Page 4 of 6 (108 items) « First ... < Previous 2 3 4 5 6 Next >
This post has 107 Replies | 3 Followers

Posts 3917
Forum MVP
Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 7:51 AM

George Somsel:
Doesn't this most generally fall under the rubric of "Introduction"?

True, it does get dealt with a bit there, very briefly in study Bibles, and a bit more in Commentary intros.  Still, in the Paideia series, you are ever present in the discussion of how the part fits into the whole.  You never really lose sight of it, and the big picture is brought to bear on the immediate--and I think the Socio-Rhetorical commentary does that too, but I have not used it much yet.   Not a totally novel idea, to be sure, but an approach that is not usually carried out with sustained focus in most commentaries.  I have really enjoyed the esv literary study bible for that reason.  It doesn't give me verse by verse explanation, but it gives tools for understanding genre and flow.  Though I have other things I might quibble with Ryken about, I have always appreciated his help in understanding the parts of literature of the Bible.

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

Posts 2793
J.R. Miller | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 9:50 AM

Daniel DeVilder:
Joe, I have to confess I have not heard of the first, don't really know the second, and rarely get into the third--though I have been intrigued by it.  Can you expand a bit on what they are and why you like them?   Thanks (in advance!)  :)
Sure.  All of these, of course, are in Logos.

 

Horae Homileticae: From the logos page, "Logos is proud to present Charles Simeon’s classic commentary, Horae Homileticae. These 21 volumes, featuring Simeon’s collected sermons, represent the fruit of his fifty-four years of preaching. Published originally in 1832 for the benefit of younger pastors seeking practical improvement at the task of sermon creation, Horae Homileticae reflects the rich source of Biblical understanding of its author, a towering figure in the history of evangelical theology."

What I like about HH, is first it has a convenient layout.  I can skim easily over the pages and dig where where I want.  Second, I think Simeon offers some unique thoughts on the Bible and good summaries. 

- Focus on The Bible: This one I got free when it was published by E4 and now taken over by Logos.  A bit more contemporary than HH, but it seems to consistently offer something different than other commentaries.

- Preacher's Commentary When I was preaching through Acts, I really liked the contribution from, Lloyd J. Ogilvie and Luke by Bruce Larson was also good.  This is obviously a compilation of people's sermons, so what I like is reading how others have applied the text to their different contexts.   Sometimes, it gives me thoughts of stuff I really would never say and sometimes some good insights and practical  examples that get me thinking.

Hope that helps brother.Smile

 

My Books in Logos & FREE Training

Posts 2793
J.R. Miller | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 9:56 AM

Daniel DeVilder:

George Somsel:
Please quote.  In the Newsgroup we knew immediately to whom you were replying and thereby what you were referencing.  Here we do not have that (Newsgroups FOREVER).  What are "first", "second" and "third"? 

 

Sorry for my poor etiquette:

First, was "Horae Homileticae", second was "Focus on the Bible" and third was Pulpit Commentary.  Three commentaries Joe used frequently.

 

Actually, if you click on the word "replied"that appears after your name in at the top of each post, the forum takes you directly to the original post being addressed.  Kinda' slick!

 

My Books in Logos & FREE Training

Posts 390
Alain Maashe | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 10:18 AM

Daniel DeVilder:

True, it does get dealt with a bit there, very briefly in study Bibles, and a bit more in Commentary intros.  Still, in the Paideia series, you are ever present in the discussion of how the part fits into the whole.  You never really lose sight of it, and the big picture is brought to bear on the immediate--and I think the Socio-Rhetorical commentary does that too, but I have not used it much yet.   Not a totally novel idea, to be sure, but an approach that is not usually carried out with sustained focus in most commentaries.  I have really enjoyed the esv literary study bible for that reason.  It doesn't give me verse by verse explanation, but it gives tools for understanding genre and flow.  Though I have other things I might quibble with Ryken about, I have always appreciated his help in understanding the parts of literature of the Bible.

Commentaries that usually focus on exposition (such as the BST series) are more likely to trace the argument of a book. What I would like to see is more technical commentaries doing the same.

Bock's Luke in the BECNT pays attention the argument of the book in the gray section before the discussion of "source and history" and adds a summary after the exegesis and exposition section. since I mentioned Hoehner earlier, let me add that in the Ephesians commentary published by Baker, you have a section before the exegesis that shows the contribution of the passage to the argument and how it relates to what came before. I appreciate that in a very technical commentary. I cannot say the same for many of the technical series such as AB, Hermeneia, ICC

 I have two volumes of the Paideia series and I like the approach. this is even more apparent in books with complex arguments such as Hebrews.

As far as the Socio-Rhetorical commentary series is concerned, I see Witherington more concerned with rhetorical features of the passage, one needs to do a little sifting in order to find what he say specifically about the argument. I am not saying that the series is not useful (I am glad I have it), it is just not that helpful for what I am doing right now

Alain

Posts 9947
George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 10:18 AM

Joe Miller:

Daniel DeVilder:

George Somsel:
Please quote.  In the Newsgroup we knew immediately to whom you were replying and thereby what you were referencing.  Here we do not have that (Newsgroups FOREVER).  What are "first", "second" and "third"? 

 

Sorry for my poor etiquette:

First, was "Horae Homileticae", second was "Focus on the Bible" and third was Pulpit Commentary.  Three commentaries Joe used frequently.

 

Actually, if you click on the word "replied"that appears after your name in at the top of each post, the forum takes you directly to the original post being addressed.  Kinda' slick!

 

Aha !  Thanks for the heades upses.  I wasn't aware of that.  Yes, that is slick.

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

Posts 3917
Forum MVP
Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 10:18 AM

Joe Miller:

Hope that helps brother.Smile

 

Muchas Gracias.  I generally (arrogantly?) skim passed works older than 100 years, but I appreciate your comments about people having unique insight, etc.  I may need to look into them.  We actually have the hard copy of PC (called something else) in our church library, but I rarely walk over to use it.  I will have to, now.

Thanks again for your response.

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

Posts 3917
Forum MVP
Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 10:24 AM

On Commentary vs. Original Bible study:

We should know how to study for insight w/o reliance on (immediate looking to) other's works.  That said, i also think it a bit goofy to overlook the insight and teaching of commentators.  After all, it is only in book form what we do in spoken form in our SS and sermons.  If God gave us teachers according to Eph 4 and other passages, how far does that reach go?  My office?  My church?  My denomination? 5 years 50 years 1000 years?  Perhaps it is wise to consult commentaries, and a stewardship of the Holy Spirit's work . . .

Okay, but I admit, my most powerful preaching tends to come from times I have done most of the heavy digging first. (with prayer).  LOL, and times I think "I suck" (can I say that here???), God sends a gentle soul to tell me how good my sermon was ("okay God, you win again!!!!).

 

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

Posts 1145
Juanita | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 10:41 AM

Hi Daniel,

First person from Monroe, Michigan  that I recognize as a Libronix user!!  Great!! My husband and I live in Newport, MI.  God Bless.

 

 

 

Posts 3917
Forum MVP
Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 10:52 AM

Alain Maashe:
Bock's Luke in the BECNT pays attention the argument of the book in the gray section before the discussion of "source and history" and adds a summary after the exegesis and exposition section. since I mentioned Hoehner earlier, let me add that in the Ephesians commentary published by Baker, you have a section before the exegesis that shows the contribution of the passage to the argument and how it relates to what came before. I appreciate that in a very technical commentary. I cannot say the same for many of the technical series such as AB, Hermeneia, ICC

 

Yes, I had noticed that in the BECNT, too.  I remember seeing an overview of Hebrews commentaries and one of the critiques of Edrington (I think) was that he looked too much at the tree and missed some key points and connections that way.   Some of his conclusions were off, as a result.

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

Posts 9947
George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 10:54 AM

Daniel DeVilder:

Okay, but I admit, my most powerful preaching tends to come from times I have done most of the heavy digging first. (with prayer).  LOL, and times I think "I suck" (can I say that here???), God sends a gentle soul to tell me how good my sermon was ("okay God, you win again!!!!).

 

Yes, that happens.  I remember when I was in seminary on a summer internship in Canada.  I worked hard on my sermons doing reserch and polishing the language.  One Sunday, however, I hadn't been able to do my usual work on the sermon so I ended up finishing it in the pulpit.  That was the only time that someone commented that they liked the sermon.  Go figure!

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

Posts 3917
Forum MVP
Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 10:56 AM

JoanKorte:

Hi Daniel,

First person from Monroe, Michigan  that I recognize as a Libronix user!!  Great!! My husband and I live in Newport, MI.  God Bless.

 

What church are you with?  I am with Monroe Christian Church on S. Telegraph (past Albain Rd).  I know of a Lutheran pastor in Monroe who has Logos, but he seems pretty booked all the time.

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

Posts 3917
Forum MVP
Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 10:57 AM

George Somsel:
I ended up finishing it in the pulpit. 

 

That's par for the course for me, no matter WHEN I start.  But don't get those positive reviews with each one!

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

Posts 1145
Juanita | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 11:07 AM

Daniel,

We attended Redeemer, Stewart Rd., a church in Luna Pier and one in Tecumseh.  We've been at Integrity Christian Fellowship in Wayne for 8 years.  Are you in the ministry?

Posts 3917
Forum MVP
Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 12:46 PM

JoanKorte:

Daniel,

We attended Redeemer, Stewart Rd., a church in Luna Pier and one in Tecumseh.  We've been at Integrity Christian Fellowship in Wayne for 8 years.  Are you in the ministry?

Yes.  Our church is just down the road from Redeemer.  I have been meeting with area ministers, interdenominationally, for prayer each Monday.  Joe Atkinson, you might remember him, is a semi-regular there.  We have stopped it for the summer (not my idea!), but will resume in teh fall.  Anybody is welcome, and we have a mixture of pastors and "lay people" praying together for open doors in Monroe.  would like to see more church participate in it.  So far maybe just 10 or 12 do.  I have been to Stewart Rd and have interacted with some of the associates from that church (Sally Martin and Pastor Featurs.)

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

Posts 87
David Emme | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 5:03 PM

Thanks, Yes, I have quite a few "books" in actual book form, but my goal is when I go, I take my bible and my laptop and that is it. Same thing if I make my way to a seminary.

Posts 87
David Emme | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 5:19 PM

The first time I went to the Philippines and preached, I thought I was great and so did the people. More or less preaching like an Independent Fundamental Baptist as I am one of(sorry for cussing. I know some will view that moniker as a curse word). As the Lord worked in my life through the next year before I went back, I ended up preaching more expositionally as well as through a passage. It was more gratifying to myself. Not in a "psyched" way most IFB preachers are, but in a more settled way tat I know I edified, educated, and the Lord convicted. I am speaking of this because preaching has come up and the next part is hilaious. Me and my fiance from time to time would do some smooching and physichal affection. She stopped this all together. I asked her if it was something I did or said. She told me it was what I preached-she got convicted. Now that I think about it, it is hilarious.

Thanks to all who wished me well in my endeavours.

Posts 3917
Forum MVP
Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 26 2009 9:16 PM

I laughed and laughed when I read this.  Told my wife about it, too.  You're probably thinking: dang, I wish I wasn't such a powerful preacher!"

Anyway, no apologies on your church heritage needed.  People will think all kinds of things about all of us.  We are who we are.  We will say things that we both disagree on adn things will be said that will give us an opportunity to polish our peace making skills.  Surprise  My time in Germany taught me not to get too hung up on names.  I was just glad I came across people that actually believed Jesus rose from the dead.  Didn't matter whether you were Baptist, Methodist, Lutheran, E. Free, Church of Christ, or whatever.

Yeah, we will step on each other's toes (stomp, occasionally) but if I listen, I might just learn something from you!

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

Posts 2793
J.R. Miller | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jun 27 2009 2:02 AM

Daniel DeVilder:

Joe Miller:

Hope that helps brother.Smile

 

Muchas Gracias.  I generally (arrogantly?) skim passed works older than 100 years, but I appreciate your comments about people having unique insight, etc.  I may need to look into them.  We actually have the hard copy of PC (called something else) in our church library, but I rarely walk over to use it.  I will have to, now.

Thanks again for your response.

I tend to prefer the stuff that is a least 100 years old.  Obviously if it is about archeology or historical matters, it could be outdated, but I find so much more thought and depth in this older stuff that is hard to find these days. 

 

My Books in Logos & FREE Training

Posts 129
John McComb | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jun 27 2009 12:37 PM

Joe Miller:

I tend to prefer the stuff that is a least 100 years old.  Obviously if it is about archeology or historical matters, it could be outdated, but I find so much more thought and depth in this older stuff that is hard to find these days. 

I like the stuff that's around 2000 years old. It's written by people who were close to the events.

I have a diffiicult time with anything produced during the "Age of Arrogance" (past 200 years or so). Too much volume, not a lot of sincerity. Too many agendas.

Of course there are those authors you can rely on at all times like C.S. Lewis. Finding those favorites is hard to do though. Usually you either get the "bible/popular folk lore" mix or the "modernist bible/pop culture reconciliation". All slag as far as I'm concerned.

Yours in Christ

John

Posts 87
David Emme | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jun 29 2009 10:55 AM

Yes, I tend to chucle at that story now, but not when it happened.

My joke about it is not so much that I am a powerful preacher, but stopped preaching like a fundamental Baptist.

Yes, I do believe in self depreciating humor.

I have to honestly say, I probably learn more from Calvinistic authors more then anybody else. I especially like AW Pink and John Bunyan. Just got Owen's works and looking to get into his works.

I try not to get to hung up on names as much anymore, yet if you know differing theologies, you know in general where they are going to come from.

I do get somewha interested in the anthropoligical understanding of how different denominations, sects, and church groups come about. Just one of many interests

Page 4 of 6 (108 items) « First ... < Previous 2 3 4 5 6 Next > | RSS