For those that have used Logos for a while...a question

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This post has 43 Replies | 6 Followers

Posts 23
Eric Back | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Mar 25 2018 8:54 PM

I mainly utilize Logos on my MacBook, and on my iPad. I use Logos for searches, study, and reading but I also have a smaller collection of hardcover and paperbacks in a few bookcases. I mainly hang on to certain volumes that have sentimental value or are not duplicated in Logos. For example some of my "real" books were signed by the author in seminary years, some others are unique purchases such as Spurgeon's Sermon Notes from the 1800s, and yet others are old textbooks that I've long been familiar with or belong to genres such as poetry, literature, or a few children's books. 

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Veli Voipio | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Mar 25 2018 11:34 PM

I am happy with both. Mostly use digital anyway. 

I keep paper books for the most important ones. I am an engineer and I don't trust the technology too much.

Gold package, and original language material and ancient text material, SIL and UBS books, discourse Hebrew OT and Greek NT. PC with Windows 8.1

Posts 280
Charlene | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 12:26 AM

I've been with Logos since the days of CD Word...and I've gone the way of digital...I only buy a paper copy now, ONLY if it is not in digital format...but that is only after I have searched for a few days trying to find a digital copy! Big Smile Once I knew I would be traveling overseas to live and minister, I knew I couldn't take my large library with me. Fortunately I had already started getting books in the digital format, which later saved me space, money, and frustration once I moved.

Posts 372
Liam Maguire | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 1:26 AM

My only regret about going 'all digital' is that I did not do it soon enough. I have two bookcases full of books that I rarely ever touch and find myself wanting to rebuy the good ones simply so they will be indexed by logos. 

One thing I do struggle with though is a way to use Kindle and Logos together. I have some great books on Kindle but struggle to make proper use of them...

Check out my blog 'For Fathers'

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 2:59 AM

Brad:
For those that have had Logos a year or longer, are you satisfied with the direction you've gone?  Do you wish you would have purchased more physical copies of books?  More Logos copies of books?

For me, once I had most of my best commentaries in Logos, that was a tipping point. I no longer needed to look in two places for commentaries and simply stopped using paper ones. Now, 90%+ of my 'go to' commentaries are in Logos. 

Posts 676
Kevin A Lewis | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 3:20 AM

Veli Voipio:

I am an engineer and I don't trust the technology too much.

I'm not an engineer - just an IT bod - but I share your concerns. Some change is happening too quickly and we have little idea as to the nature of the destination.

Here you will mostly find technophiles and digital fans. However there are limitations.

I am practically convinced by the values of both. But as I say am cautious about the course technology is taking us. I.e. read and consider the implications in the apocalyptic prophecies of the scripture we follow!.

Shalom

Posts 993
EastTN | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 8:02 AM

I love, love, love physical books. But over the last 5 to 8 years I've gone almost completely digital.  Three things drove this.  First, for a while I was doing a lot of business travel. Stuffing two or three big paperbacks into my briefcase - some were fairly long trips - started adding enough weight to be noticeable. So, I bought a book reader for travel.  Second, I work in downtown D.C., and spend almost two hours a day on the Metro.  Once I had the book reader, I found it was much more convenient for my reading on the train as well.  Third, I went back to seminary at night and started doing papers on a regular basis. Once you have a critical mass of resources, researching with the tools we have now is soooo much easier than when I was in college that it quite honestly feels like cheating to me.

So, my family will still give me a couple of books on special occasions, just because I still enjoy the experience. But well over 95% of what I spend on books goes to digital editions.

Posts 215
Joshua Tan | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 9:24 AM

abondservant:

I'm in a position where I take them where I can get them. Sometimes that means Kindle (~1000 titles), sometimes that means in print (4-5000 titles), sometimes calibre (10k+sometimes logos (15000 +/-). 35k titles is hard to keep track of. I've been working on entering all of them into goodreads, and calibre both.

Feel free to add me on goodreads.

Those numbers. Wow. How do you read your books? All at one go or in small chunks? Do you skim through them or read through every word?

I take an extraordinary amount of time to read through my books. I did 17 cover-to-cover last year and already it looks like it's a feat I won't be able to replicate this year.

Posts 3593
Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 10:03 AM

I have chosen to go digital and by and large I really prefer that. I know someone who loves paper notes and is constantly frustrated trying to remember where this or that was written. The ability to search but also to modify or update records is by far superior digitally.

There is no integration in print books but in Logos you can consult, look up or link up with simple clicks. It saves lots of time and allows you to cover ground you probably would not ever try to cover with print books because of the work it would require. 

I agree also that portability is a great asset and the ability to ferret your resources in a way that is not possible in print.

With proper backup procedures and good practices, you can protect your resources and notes better than paper notes that can be gone forever in a fire or flood. 

There are some downsides to digital also. I, for my part, find that too much screen time affects my productivity negatively and increases mental fatigue. The luminosity of the screen (even though I reduce it) is still sort of mesmerising. 

There is also a stronger differential between the reading and the annotation planes in the digital world unless you use a really good quality tablet with a digital pen. Otherwise on a computer, using a mouse to highlight is not as natural or immediate as underlining with a pen or highlighter. Senses are important to processing and remembering information and I have a hunch that our senses are not engaged as well when performing digital tasks. 

I have not been able to afford so far something like a really good tablet/convertible computer that could possibly give the best of both worlds. In my dreams, I have a highly powered, e-ink (but working well with logos), and tablet (horizontal plane) with digital pen setup. Perhaps it would solve some of the things I feel I lose from working with digital rather than paper.

Overall though, I still value the advantages of the electronic solution vs. paper more. 

Posts 99
Brad | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 10:22 AM

I really am thankful for all the feedback.  Thanks to all who shared!

Logos 8 - Reformed Baptist Pastor - Student at MBTS - theologynights.com

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 11:40 AM

Joshua Tan:
Those numbers. Wow. How do you read your books? All at one go or in small chunks?

I don't have those numbers, but I do have quite a few. Smile For me, Logos is a search library, which means I don't only buy books I want to read, but rather books which I may want to search later. I do, of course, read some of them Stick out tongue

Joshua Tan:
I take an extraordinary amount of time to read through my books. I did 17 cover-to-cover last year and already it looks like it's a feat I won't be able to replicate this year.

Some read fast, some read slow. Don't let that bother you. I read more than most people do, but I consider myself fairly slow as well. Nothing wrong with 17 books! 

One thing, however, that I have done to increase the number of books I "read": For the past several years I have significantly increased my audiobook consumption. Two primary sources for me: Hoopla & Overdrive, both through my public library. I listen to books while driving, doing the dishes, excising, etc. Not all books are conducive to it, but many are. Smile

OSX & iOS | Logs |  Install

Posts 44
Daniel Bender | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 1:49 PM

Brad:
For those that have had Logos a year or longer, are you satisfied with the direction you've gone?  Do you wish you would have purchased more physical copies of books?  More Logos copies of books?

Brad, I am a pastor and also work part-time as a chaplain for a retirement home. There is considerable travel between the two sites. I am glad that I can bring my entire library with me on my laptop. I also have an iPad that I use primarily for reading. I do have a desktop at my church office that I prefer using. I have a 17K library and my brother is always asking me when do I find time to read all my books. I tell him that they aren't all for reading; many are for research. I do miss my physical books at times but they went for a good cause, they paid my sons orthodontist bill and helped my daughter through college (I kept the ones that are out of print or not yet in digital format). The transition for me took a while but I am glad that I made the change to digital. I do like that when I highlight a section it shows up on my other devices. It was always a pain to go through my physical books and rewrite my notes and comments for a sermon or devotional I was giving.

Thanks for posting your question; I've enjoyed reading others' comments.

Daniel

Posts 6069
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 2:15 PM

You know what they say, “ Once you go digital you never go back to print!” Imagine you wanting to study the gospels and have to carry the IVP dictionary on the gospels, your favorite commentary from each book of the gospel, BDAG, Louw-Nida, a concordance and a book of sermons on the gospels. Just carrying the IVP dictionary alone would be a mission. Not to mention opening all those books on a tight space. Meanwhile, I can carry all those in my pocket and open them in the trunk of a car if I have to 😁

DAL

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JohnB | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 2:26 PM

Joshua Tan:

Those numbers. Wow. How do you read your books? All at one go or in small chunks? Do you skim through them or read through every word?

I take an extraordinary amount of time to read through my books. I did 17 cover-to-cover last year and already it looks like it's a feat I won't be able to replicate this year.

Joshua,
Don't let that worry you. My wife is a slow reader and is very careful what she chooses to read. God will use you just as effectively as someone who speed reads.

One of the best preachers and church leaders I have heard (sadly not in my denomination!) was dyslexic. The first book he ever read was a bible given to him as a sixteen year old by his Bible teacher at his state school in the UK and he read it to prove his teacher wrong!! Biggest error of his life! When I met him he was lead minister in a large church. He had recruited a small team of 5 or 6 trained parishioners who he lent books to, to read and make annotated summaries based on his criteria. When he wanted to find out more detail than in the summary, he could easily go to the section he wanted in the book. 

Posts 2755
Erwin Stull, Sr. | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 4:17 PM

I've lost 2 small physical libraries due to floods, moving, etc., so the ebook technology was actually the way to go for me (even if I didn't initially like it).

Initially, it was kind of hard getting used to, as sitting down with a physical book under incandescent lighting was more comfortable. My theological library was the first that I built almost entirely in e-format with the exception of my standard translation and a couple of study Bibles; and Logos was/is my choice to build it in. The searching and research level I could not achieve using physical books. As far as the struggle between physical and ebook, there is none, and I'm quite comfortable reading on the computer. The phone is another story, because of the size, I have problems at times seeing.

There are just so many benefits in the e-format, that it is too many to begin discussing.

All in all, the more Logos resources that I can add to my library, the better.

Posts 6069
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 4:55 PM
I don’t worry about lending books and not getting them back anymore! When people have asked me if I can install my library in their computer I tell them, “Sorry, the Software requires me to log in with my personal email and password, my personal information is easily accessible when I’m logged in and that includes credit card information which means anybody clicking around can make a purchase, the library cost me too much money and it is ilegal according to the EULA...so, no, sorry no can do.” So digital all the way! DAL
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Erwin Stull, Sr. | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 5:50 PM

Veli Voipio:

I am an engineer and I don't trust the technology too much.

I don't trust it completely either, however, for most of my electronic data, I am confident being able to have multiple backups, on multiple media, and in multiple locations.

Posts 2755
Erwin Stull, Sr. | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 5:59 PM

DAL:

I don’t worry about lending books and not getting them back anymore!

That's funny. The 3 things that I tell people to never loan, are Records, tools, and books. For some reason, these are the 3 that you always have to hunt down. Smile

Posts 2761
Doc B | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 7:29 PM

Brad:
For those that have had Logos a year or longer, are you satisfied with the direction you've gone?  Do you wish you would have purchased more physical copies of books?  More Logos copies of books?

I've used Logos since L3, about ten years or so.

I never gave up my paper books, and won't. Honestly, if I knew then what I know now, I'd never have purchased Logos. I'd have twice the library and several thousand dollars extra with which I could do a lot of interesting stuff.

I do like the software, but don't find it essential, and have had more frustration with it than reward.

You asked.

My thanks to the various MVPs. Without them Logos would have died early. They were the only real help available.

Faithlife Corp. owes the MVPs free resources for life.

Posts 1904
Nathan Parker | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 26 2018 9:14 PM

The majority of my books are in electronic format. Now that I have an iPad with a high-end leather case, I get the "feel" for a quality book with the additional benefits of having it in electronic format (Logos, another Bible software program, iBooks, or Kindle).

Some books I can't get easily in an electronic format, so I get in print. I also keep the Bible versions I use most regularly in print, plus the biblical language texts I use reguarly, as at times I need to access those in print instead of electronic format.

Nathan Parker

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