The Five Solas Series

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Posts 2988
Milkman | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, Nov 21 2018 7:06 AM

Quick question: 

I recently picked up The Five Solas Series

For those who have this series do u think there's an order to read them? (pun intended). 

mm.

mm.

Posts 4679
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Nov 21 2018 10:46 AM

I think you should start with "How To Square Your Circle...Or Die Trying".

Five Solas. Roll Eyes

Posts 2988
Milkman | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Nov 21 2018 10:59 AM

mm.

Posts 6063
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Nov 21 2018 11:27 AM

Since they are “Alone” (solas) it really doesn’t matter where you start...after all, you are saved by grace alone, but wait, is not really grace alone, but grace through faith...but then again, is faith alone...so “Alone” doesn’t really mean ”Alone” but it means alone + another alone + other 3 alones...I’m confused now, but I’m sure I’m not alone on this. 😜

DAL

Posts 613
Michael S. | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Nov 21 2018 11:46 AM

I imagine they are so interconnected, it will not matter the order.  But maybe the order they were given in the Reformation:

Scripture, Faith, Grace, Christ, Glory.

Posts 6063
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Nov 21 2018 12:03 PM

Michael S.:

I imagine they are so interconnected, it will not matter the order.  But maybe the order they were given in the Reformation:

Scripture, Faith, Grace, Christ, Glory.

Or Glory, Grace, Christ, Scripture and Faith...logically, it makes more sense. 

The Glorious God showed Grace by sending His Christ (Son) and gave us Scripture so we can learn about Him and have Faith.

Now the order has been restored instead of “reformed.”

DAL

Posts 613
Michael S. | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 22 2018 4:00 AM

DAL:
Now the order has been restored instead of “reformed.”

"Restored", "Reformed"

"TomAto", "TomAHto"

Some, in this modern age, like to feel creative, whereas others want to keep with tradition.

Posts 6063
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 22 2018 6:10 AM

Michael S.:

DAL:
Now the order has been restored instead of “reformed.”

"Restored", "Reformed"

"TomAto", "TomAHto"

Some, in this modern age, like to feel creative, whereas others want to keep with tradition.

When you restore, things go back to the way they should be, when you reform you make a change here and there, and if you don’t like it you keep changing it and then is a big mess of changes....so, no, is not tomAto, tomaHto... there‘s a world of difference between restoring and reforming. 

Restoring keeps traditions already in place, reforming wants to get creative by changing traditions for whatever seems suitable at the moment 😉

DAL

Posts 663
James McAdams | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 22 2018 6:42 AM

Guys, come now. This isn't the place to be critical about one another's denominations/language/doctrines etc.

Posts 6063
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 22 2018 6:45 AM

Michael S.:

DAL:
Now the order has been restored instead of “reformed.”

"Restored", "Reformed"

"TomAto", "TomAHto"

Some, in this modern age, like to feel creative, whereas others want to keep with tradition.

Here’s a free simple but powerful lesson:

Restore: to bring back to or put back into a former or original state.  Biblical 👍😁👌

Reform: to put or change into an improved form or condition.  Unbiblical 👎 Because, as you said, “some like to feel creative“ and they think they can improve God’s way of doing things.  So you see, there’s a big world of difference 😉

You’re welcome 🙏 

DAL

Posts 6063
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 22 2018 6:49 AM

James McAdams:

Guys, come now. This isn't the place to be critical about one another's denominations/language/doctrines etc.

I did not criticize, I just offered a better logical way of reading the series, that’s all 👍😁👌 I was not the one who started saying, ”Some...etc.” The free lesson was just a Biblical fact nothing more 👍😁👌 

DAL

Posts 613
Michael S. | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 22 2018 8:01 AM

Logos offers many resources on the history of both the Christian Church as well as the development and propagation of the five solas of the Protestant Reformation.  I am sure this series will be a great addition to that long history.

In the New Dictionary of Theology: Historical and Systematic,

(https://www.logos.com/product/130897/new-dictionary-of-theology-historical-and-systematic-second-edition) we find this nice article:


Historically, the dominant theme regarding Christian approaches to other religions has been exclusivistic. While philosophical and socio-cultural factors have played their part, the foundational authoritative basis for historical affirmations of exclusivism has been the strongly exclusivistic tenor of the Bible (both OT and NT) which Christians have understood to be a true and unified revelation of God’s works and words in history. The constant theme throughout the history of Israel and in the founding of the Christian church is both the incomparability (none like him) and transcendent uniqueness (no other God) of YHWH, and Jesus Christ who is God incarnate (cf. C. J. H. Wright, The Mission of God, Nottingham, 2006, p. 82).
As a consequence of the nature and activity of God comes a secondary affirmation of the incomparability and uniqueness of both Israel and the church. There is no other covenant community like them, and there is no other community with a history like theirs, because the incomparable and unique God has covenanted with them alone and intervened salvifically on their behalf alone (see *Covenant; Salvation). However, with this theme of particularity also come complementary themes of universality, inclusion, diversity and tolerance (e.g. attitudes towards the alien and stranger; attitudes towards ethnic diversity, including the eschatological hope of Christians being drawn from all nations and languages; God’s universal care and sustenance of creation; the universal scope of the gospel and the universal mandate to take the gospel to the nations, etc.). Such exclusivity should never lead to vain glory or malice, for both Israel and the church are chosen by the sheer grace of God to display his glory, and have a unique responsibility and calling to be a light for the nations in both word and deed.
Although the exclusivist mood of the biblical testimony continued into the early church, the writings of some of the early Fathers, such as Justin, Irenaeus, Origen and Clement of Alexandria, indicate a willingness to speculate on the relationship between Christianity and other philosophies in matters of truth and salvation. However, it is *Cyprian in The Unity of the Catholic Church who is responsible for the slogan most often associated with exclusivism, ‘extra ecclesiam nulla salus’ (‘outside the church there is no salvation’), remembering his focus was that of schismatics and heretics rather than other religions per se. With Augustine, this axiom was strengthened. *Augustine’s teaching on original guilt, predestination, God’s sovereignty and efficacious grace gave a far more substantial theological and philosophical basis and reinforced Christian particularity. Within Roman Catholic teaching, exclusivistic interpretations of extra ecclesium nulla salus (albeit with some modifications) continued until the Second Vatican Council, when many acknowledge that in terms of the threefold typology, Roman Catholic teaching shifted from the exclusivist paradigm into the inclusivist paradigm (see F. A. Sullivan, Salvation Outside the Church? Tracing the History of the Catholic Response, London, 1992).
The Protestant Reformers largely continued the exclusivist heritage, not so much under the banner of extra ecclesiam nulla salus, but rather under their five solas of the *Reformation: sola Scriptura, solus Christus, sola fide, sola gratia, soli Deo Gloria. Calvin affirmed a universal natural revelation of God in all humanity, a sensus divinitatis or semen religionis, but claimed that because of the sinfulness of man, such knowledge was always twisted and distorted away from God (Institutes, 1.3.1–2) (see *Reformed theology).


Strange, D. S. “Christianity and Other Religions.” Ed. Martin Davie et al. New Dictionary of Theology: Historical and Systematic 2016 : 173–174. Print.

The Dictionary of Biblical Imagery (https://www.logos.com/product/30241/dictionary-of-biblical-imagery) has a short piece on Reform,


To reform means to reconstitute the life of an individual or nation and bring it into line with a moral or spiritual standard. In the Bible, stories of reform involve a return to an earlier standard from which individuals or nations have drifted. Such reform is implicitly accompanied by repentance.
The biggest grouping of reform stories in the Bible involves restoring the true worship of God after a nation has embraced idolatry. The prototypical reform story is that of Josiah, under whose reign the book of the law is rediscovered and a wholesale reform of worship instituted (2 Kings 22–23). Other OT kings institute similar reforms (2 Chron 15:8–19; 29–31). When the exiled nation of Judah returns to its native land, Ezra has to institute national reform regarding intermarriage with pagans (Ezra 10:1–15), and Nehemiah oversees similar reforms of worship and marriage (Neh 13). The prophetic counterpart of these historical annals consists of prophets’ calling a nation to reform (Joel 2:12–17; Amos) or picturing God as instituting the reform of his people (Ezek 36:8–38; Zeph 3:9–13).
The Gospels contain stories of characters who accept the conditions of salvation as taught by Jesus and subsequently reform their lives. Zacchaeus is a typical example (Lk 19:10), as is the woman who “was a sinner” whose life is transformed by Jesus’ forgiveness (Lk 7:36–50). We leave other Gospel stories confident that characters who have encountered Jesus reform their lives, even if the text does not tell their story of reform-characters like the Samaritan woman (Jn 4:7–42) and the woman caught in adultery whom Jesus charges, “Go, and do not sin again” (Jn 8:11 RSV).
No one in the pages of the Bible had his life more thoroughly reformed than Paul, as he sometimes notes in the autobiographical sections of his addresses or letters. The closest the OT comes to a conversion story—the story of Jacob’s wrestling with the angel of God (Gen 32:22–32)—is the turning point in the story of an obnoxiously combative man who becomes much mellower and more sympathetic after his encounter with God (see ENCOUNTER, DIVINE-HUMAN). At least two of Jesus’ parables, too, tell of individuals who reform their lives-the younger son who comes to his senses and returns to his father’s will (Lk 15:11–24; see PRODIGAL SON), and the son who conquers his surliness and reverses his initial refusal to work in his father’s vineyard (Mt 21:28–31).
Although stories of reform are not as numerous in the Bible as one might expect, this relative scarcity is somewhat misleading. The entire moral and spiritual tenor of the Bible—the whole force of its incessant commands, exhortations and wisdom sayings—is a continuous call to the reader to reform his or her life from the sinfulness that is the universal human lot. We can see this impulse in microcosm in the lists of virtues and vices embedded in some of the NT Epistles, which are nothing less than a blueprint for moral and spiritual reform.
See also CONVERSION; REBIRTH; REPENTANCE; RETURN.


Ryken, Leland et al. Dictionary of biblical imagery 2000 : 700. Print.

Both of those resources are on sale right now, and included in many packages.  Sadly, the OP mentioned series is not.  Since the series has different authors for the individual volumes, I suspect there is not "prerequisite" reading for each one.

Semper Reformanda!

YesBig SmileYesWink

Posts 762
Bill Anderson | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 22 2018 8:14 AM

Michael S.:

I imagine they are so interconnected, it will not matter the order.  But maybe the order they were given in the Reformation:

Scripture, Faith, Grace, Christ, Glory.

Or maybe:

Scripture -- since we wouldn't be where we are in Christ without God revealing himself.

Christ -- because all of the Scriptures point to redemption in Christ.

Grace -- because we can't be drawn to Christ apart from grace.

Faith -- because we are saved in Christ by grace through faith.

Glory -- the end of God's redemptive purpose. Big Smile

Posts 146
OMykeO | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 22 2018 8:50 AM

  Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes

Posts 371
Liam Maguire | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 22 2018 11:36 AM

DAL:

Or Glory, Grace, Christ, Scripture and Faith...logically, it makes more sense. 

The Glorious God showed Grace by sending His Christ (Son) and gave us Scripture so we can learn about Him and have Faith.

Or do we through Scripture come to know God in Christ through Faith and so receive God's grace resulting in his glory?

Both my statement and your statement are both true, we are simply coming at it from different starting perspectives and so have different emphases in our orders. Systematics... it is a slippery fish. Cool

Check out my blog 'For Fathers'

Posts 6063
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 22 2018 12:18 PM

Liam Maguire:

DAL:

Or Glory, Grace, Christ, Scripture and Faith...logically, it makes more sense. 

The Glorious God showed Grace by sending His Christ (Son) and gave us Scripture so we can learn about Him and have Faith.

Or do we through Scripture come to know God in Christ through Faith and so receive God's grace resulting in his glory?

Both my statement and your statement are both true, we are simply coming at it from different starting perspectives and so have different emphases in our orders. Systematics... it is a slippery fish. Cool

It depends on the perspective. How it all started or how it is for us now 👍😁👌

Posts 371
Liam Maguire | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Nov 22 2018 11:29 PM

DAL:

It depends on the perspective. How it all started or how it is for us now 👍😁👌

Exactly Big Smile. Have a great day, DAL.

Check out my blog 'For Fathers'

Posts 613
Michael S. | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 23 2018 6:48 AM

Bill Anderson:

Or maybe:

Scripture -- since we wouldn't be where we are in Christ without God revealing himself.

Christ -- because all of the Scriptures point to redemption in Christ.

Grace -- because we can't be drawn to Christ apart from grace.

Faith -- because we are saved in Christ by grace through faith.

Glory -- the end of God's redemptive purpose. Big Smile

Yes- maybe Big Smile

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