NT Greek "Sentence Exposition" - Resource to get the valid range of meanings?

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Posts 41
Bob | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Mar 21 2017 3:41 PM

Is there a good way in Logos (or otherwise) to understand the range of parsing and meaning of Greek scripture verses from a purely lexical/grammatical/idiom perspective?

Note: I'm NOT just looking for something like BDAG with word meaning range. I'm more interested in parsing possibilities and syntax/grammar.

Motivation: As I learn a little Greek it has become more and more clear that very few of us (certainly not me) will become Koine experts to the point that we can authoritatively understand what the greek text can mean. But I still want to know what the actual statement in Greek means or may mean from the standpoint of the Greek language - even if some interpretations are more likely than others due to context, theology, extra-biblical information, etc.

Most of the interpretation in lexicons, dictionaries, exegetical commentaries, etc tend to mix a variety of judgement and input in order to present a range of viable interpretations. And they are also usually spotty in coverage, looking mostly to words and phrases of special interest.

There are also various sentence diagramming sources (Logos, Ramay's NT Greek in Diagram, and others). But they all make the decisions for you and basically present their viewpoint. I don't know of any that represent "all" the options.

With so many resources, surely there is something that provides a neutral analysis of what the words mean in the language, therefore deferring the decisions about the context or theology at hand to be done in our own exegesis?

Can anyone suggest possibilities, or am I being naive because I'm a Greek novice?

Thanks!

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 22 2017 4:54 PM

Bob:
I'm more interested in parsing possibilities ...

Logos Morphology tagging includes more than one parsing for spellings that have more than one possibility. For example, αἰτήματα (requests) in Philippians 4:6 can be nominative OR accusative.

Thread => What is your annotation/highlighting strategy? includes Greek Morphology visual filter highlighting screen shots on page 2 so can "see" range of verbal expression.

Bob:
There are also various sentence diagramming sources (Logos, Ramay's NT Greek in Diagram, and others). But they all make the decisions for you ...

Logos has a Sentence Diagramming Tool where you can import a passage followed by doing your own diagramming arrangement plus annotations. Forum threads => How to Import Sentence Diagrams in LOGOS 6? and => Sentence Diagramming 

Faithlife group => https://faithlife.com/logos-sentence-diagrams/activity has Sentence Diagram documents published from other users, which you can copy and modify.

For decisions already made, am Thankful for Discourse Feature propositions and Propositional Outlines (can use one at a time) for indenting/arranging text in a Logos Bible resource, which can be displayed (or not) as desired.

Bob:
But I still want to know what the actual statement in Greek means or may mean from the standpoint of the Greek language -

Suggest looking at the United Bible Society handbooks, which includes key concepts to translate plus cross cultural insights (without needing original language mastery). Logos wiki has reviews => UBS New Testament Handbook Series and => UBS Old Testament Handbook Series

Resource => UBS Handbook Series Old & New Testament Collection currently is included in two libraries: Verbum Diamond and Verbum Portfolio

Bob:
Motivation: As I learn a little Greek it has become more and more clear that very few of us (certainly not me) will become Koine experts ...

+1 Yes not me plus have experienced new meaning for phrase "That's Greek to me" since can read some while other passages are Greek to me.

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 41
Bob | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 23 2017 8:44 PM

Thanks Keep Smiling! Took me some time to go through... great info.

Some thoughts...

1) Did not realize the morphology tagging had multiple parsing possibilities. I'll have to pay more attention to see how comprehensive the options are.

The Morphology visual filter is, I think, one example of where many judgement calls have to be made by experts, instead of the range of possibilities. But I'll recheck this also based on the previous note about some multiple parsings.

2) I have the UBS Handbooks and they are great!!!! Haven't used them in a while. Will have to get back to them.

3) Yeah, I'm sure that some passages in Greek will always be harder than others. But after 6 months of diligent study, I already prefer to do my devotional reading in Greek (looking up some words as necessary, rechecking some against a parallel English translation, and leaning on my existing familiarity with scripture). Hoping it continues to get easier and easier. While it may just be the novelty, I think I'm addicted.

Posts 111
Richard Wilson | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 4:49 AM

A resource that goes close to what you want is the Exegetical Summaries series, although it is not complete. It might not give all the possible meanings of a sentence, but it gives the meanings that a wide range of commentaries have proposed.

Posts 41
Bob | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 1:14 PM

Richard - I appreciate you making the connection for me with that series. It's also a great resource, and it does do much of what I'm looking for. Unfortunately I've been spending a lot of time in the gospels, and it seems to not have volumes for large sections of Matt, Mark and John.

So extrapolating from the two comments, I observe a theme suggesting that exegetical commentaries in my library may collectively have more answers about syntax/grammar items than I realized. It will be helpful to keep that in mind.

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