Loose vs Lose

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Posts 271
Don | Forum Activity | Posted: Sun, Mar 14 2010 4:21 PM
To loose is to set free.

To lose is to misplace, or not be able to find.
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Paul Golder | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Mar 14 2010 4:25 PM

But what if I wanted to loose something, but ended up losing it first? Wink

"As any translator will attest, a literal translation is no translation at all."

Posts 1178
David Wilson | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Mar 14 2010 5:12 PM

If we go back but a few years in history, we would realise these are the same.

"Tis lost because it was too loose.

Happens with boats.  Happens with horses.

Some things just tend to set themselves free......

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Mar 14 2010 5:40 PM

Or I could point out that they are variants of the same Proto-IndoEuropean root  *leu- which shows up in Sanskrit as the verb meaning "to cut"Geeked

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 769
Alan Charles Gielczyk | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Mar 14 2010 11:34 PM

lose-– ORIGIN Old English losian ‘perish, destroy’, also ‘become unable to find’, from los ‘loss’.
Catherine Soanes and Angus Stevenson, Concise Oxford English Dictionary, 11th ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).

loose-– ORIGIN Middle English loos ‘free from bonds’, from Old Norse lauss, of Germanic origin.
Catherine Soanes and Angus Stevenson, Concise Oxford English Dictionary, 11th ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 15 2010 12:27 AM
lose 
O.E. losian "be lost, perish," from los "destruction, loss," from P.Gmc. *lausa (cf. O.N. los "the breaking up of an army"), from PIE base *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart, untie, separate" (cf. Skt. lunati "cuts, cuts off," lavitram "sickle;" Gk. lyein "to loosen, untie, slacken," lysus "a loosening;" L. luere "to loose, release, atone for"). Replaced related leosan (a class II strong verb whose pp. loren survives in forlorn and love-lorn), from P.Gmc. *leusanan (cf. O.H.G. virliosan, Ger. verlieren, O.Fris. urliasa, Goth. fraliusan "to lose"). Transitive sense of "to part with accidentally" is from c.1200. Meaning "to be defeated" (in a game, etc.) is from 1530s. To lose (one's) mind "become insane" is attested from c.1500. To lose out "fail" is 1858, Amer.Eng.

loose (adj.) 
c.1300, from O.N. lauss "loose, free, vacant, dissolute," cognate with O.E. leas "devoid of, false, feigned, incorrect," from P.Gmc. *lausaz (cf. Dan. løs "loose, untied," M.Du., Ger. los, Goth. laus), from PIE *lau-/*leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart" (see lose). The verb is first recorded early 13c., "to set free." Sense of "unchaste, immoral" is recorded from late 15c. Figurative sense of loose cannon was in use by mid-20c.

Do you suppose this is off topic? May I suggest that Logos needs to provide a Proto-IndoEuropean dictionary to support Latin and Greek; and Proto-AfroAsiatic for Hebrew, Aramaic, Syriac and Coptic?

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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