Cyber Monday Deals Are Up

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This post has 20 Replies | 3 Followers

Posts 1081
Sean | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Nov 26 2018 12:08 AM

On both Logos and Verbum:

https://www.logos.com/cyber-monday 

https://verbum.com/cyber-monday 

The Verbum one has some more interesting titles than what I saw for the BF sale (acknowledging very much that I am not the target audience there).

 Logos Now Subscriber -- 22/2/2018

Posts 875
Paul Caneparo | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 12:18 AM

Sean:

On both Logos and Verbum:

https://www.logos.com/cyber-monday 

https://verbum.com/cyber-monday 

The Verbum one has some more interesting titles than what I saw for the BF sale (acknowledging very much that I am not the target audience there).

Agree. A few goodies in the Logos sale. Notably for me:

https://www.logos.com/product/149599/reformed-expository-commentary

https://www.logos.com/product/149320/gospel-according-to-the-old-testament-series

https://www.logos.com/product/5459/niv-application-commentary-new-testament

https://www.logos.com/product/35459/the-cross-of-christ

And for those of us who rarely purchase from the Verbum site but who have a $10; survey coupon, this one looks worthwhile.

https://verbum.com/products/40917/the-greek-fathers-for-english-readers

Posts 1081
Sean | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 12:32 AM

Paul Caneparo:
And for those of us who rarely purchase from the Verbum site but who have a $10; survey coupon, this one looks worthwhile.

Yes indeed. This was my choice: https://verbum.com/products/49783/thomas-aquinas-and-karl-barth-an-unofficial-protestant-catholic-dialogue 

 Logos Now Subscriber -- 22/2/2018

Posts 666
James McAdams | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 2:20 AM

I wasn't planning to buy anything but couldn't resist Authorised at $2.99.

Posts 1823
mike | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 3:35 AM

$4.98 is how much I spent.

Posts 273
Greg F | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 4:35 AM

The Jewish Encyclopedia for 14 dollars is a crazy good deal.

I bought the Jesus and Archaeology course for 11 dollars.

Posts 16
Brad Knox | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 4:51 AM

IVP Bible Dictionary Series is a steal at $132.

Posts 6218
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 4:55 AM

 Not bad I got the authorized book, couple of mobile ed  Courses: one on Jesus and archaeology and the other one on foundations of Christian leadership.   All 3 for virtually 20 bucks.

👍😁👌

Posts 1049
Myke Harbuck | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 5:03 AM

Both the Black Friday and the Cyber Monday deals have been really good. I like how Mobile Ed courses are included, and discounted so deeply.

Myke Harbuck
Lead Pastor, www.ByronCity.Church
Adjunct Professor, Georgia Military College
Mac OS 10.13.6 High Sierra, Mid 2015 iMac, 2.5GHz i7, 32 gbRAM, 1tbSSD

Posts 28
Rob | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 5:58 AM

DAL:

 Not bad I got the authorized book, couple of mobile ed  Courses: one on Jesus and archaeology and the other one on foundations of Christian leadership.   All 3 for virtually 20 bucks.

Picked up Reversing Herman for 2.11 virtual dollars

Posts 100
Brad | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 6:28 AM

Anyone else having issues adding the reformed expository commentary to their cart?  Not showing up when I add it and then go to checkout.

Logos 8 - Reformed Baptist Pastor - Student at MBTS - theologynights.com

Posts 257
LogosEmployee
Celeste Fiorillo | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 6:39 AM

Brad:

Anyone else having issues adding the reformed expository commentary to their cart?  Not showing up when I add it and then go to checkout.

I just fixed this, give it a try now! (You'll need to refresh the page.)

Posts 10
LogosEmployee
Kristen Schafer | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 6:41 AM

Hi Brad, thanks for bringing this up. It looks like you already own several volumes of this commentary set and I'm wondering if that is causing issues with our system. I am looking into this and will get back to you.

Posts 6218
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 6:57 AM

Brad:

Anyone else having issues adding the reformed expository commentary to their cart?  Not showing up when I add it and then go to checkout.

Check your dynamic price, it might be cheaper with reformed base package.

DAL

Posts 100
Brad | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 8:38 AM

DAL:

Brad:

Anyone else having issues adding the reformed expository commentary to their cart?  Not showing up when I add it and then go to checkout.

Check your dynamic price, it might be cheaper with reformed base package.

DAL

I checked the reformed packages and can't find any that list this set part of the package.  Which one are you referring to?

EDIT - I was able to find it.  Thanks!

Logos 8 - Reformed Baptist Pastor - Student at MBTS - theologynights.com

Posts 1203
Mike Tourangeau | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 9:49 AM

Can anyone recommend "Dictionary of theological interpretation of the Bible" or "New International Dictionary of NT theology" in particular if one already has The Theological Dictionary of the New Testament and Theological Interpretation of the New Testament: A Book-by-Book Survey (as well as EDNT and TLNT

I am wondering if they would add anything different???

Posts 6218
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 2:59 PM

Brad:

DAL:

Brad:

Anyone else having issues adding the reformed expository commentary to their cart?  Not showing up when I add it and then go to checkout.

Check your dynamic price, it might be cheaper with reformed base package.

DAL

I checked the reformed packages and can't find any that list this set part of the package.  Which one are you referring to?

EDIT - I was able to find it.  Thanks!

Great to hear you found it. My bad,  perhaps I should’ve specified which package had it. 👍😁👌

DAL

Posts 6218
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 3:18 PM

Mike Tourangeau:

I just got this one: https://www.logos.com/product/5322/dictionary-for-theological-interpretation-of-the-bible  because it’s way cheaper than the original prepub.  So far, I like what I see and it really supplements other dictionaries by providing information others don’t have.

I have 30 days to check it out 👍😁👌

Posts 943
Everett Headley | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 3:22 PM

I did not find anything enticing enough to purchase.

Posts 6218
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 26 2018 4:23 PM

Here are a couple of samples from the Dictionary of Theological Interpretation:

Charismatic Biblical Interpretation

For “charismatic” groups, the communities that emphasize an individual experience of the Holy Spirit as well as an empowerment in spiritual gifts, the Bible is an authoritative revelation from God that must be read, proclaimed, and lived out as it offers the example of the “Spirit-filled” life. At the heart of charismatic biblical interpretation is the expectation of a personal encounter with God’s supernatural power. Charismatic Bible reading should lead to charismatic experience.
Charismatic movements are a worldwide phenomenon, yet a lion’s share of self-reflection on charismatic hermeneutics comes from North America and Europe. This article reflects a North American and European focus.


The Pentecostal Movement

While there have been charismatic movements throughout Christian history, Pentecostalism is the first such movement in the twentieth century. Two primary convictions for early Pentecostals were the restoration of beliefs and practices of the NT church, and the second coming of Christ. Christians should expect apostolic experiences from miracles to ministry, since a fully realized Christian life would prepare believers for Jesus’ soon return.
Early Pentecostal Hermeneutics. These convictions influenced a hermeneutic that viewed biblical narratives as a paradigm for modern Christian life. Of central importance was the “baptism in the Spirit” as described in Acts 2:1–4; 10:44–46; and 19:1–7. According to Pentecostalism as a whole, Spirit baptism was (and is) an experience subsequent to conversion, evidenced physically by “speaking in tongues,” and given for the purpose of empowering the believer to evangelize the world and minister through spiritual gifts.
This particular interpretation of the reception of the Spirit in Acts reflects what has been called Pentecostal “Bible Reading Method,” a precritical practice of reading all verses upon a particular subject, then harmonizing those verses into a consistent doctrine. This way of reading the Bible is both literal and immediate, with little awareness of a history behind or after the events and teachings recorded in the text. Pentecostal determination to see apostolic witness and life restored to the church is driven by a theological focus on Jesus as the Savior, Healer, Baptizer in the Holy Spirit, and Soon-Coming King—what many Pentecostals have called the “fourfold gospel” (the first Pentecostals would add “Sanctifier” to that list). It stresses an experiential desire for the Spirit-filled life as exemplified in biblical narratives, or the “full gospel.”
Beyond the formulation of doctrine, a Pentecostal hermeneutic is largely typological. Because the text must immediately apply to the life of believers, correlations have been made between biblical narratives and present circumstances without critical exegesis. Pentecostal preaching has disclosed Pentecostal themes throughout the biblical text, from Genesis to Revelation.
Along with a restorationist, Jesus-centric theology (a foundational text was Heb. 13:8—“Jesus is the same yesterday and today and forever”), Pentecostals have understood biblical interpretation to be guided by the Holy Spirit and confirmed by their experience. The role of the Spirit is paramount to Pentecostal hermeneutics. If the Spirit inspired the Bible, its interpretation must depend on the Spirit. When disputing an interpretation, Pentecostals appeal to the Spirit’s leading in their Bible reading.
Experience is sometimes viewed as so important to their hermeneutic that Pentecostals have been strongly criticized for exegeting their experience rather than the Bible. However, many Pentecostals understood their experience to be God’s confirmation of their interpretation, particularly with regard to spiritual manifestations. Spiritual manifestations during communal worship have been viewed as a sign of God’s blessing on whatever had been preached, even if Pentecostals outside of that local community rejected the sermon’s message.
Recent Debates in Pentecostal Hermeneutics. Since the mid-twentieth century, the Pentecostal movement has seen its members join the academic community and engage in critical biblical scholarship. Pentecostal scholars have rejected the earlier methods of Pentecostal Bible reading, with a precritical exegesis, while debate continues concerning the function of narrative, and the roles of the Spirit and experience in hermeneutics.
Contemporary works reflect the influence of evangelicalism within Pentecostal scholarship as much of the Pentecostal debate focuses on the comparison and position of a Lukan narrative theology alongside a Pauline didactic theology. Gordon Fee, a well-known Pentecostal exegete, has strongly criticized the didactic value of biblical narratives within Pentecostalism, leading to a critique of Spirit baptism following conversion and “speaking in tongues” as evidence of received baptism. However, other Pentecostal scholars have rejected that critique as an attack on the very basis of Pentecostalism. To answer Fee and others, they include the paradigmatic role of biblical narratives as part of authorial intent and argue for a “charismatic” pneumatology based on Luke-Acts alongside Paul’s soteriological pneumatology.
Most recently, scholars have debated the need for a Pentecostal hermeneutic outside of an evangelical framework. Some argue for a postmodern hermeneutic that moves beyond questions of authorial intent to an understanding of the text as capable of multiple meanings in dialogue with the reader. These scholars attempt to build a hermeneutic in dialogue with such thinkers as Paul Ricoeur, Martin Heidegger, Hans-Georg Gadamer, and Jürgen Habermas.
Another discussion concerns what essentials would make a hermeneutic “Pentecostal.” The role of the Spirit in interpretation is given primary emphasis, though some scholars worry that it leads to a dualistic hermeneutic. Other essentials include the dialogical role of experience and openness to the authority of biblical narratives.
While Pentecostal scholars work on a hermeneutical method open to Pentecostal experience and acceptable to the academic community as a whole, much of the scholarly discussion has had only a moderate impact on local Pentecostal communities that continue to practice a largely precritical and typological hermeneutic.


The Charismatic Movement

The “charismatic movement” is a term commonly applied to Baptists, Catholics, Episcopalians, Lutherans, Methodists, Presbyterians, Orthodox, and other non-Pentecostal Christians who accepted in whole or in part the Pentecostal message, with a confirming experience of the Spirit, though they did not leave their respective denominations. By the 1960s, this reception became a nationally recognized phenomenon, with charismatic movements found in many historic denominations.
Charismatic Hermeneutics. Since a primary charismatic concern is spiritual renewal within traditional denominations, many charismatics interpret Scripture within their own theological tradition. However, they do bring to the subject of hermeneutics a belief in the personal relevance of Scriptures concerning the Spirit-filled life, especially those that focus on charisms (e.g., 1 Cor. 12:8–10). Charismatics also see the paradigmatic value of biblical narratives, though they reject some of the ways Pentecostals have interpreted those narratives. Many do not accept the interpretation of Spirit baptism (this term is also disputed) as a subsequent work of grace or “speaking in tongues” as its necessary evidence.
Charismatic experience has led some to view Scripture in a new way. Many charismatics report a renewed focus on Christ, which has led to a fresh commitment to the authority of the Bible as God’s word about Christ. A deeper appreciation of the Spirit’s role in interpretation has also been cited as a contribution of the charismatic renewal to more traditional hermeneutical approaches. According to Richard Quebedeaux, Scripture is understood only through the Holy Spirit, who makes known the “living, ‘dynamic’ word of God,” to which Scripture is subservient.
Charismatic scholars such as Paul Hinnebusch stress the recovery of a personal meaning in Scripture among charismatics, many of whom prayerfully engage in a “directive use of Scripture,” believing that the Bible can give specific answers to personal situations. Mark Stibbe adds that charismatics also rely on “a community of shared experience” in interpreting and applying Scripture to their lives. Drawing on the work of thinkers like Ricoeur, they argue that Scripture can have multiple meanings under the leading of the Spirit, though these meanings may be valid only to the person reading and may not supersede doctrine or good exegesis. Some scholars, though, want to distinguish between the usage of Scripture and its interpretation. Others such as Clark Pinnock strive to maintain a balance between biblical authority, doctrinal tradition, and the freedom of the Spirit, a balance not always found among other charismatics.
Recent Trends in Charismatic Hermeneutics. Since the 1980s, new types of charismatic groups have arisen with their own unique emphases in Christian spirituality, including “signs and wonders” as a means to evangelism, and “power encounters” with demonic forces. Critics have accused these groups of experimenting with Christian practice and then “proof-texting” various Scriptures to support those experiments—such as the “power encounter” teaching of Charles Kraft. These newer charismatics argue in turn for a more prophetic hermeneutical approach that keeps both the original meaning and the prophetic significance of Scripture in mind. The Spirit that inspired the original biblical authors also leads the charismatic community to recollect Scriptures that apply directly to their situation. There is an analogical correlation between the original meaning and contemporary significance of Scripture that is safeguarded from error by the Spirit and community discernment.
Restoration of the NT church as an eschatological event is also emphasized in some nondenominational groups who, as reflected in the writings of C. Peter Wagner, believe in the renewal of the five offices mentioned in Eph. 4:11, with special attention given to apostles and prophets. Restoration of the Spirit-filled life remains a guiding focus of these charismatic biblical interpreters, who seek to bridge a gap between reading the Bible and living the Bible.


Bibliography

Archer, K. “Early Pentecostal Biblical Interpretation.” JPT 18 (2001): 32–70; Arrington, F. “Hermeneutics, Historical Perspectives on Pentecostal and Charismatic.” Pages 376–89 in Dictionary of Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements, ed. S. Burgess and G. McGee. Regency, 1988; Fee, G. Gospel and Spirit. Hendrickson, 1991; Kärkkäinen, V.-M. “Pentecostal Hermeneutics in the Making: On the Way from Fundamentalism to Postmodernism.” The Journal of the European Pentecostal Theological Association 18 (1998): 76–115; Ma, W. “A ‘First Waver’ Looks at the ‘Third Wave’: A Pentecostal Reflection on Charles Kraft’s Power Encounter Terminology.” Pneuma 19:2 (1997): 189–206; Martin, G., ed. Scripture and the Charismatic Renewal. Servant, 1979; Menzies, W., and R. Menzies. Spirit and Power. Zondervan, 2000; Quebedeaux, R. The New Charismatics II. Harper & Row, 1983; Stibbe, M. “This Is That: Some Thoughts concerning Charismatic Hermeneutics.” Anvil 15:3 (1998): 181–93; Wagner, C. P. Apostles and Prophets. Regal, 2000.

D. Allen Tennison


Vanhoozer, K. J., Bartholomew, C. G., Treier, D. J., & Wright, N. T. (Eds.). (2005). In Dictionary for theological interpretation of the Bible (pp. 106–109). London; Grand Rapids, MI: SPCK; Baker Academic.

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