Footnotes not going into Word - any ideas?

Page 1 of 1 (10 items)
This post has 9 Replies | 2 Followers

Posts 57
Aaron Baldridge | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Dec 29 2016 12:44 PM

I noticed this afternoon that when L7 updated it must have done something with the way that Logos copies into Word and PPT. Normally when I paste text from a commentary or book into a Word document it places a footnote for the quotation. Very handy indeed, especially for academic writing.

However, this afternoon while working on a sermon for Sunday when I cut and pasted it puts the bibliographic info at the end of the quotation rather than a footnote. I checked and the chosen "format" is SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd edition. (It had defaulted to APA somehow, but I changed it back.)

Posts 15805
Forum MVP
Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 29 2016 3:15 PM

What is your Program Setting for Copy Footnotes as ?

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 57
Aaron Baldridge | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 29 2016 4:34 PM

Auto. I tried switching it to "Footnote" and this setting caused there to be no citation at all. :( 

Posts 57
Aaron Baldridge | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Dec 30 2016 5:59 AM

I noticed this morning that there was another thread regarding this problem from a couple of months ago and a new "work around" until a fix is available. Technology is a wonderful thing and I am thankful for both Word and Logos that make sermon preparation much, much easier. 

Posts 490
R. Mansfield | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Dec 30 2016 8:04 AM

There's a bug in the current Mac version of Word (15.29.1) that is causing all kinds of problems like this for numerous programs. Supposedly those running the beta of 15.31.x say that it's fixed. Not certain when that will be released though.

RMansfield@mac.com
http://thislamp.com 
youtube.com/user/rfmansfield
twitter/thislamp
facebook.com/rmansfield

Posts 262
Jonathan Bradley | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Dec 30 2016 7:54 PM

Aaron Baldridge:

I noticed this afternoon that when L7 updated it must have done something with the way that Logos copies into Word and PPT. Normally when I paste text from a commentary or book into a Word document it places a footnote for the quotation. Very handy indeed, especially for academic writing.

However, this afternoon while working on a sermon for Sunday when I cut and pasted it puts the bibliographic info at the end of the quotation rather than a footnote. I checked and the chosen "format" is SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd edition. (It had defaulted to APA somehow, but I changed it back.)

Check out the workaround on this thread: https://community.logos.com/forums/t/133854.aspx

Posts 521
Russ White | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Dec 31 2016 6:31 AM

Aaron Baldridge:
I noticed this afternoon that when L7 updated it must have done something with the way that Logos copies into Word and PPT. Normally when I paste text from a commentary or book into a Word document it places a footnote for the quotation. Very handy indeed, especially for academic writing.

I would be VERY careful with this, as most of the citations created by Logos are incorrect, and will get you major points off if you actually turn in a paper using them. It's much better to pull what information you can from Logos into something like Zotero (which is free), correct the various problems, and then use the outside software to manage your actual citations correctly. As an instance, go into any journal or encyclopedia, copy a section of an article, and paste it into Word. Is the author actually correct? The name of the journal and the name of the article? In my experience, the answer is "no" 90%+ of the time. 

I don't blame this entirely on Faithlife, as they often just consume resources from other providers "as they are," with some moderately useful additional tagging/etc. OTOH, I do often pay more for a resource in Logos than I do in other formats, so there should be at least some thought towards getting these things right, I'd think (?).

But the bottom line is this -- don't use the citations from Logos directly. 

Russ

Posts 262
Jonathan Bradley | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Dec 31 2016 9:01 AM

Russ White:

Aaron Baldridge:
I noticed this afternoon that when L7 updated it must have done something with the way that Logos copies into Word and PPT. Normally when I paste text from a commentary or book into a Word document it places a footnote for the quotation. Very handy indeed, especially for academic writing.

I would be VERY careful with this, as most of the citations created by Logos are incorrect, and will get you major points off if you actually turn in a paper using them. It's much better to pull what information you can from Logos into something like Zotero (which is free), correct the various problems, and then use the outside software to manage your actual citations correctly. As an instance, go into any journal or encyclopedia, copy a section of an article, and paste it into Word. Is the author actually correct? The name of the journal and the name of the article? In my experience, the answer is "no" 90%+ of the time. 

I don't blame this entirely on Faithlife, as they often just consume resources from other providers "as they are," with some moderately useful additional tagging/etc. OTOH, I do often pay more for a resource in Logos than I do in other formats, so there should be at least some thought towards getting these things right, I'd think (?).

But the bottom line is this -- don't use the citations from Logos directly. 

Russ

I never lost any points for citations that were wrong via logos in Seminary. 

Posts 521
Russ White | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 4 2017 12:54 PM

Jon Bradley:
I never lost any points for citations that were wrong via logos in Seminary.

Go to this url --

https://ref.ly/logosres/niebc;hw=Isaac

Copy out a sentence like this --

While the Bible sets Isaac before us, it does not explain him. But there are things about Isaac crying out to be slotted into some picture that makes sense of the man.

Paul Douglas Gardner, New International Encyclopedia of Bible Characters: The Complete Who’s Who in the Bible (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House, 2001), 268.

This citation is completely wrong. Paul Douglas Garner did not write that entry. According to the bottom of the entry, J.A.M. did. To properly build a citation for this quote, you need to go to the biblio information for the encyclopedia, find out who J.A.M. is, and build an entry citation, rather than a book citation. The citation Logos provides is not giving proper credit to the actual author. I've lost points on papers for this several times. A few other examples, just poking randomly through my library --

==

https://ref.ly/logosres/ndictheo;ref=Page.p_76;off=3301

Born into a Swiss theological family, Barth studied in Berne, Berlin, Tübingen and Marburg under some of the leading teachers of the day, notably Harnack and Herrmann, and after a brief period working for the journal Die christliche Welt (The Christian World) and as an assistant pastor in Geneva, he became a village pastor at Safenwil in the Aargau from 1911–21.

Sinclair B. Ferguson and J.I. Packer, New Dictionary of Theology (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2000), 76.

==

https://ref.ly/logosres/dicthintbbl;ref=Page.p_185;off=2018

This is a historical designation used initially in English-speaking scholarship to describe the ideological program of the eighteenth-century French philosophes, but which became a general descriptor identifying the eighteenth century as a progressive social epoch, promoting secular intellectual freedom and representative government against the oppressive forces of tradition.

Kevin J. Vanhoozer et al., eds., Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible (London; Grand Rapids, MI: SPCK; Baker Academic, 2005), 185.

==

https://ref.ly/logosres/dpl;ref=Page.p_8;off=4821

In 2 Corinthians 11:22 Paul, in response to the boasts of his opponents in Corinth, calls himself a descendant of Abraham. Most scholars agree that by designating himself a “descendant of Abraham” Paul has more in mind than ethnic derivation. For example, R. P. Martin suggests that Paul is using the term for himself “as a badge of honor to mark out his Christian self-identity over against his rivals” (Martin, 375).

Gerald F. Hawthorne, Ralph P. Martin, and Daniel G. Reid, eds., Dictionary of Paul and His Letters (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1993), 8.

==

https://ref.ly/logosres/gs-ctj-09;ref=VolumeNumberPage.V_9,_N_28,_p_369;off=2103;ctx=_view.$0AIntroduction$0A~How_nondispensationa

How nondispensationalists handle New Testament statements using temple imagery can often confuse dispensationalists. Certainly, most nondispensationalists hold that many of the references to the temple in the Gospels should be understood as the concrete Jewish temple of the first century.

9, no. 28 (2005): 369.

https://ref.ly/logosres/gs-emj-07;art=title;off=108;ctx=tance_of_the_Church$0A~The_doctrine_of_the_

The doctrine of the church (ecclesiology) is one of the great subjects of systematic theology. It is primarily a New Testament doctrine; the word church does not occur in the Old Testament. The historical development of ecclesiology can be traced back to ancient writers such as Irenaeus, Cyprian, and Augustine.3 These men stressed the external unity of the church. However, much of our understanding of the universal church was developed much later during the time of the Reformation.

Emmaus Journal 7 (1998).

==

https://ref.ly/logosres/gs-jets-17;ref=VolumeNumberPage.V_17,_N_4,_p_205;off=767;ctx=Massachusetts_01201$0A~Surprisingly_enough_

Surprisingly enough the discussion of Biblical inerrancy swirls around us with almost the same ferocity as in the 1880s and the 1930s. The stance was taken then, namely by B. B. Warfield and J. Gresham Machen, that the traditional view of Biblical inerrancy should not be compromised by the promulgation of a limited view of inspiration.

Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 17, no. 4 (1974): 205.

==

https://ref.ly/logosres/sc-dj068;art=dj068.01;off=187;ctx=_by_Phil_Boatwright$0A~A_stiff_wind_blows_i

A stiff wind blows in from the Sea of Galilee. It sweeps the hair away from our faces and the weariness of travel from our minds. Though our tour group is not alone—several busloads of other tourists have also debarked—the site isn’t crowded. The little octagonal church that commemorates the Sermon on the Mount rests in a lonely place, far from the towns and cities of present-day Galilee.

Discipleship Journal, Issue 68 (March/April 1992) (NavPress, 1992).

==

Logos is a research tool, this sort of thing should be so rare as to be hard to find -- but I can find hundreds of incomplete, improperly formatted, etc., citations. There are more subtle errors -- citing the "logos edition" for no particular reason, problems mixing up authors and editors, etc. It doesn't matter whether or not you've never had "points off" for this sort of thing; it's just sloppy on the part of a company that says it is serious about scholarship. 

Russ

Posts 26467
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 4 2017 1:13 PM

Russ, thanks for the documentation of the problem. IIRC the separation of the author of individual sections is a (relatively) new feature of Logos coding. You illustrate a portion of a broader problem of the users' need to know the level of items tagged in a resource. I have resources that still lack the coding for 1 Maccabees being biblical in some canons.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Page 1 of 1 (10 items) | RSS