo the more extensive Bible Dictionaries, like ABD. 

"The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of Conservatives is to prevent mistakes from being corrected."- G.K. Chesterton

Posts 265
Greg Corbin | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 22 2016 7:41 PM

Tim,

   I went to Israel in 2011, and I want to lead a group back in the future. Here are my recommendations for you to get the most out of your trip...

1)  As for the apps, I would recommend a couple of good study Bibles and a couple of good Bible dictionaries - Baker, ISBE, Holman. If you have an atlas in Logos that would be great as well.

2)  With it being your first time, you will be overwhelmed trying to take it all in and getting pictures.  Take pictures of the explanatory placards at each stop so that you can go back and read them again later, keeping everything straight. Doing this is also great for remembering "what that was." Make pictures of street signs, etc. Anything that jogs your memory and helps you keep things straight. Trust me, you will be so busy taking everything in, you likely won't take as many notes as you think. Your pictures will be 90% of your notes.

3)  I agree with the suggestion to compile notes/clippings documents for the major sites you will visit. This is easily done as you will have your schedule in advance and reviewing them the day you visit a site will be invaluable.

4)  It would also be very helpful to study the overall history of Israel and the history behind key sites in addition to their significance in the Bible. For instance, it is powerful to study the Bible, be familiar with the history of the temple(s), and then visit the Western Wall.  It is another thing to know a little bit about what happened there from 70 AD until the present day.

5)  Brush up on your church history as well. In addition to Catholics, the Orthodox church is heavily represented in Israel as well - especially at key sites such as the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and the Church of the Nativity.

6)   A study of modern day Judaism and Islam is a must.  Pay particular attention to dress and the religious significance of certain articles of clothing and accessories.

Posts 4
Joe Griffin | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 23 2016 3:07 AM

Male sure you save those to your tablet so they will be available even when an internet is not

available.

Posts 4
Joe Griffin | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 23 2016 3:20 AM

Most tour guides now days will supply you will a wireless earpiece so you can listen to his narrations ; so most likely will not do much listening to other sources. Most tour buses also have internet provided but it is spotty at best and you have to log in quite often.

Posts 612
John Brumett | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 23 2016 9:38 AM

I highly recommend Charles Dyer's book The New Christian travelers guide to the holy land.   

https://vyrso.com/product/24454/the-new-christian-travelers-guide-to-the-holy-land 

See also ARNOLD G. FRUCHTENBAUM A Study Guide of Israel which list places and Bible Events of the Land of Israel.  https://www.logos.com/product/3909/a-study-guide-of-israel-historical-and-geographical 

Posts 165
Wayne | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2016 9:11 PM

Based on the above post we did pick up Fruchtenbaum's book. My wife is teaching Bible Geography at the moment. I have enclosed a random quote from the book. I think that it would be helpful on a trip as it gives a quick summary of the principal facts and where the place is mentioned in Scripture.



    MOUNT HERMON (JEBEL ESH-SHEIKH)

      1.      × miles culminating in three peaks

         a.      Each 1/4 mile from the other

         b.      Its highest peak is 9,230 feet above sea level

         c.      Highest mountain in Israel with the Israeli side (Mitzpe Shelagim) measuring 7,200 feet above sea level

         d.      Highest mountain in all of the Promised Land

      2.      Other names

         a.      Sirion—Deuteronomy 3:8; Psalm 29:6

         b.      Senir—Deuteronomy 3:9; Ezekiel 27:5

         c.      Sion—Deuteronomy 4:48

         d.      Baal-Hermon—Judges 3:3; 1 Chronicles 5:23

         e.      Baal-Gad—Joshua 11:17; 12:7; 13:5

         f.      Aramaic Talmudic name: Tur Talga, Snow Mountain

         g.      Arabic names

           (1)      Jabel A-Talg, Snow Mountain

           (2)      Jabel A-Sheikh, Old Man Mountain

      3.      Marked the northern boundary of Bashan—Deuteronomy 3:8–9; 4:48; Joshua 12:1; 13:5, 11

      4.      Conquered under Moses—Deuteronomy 3:8

      5.      Part of the northern confederacy against Joshua—Joshua 11:3

      6.      Joshua controlled it—Joshua 11:17; 12:1, 5

      7.      Marked the northern boundary of the Transjordanian Tribes—Joshua 12:1–13:11

      8.      Given to the Tribe of Manasseh—Deuteronomy 3:13; 1 Chronicles 5:23

      9.      The land beyond Mount Hermon was considered part of the Land that remained to be taken—Judges 3:3

      10.      Noted for its majesty—Psalm 42:6; 89:12; Song of Solomon 4:8

      11.      Noted for its dew—Psalm 133:3

      12.      Most likely the Mount of Transfiguration—Matthew 17:1, 9; Mark 9:2, 9; Luke 9:28, 37


Fruchtenbaum, A., 1994. A Study Guide of Israel: Historical and Geographical, Tustin, CA: Ariel Ministries.

Posts 1415
Ben | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2016 9:19 PM

If we're talking non-Logos stuff, Jerome Murphy O'Connor's book is fantastic. And may he rest in peace, he was a real scholar and a gentleman!

The Holy Land: An Oxford Archaeological Guide No archaeological training needed, of course.

"The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of Conservatives is to prevent mistakes from being corrected."- G.K. Chesterton

Page 1 of 1 (18 items) | RSS