Opening resource from footnote

Page 1 of 1 (4 items)
This post has 3 Replies | 1 Follower

Posts 145
Gregg Farah | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, Apr 18 2018 11:25 AM

When I click on a link of book in an article (or in a footnote), I get book reference info and the option to copy that to clipboard, if desired. However, what if I want to open the book to the page the footnote references? Or in the example attached, simply open the book from my library? (I do own the book) I understand that when clicking a Bible verse it will open Bible to that verse (as in the attached w/ Luke 9:23) How can I open the book to the footnotes page (if I own resource)?

Posts 13379
Forum MVP
Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 18 2018 12:57 PM

Short answer: You can't.

Long answer: Several years ago Faithlife realised that most of the bibliographic references in the software pointed to books that weren't yet in the Logos ecosystem. They hoped that in the future those books would be available in Logos, but when that happened, they didn't want to go back and add links to hundreds or thousands of older resources. But neither did they want the references not to link to anything. So they came up with a cunning plan. They created a special bibliographic citation format that queries a Faithlife server to determine whether the book exists in the Logos format. If it does, the server will send back the correct link so that the user could open the book as normal. This way, all bibliographic references can be linked, and those links will automatically become active once the book is available. There was only one flaw in this cunning plan. The web-service that was intended to return those links to the software has never worked. It always returns a blank entry. So you get a popup with bibliographic information, but no link. It's been that way for years. I have no idea whether Faithlife ever intend to fix it, but I am not holding my breath. (For clarity, this paragraph is true only for bibliographic entries that point to an entire article or book and produce the pop-up shown in the screenshot. They tend to appear only in bibliographies, rather than as traditional citations, which use the usual linking system.)

Posts 145
Gregg Farah | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 18 2018 2:14 PM

thank you for the reply! (albeit disappointing)

Posts 5257
DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 18 2018 2:22 PM

Another on the long list of FL great ideas never fully implemented implementented and they just move on to their next half baked plan leaving the remnants of that cunning plan behind along with endless user questions and disappointment.

Mark Barnes:

Short answer: You can't.

Long answer: Several years ago Faithlife realised that most of the bibliographic references in the software pointed to books that weren't yet in the Logos ecosystem. They hoped that in the future those books would be available in Logos, but when that happened, they didn't want to go back and add links to hundreds or thousands of older resources. But neither did they want the references not to link to anything. So they came up with a cunning plan. They created a special bibliographic citation format that queries a Faithlife server to determine whether the book exists in the Logos format. If it does, the server will send back the correct link so that the user could open the book as normal. This way, all bibliographic references can be linked, and those links will automatically become active once the book is available. There was only one flaw in this cunning plan. The web-service that was intended to return those links to the software has never worked. It always returns a blank entry. So you get a popup with bibliographic information, but no link. It's been that way for years. I have no idea whether Faithlife ever intend to fix it, but I am not holding my breath. (For clarity, this paragraph is true only for bibliographic entries that point to an entire article or book and produce the pop-up shown in the screenshot. They tend to appear only in bibliographies, rather than as traditional citations, which use the usual linking system.)

Page 1 of 1 (4 items) | RSS