In 2016 What is the priority order of your Top 10 Bibles in Logos and why?

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P A | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Feb 12 2016 11:42 AM

What is the priority order of your Top 10 English Bibles in Logos and why?

Please no links to previous posts or threads I want this to be current (2016)

Thank you

P A Geeked

Posts 12699
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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 12:09 PM
  1. 2011 NIV
  2. ESV
  3. NKJV
  4. 1984 NIV
  5. KJV
  6. LEB
  7. NET
  8. NASB95
  9. NIrV
  10. NLT

(1) Is my preferred translation to read, and (2) my preferred translation to study.

(3) through (5) are others those most likely to be used by people in my church.

(6) through (10) represent a wide range of translation philosophies from very literal or fairly paraphrastic.

Posts 879
P A | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 12:23 PM

Thanks Mark

I find it interesting you still consult NIV 84. I like a lot of people was concerned when they replaced it with NIV 2011.

But now I regard NIV 84 as ancient history, I want to use the latest version of a translation,

My top 2 are the reverse of yours ESV (reading and study) NIV 2011 (preaching),

P A

Posts 2653
Doc B | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 12:26 PM

1. ESV

2. HCSB

3. NIV84

4. NASB95

5. LGNTI:SBL

6. NKJV

7. AV

(no more are prioritized, though if they were available I'd use Wycliffe, Geneva, and either Bishop's or Tyndale to round out ten.)

The first three are there via a combination of familiarity and favoritism (based on translation style and conservative scholarship). The rest are for comparison purposes.

My thanks to the various MVPs. Without them Logos would have died early. They were the only real help available.

Faithlife Corp. owes the MVPs free resources for life.

Posts 879
P A | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 12:31 PM

Doc B

No NIV 2011 why?

P A

Posts 3456
Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 12:48 PM

1. NASB95: has been the standard literal translation for a while. By far, the most used and default Bible for me. Good cross-references.

2. ESV: I use it sometimes, esp. b/c of the audio in Logos and sometimes it's used in church. Don't have anything against it, just a bit weary of all the new translations. 

3. NIV: Just because it is so much used, I look how it words specific passages. Used by my church too. 

4. NLT: A pleasure to read that I grant myself sometimes, but too interpretive to be my first go. Nice when trudging through denser passages such as Daniel 9-11.

5. NRSV, NKJV: the first still has scholarly currency and includes apocryphal books when I need to consult them. The second represents the Majority Text and I love listening to the Word of Promise audio Bible which is based on it. 

6. NET: consult occasionally specifically for translational notes. 

I only read from the NASB95, ESV, and NLT. I consult the others.

Posts 879
P A | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 12:52 PM

Ok here is my list.

1 ESV (reading & study)

2 NIV 2011 (preaching)

3 NASB 95 (more literal translation)

4 NRSV   (Not evangelical)

5 REB      (British Not evangelical)

6 NKJV    (NT based on Textus Receptus)

7 Tanakh 1985 (Jewish)

8  NCV (Easy to read, I love it)

9 Good News Translation  (Classic easy to read)

10 YLT (I could not think of anything else, but I do refer to it quite often)

Much of this is very subjective, personal taste.I find the NLT too wordy. I think the HCSB is obvious replacement for those who love the old NIV 84.

Posts 1028
William Gabriel | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 1:43 PM

1) ESV, 2) NASB95, 3) HCSB, 4) NET, 5) NIV84, 6) NKJV

Grew up on NIV84, and around college starting going to a church that used NASB--learned a ton there and really appreciate the translation (though it is a bit wooden). About 10 years ago started going to a church where one of the elders was an executive at Crossway, so they used ESV. Smile  Now it seems to be the standard translation of TGC groupies [like me]. There are things I like and dislike about each of those three translations.

Added HCSB because their translation philosophy is interesting (even if simplistic). I've heard it jokingly called the Hard Core Southern Baptist version, which feels about right.

Added NET because they seem to do a decent job at translating and I really appreciate their stance toward copyright. Also love their transparency in translation decisions.

NKJV is there so that KJV-only users can slander me.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 1:47 PM

Mine change constantly based upon the project I am working on but is most commonly:

1. NRSV which is my preferred Bible for study and for defining the canon (ecumenical Western/Byzantine)

2. NABRE which is the assigned lectionary translation

3. JPS which is my favorite Jewish translation

4. LEB/LES because it is most compatible with the Logos tagging

5. NJB because the JB is not available - the latter being a common assigned lectionary translation

6. RSVCE because of the number of Catholic resources that utilize it

7. ESV because of the number of study bibles that use it - especially the Lutheran Study Bible (including apocrypha)

8. AV because of the number of older resources working off some version of it

9. D-R because of the number of older resources working off it

10. NET because the Community Bible is not available in Logos/Verbum so NET serves as my "new" translation. or REB because the NEB was what was used in college OR whim of the day

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 166
Al Het | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 2:00 PM

1.  NASB95 - The version I began with when I came to Christ, around 1980.  Nearly every verse I'm memorized is in this version.  Even if that weren't true, I love its "literalness." (I do realize that many current scholars, especially those who support the NIV HATE that characterization.)

2.  ESV - Another very "literal" translation, that many consider more readable than the NAS.

3.  NIV84 - Mainly as a third check, over and against the above two.  Also, I believe it is still the most used Bible out there.  I will usually read through any passage I am preaching on in this version, to check for any perceived incongruity I should address in the sermon.

4.  NLT - Easy reading, more of a paraphrase, but with excellent scholars who did the translating.  I sometimes see a different nuance on what the original might be saying, when looking in the NLT.

5.  HCSB - A good, solid translation.  I use it on my Kindle reader, because I picked it up for free.  It's a nice translation.

Posts 879
P A | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 2:01 PM

Thank you MJ Smith

JPS = 1985  I presume?

P A

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 2:06 PM

P A:
JPS = 1985  I presume?

yes

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 454
Nick Steffen | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 3:02 PM

The NRSV for study, JPS for its literary sensibility, the KJV for my church life, and the REB for its readability. 

Posts 44
Mikael S | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 3:03 PM

2016 prioritations as below, this is information remembered by heart - I do have a reading list with advanced prioritations:
1. 1971 RSV NT
, the 1959 39-book OT being a lower priority and so far used mostly the 1952 Edition of the OT when reading the OT from it, because of availability. As You can see I prioritize it highly, this is a go to version in the NT and what I sometimes pop-up-read in the 39-book OT on some of my installations especially tablets, or read the OT in print (or occasionally study in a software) when wanted the features of the versions.
2. The 2010 NABRE OT. Recent, + good narrative language. I like choosing a version that includes the Apocrypha even though I don't use those books from this particular version.
3. a) 1989/(2002) REB. There were some great scholar on the team both regarding original languages and denominationally, and interesting textual base (compromise) in the NT. Preferred version for some books from all of it's books, often consult the OT.
3. b) The version of Genesis in Torah: A Modern Commentary, in Ac (no other softwares seem to have it, want it available so I didn't go with a print Edition). My definitive go-to version for Genesis.
3. c) NRSV for books such as Sirach because of better textual basis than any other versions have, the NRSV doesn't compete much with my other prioritations as for example Sirach is omitted in many English Bible versions.
4. 2009 HCSB. Only thought about starting using it a Week ago - yet to read from it the first time ever, but thought it might contribute to my studies at least in the NT and why not look at the OT and buy the Reverse-Interlinear one day (WS, will not buy in Verbum). Reasons: alternative as a fairly recent version (the translation team used computers from start) - and someone said above that some who liked the NIV84 will enjoy this version, and because Arthur Farstad worked on the NT of it during the first Months of the translation project.
5. 2004 Good News Translation 3rd Edition UK-English, I usually read a few pages from or flip through in the print Bible, then go to study in a Bible Study software - I have it in all the Bible Study softwares I have (except in Acc in which I haven't bothered to aquire all necessary versions particularly because I barely have any "base-package" over there). This is a very good version. If I would have read the Bible in English in my teens, this (the preceding 1994 2nd Edition Anglicised) is the version I would have read, my dad did have the 1976 Edition (American English) but I gifted it away to someone in Africa through an organization that wanted Bibles to be mailed directly to people in need of one.
6. Moffatt, because he worked on the original RSV translation team and being a famous and referenced scholar, and for some of the uniqueness. Unfortunately I currently only have access to the NT (both print and in Bible Study software (WS)) unless I sit in a uni library.
7. Everett Fox's Schocken Bible. Yet to aquire.
8. a) NJB Reader's Edition, particularly the Gospel of Matthew - usually hunting for parts that were translated with the unique parts of Codex Bezae as textual basis.
8. b) Catholic Public Domain Version of Matthew 2-16 for parts which I don't read from the NJB. I have corrected it in this section to align with the text of NA27 regarding the obvious differences.
9. 2017 NAS.
10. a) 1984 NIV. I think I have it in 3 Bible Study softwares, not sure about one of the softwares whether it's included in it (the contents just say "NIV" and it's either from before the NIV11 or when that Edition was brand new) as I'm ordering the DVD (WS 9 Preacing Library) hopefully on Feb. 18. from Australia (if I can afford). I like the time-period of language, the early '70s or a little older from which the English language originates.
10. b) Versions that pop-up in resources such as The Complete Biblical Library Old and New Testaments done in the '80s-'90s (only available in one software which has the exclusive rights and it basically can't be bought as printed matter). EDIT: John Goodman just posted below about using the Info Pane in Logos, I use the resource The Complete Biblical Library Old and New Testaments for the same thing - it has excerpts from (they say) 100 English Bible versions!:

John Goodman:
[...] I then use the info panel to keep me aware of translation differences. ESV and NLT are a good combo because they take quite different approaches to translation.

10. c-f) original languages besides Hebrew and NT Gk: Coptic (yet to learn), Göttingen Septuagint select volumes (translation: 2008 NETS), Samaritan Pentateuch in translation to English (yet to aquire).
10. g) Writings from the Ancient World (16 vols.) in Verbum, want to learn the Akkadian alphabet later on years from now, Epigraphic Hebrew in Ac.
/Unix (I've stopped posting, have 2020 posts), I'm on Facebook and Twitter.

translatio-princpld...
10 Bibls.. Supporting the cause of the right for data

Posts 867
John Goodman | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 3:22 PM

I don't use many translations in that way. I use the NLT which is our pew Bible and the ESV with the multiple resource option set to show BHS and NA28. This works well at giving me the right original language text. I then use the info panel to keep me aware of translation differences. ESV and NLT are a good combo because they take quite different approaches to translation.

גַּם־חֹשֶׁךְ֮ לֹֽא־יַחְשִׁ֪יךְ מִ֫מֶּ֥ךָ וְ֭לַיְלָה כַּיּ֣וֹם יָאִ֑יר כַּ֝חֲשֵׁיכָ֗ה כָּאוֹרָֽה

Posts 1216
Matt Hamrick | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 3:40 PM

1. ESV because it is my carry bible and my favorite translation.

2. LEB because almost all Faithlife training videos use it.

3. NASB95 because it was my academic bible in school.

4. NIV84 because I prefer it over the new NIV and some people in church use it so I want to see what they are reading.

5. AV because people still use KJV and it's helpful to see how they read.

6. SBLGNT because it is a Lexham product I use in the software.

7. LHB because it is a Lexham product and again all Faithlife videos use it.

8. Logos LXX because it is a Lexham product I use in the software.

9. HDNT (ESV) because it's High Definition and a bookend to the list.

Posts 190
Stephen Terlizzi | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 3:57 PM

Here is the order of my main Bibles:

1) NRSVCE (Only OT) - For Old Testament Interlinear

2) RSVCE - For My Academic Studies and NT Interlinear

3) ESV - For Protestant Translation (Formal)

4) NIV - For Protestant Translation (Dynamic)

5) RSV2CE - Ignatius Study Bible

6) NABRE - Popular Bible (Dynamic)

7) D-R - For the Latin Vulgate

8) YLT - Very Literal Translation

9) NET - For the Translator Notes

Agape,

Steve

Posts 2073
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 3:58 PM

I use the ESV first and the CJB second. I pretty much ignore the rest. The CJB is our congregation's choice, and I pull it up for readings, but I like the ESV for study. Anything else means I want to know what the original language says. I do consult other translations, but not for primary exegesis. 

I'm starting to read the KJV more. I've not prioritized it, but that may change.

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

Posts 2653
Doc B | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 8:30 PM

P A:
No NIV 2011 why?

I personally don't care for the (in my opinion, PC) changes they made to the text. While I've never been a huge fan of the NIV translation style, I really like its readability. The 2011 changes worsened the translation style issues and added nothing to the readability, in my view.

I will usually stand by the old adage that every translation is a commentary. I find the ESV to be my favorite commentary on Hebrew and Greek scripture. Wink

My thanks to the various MVPs. Without them Logos would have died early. They were the only real help available.

Faithlife Corp. owes the MVPs free resources for life.

Posts 879
P A | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2016 12:12 AM

Hi Michael S

Mikael S:
9. 2017 NAS

What does this mean?  NASB 2017?

Thanks

P A

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