Personalized book lists

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Posts 59
Diego Lara | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, Dec 5 2018 9:27 PM

I will soon start doing a research paper on Ephesians 1:3-7  and I need to put into practice the research techniques that I learned during the course. I would like to be able to set aside only the books/journals/encyclopedias that are related to Ephesians 1:3-7. Is there a way to make custom book lists where I can go back to anytime?

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 5 2018 10:31 PM

Diego Lara:
Is there a way to make custom book lists where I can go back to anytime?

You could make a collection - see https://wiki.logos.com/Collections 

Posts 596
Jack Hairston | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 6 2018 4:14 AM

Diego Lara:

Is there a way to make custom book lists where I can go back to anytime?

 

You can also open all the resources in the collection and save them as a layout. If you don't know how to do this, just ask for step-by-step instructions.

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 6 2018 7:02 AM

Diego Lara:
I will soon start doing a research paper on Ephesians 1:3-7  and I need to put into practice the research techniques that I learned during the course. I would like to be able to set aside only the books/journals/encyclopedias that are related to Ephesians 1:3-7. Is there a way to make custom book lists where I can go back to anytime?

You have several options, depending on how you want to deal with these resources in the future:

  1. Collection
  2. Favorites
  3. Bibliography
  4. Reading List
  5. Tags

If you'd like, we can give more information about any of these, if you need it. For now, let me just give you the pros and cons of each.

  1. Collections
    • Pros:
      • You can restrict searches (for example) to a specific collection.
      • You can easily view a collection in your library.
      • You can fairly easily open all books in a collection.
      • You can convert collections into a bibliography.
      • You can share collections with others.
    • Cons:
      • You have to add the entire resource to a collection — you can't just add a specific article for example.
      • You only add a resource — not a specific location in the resource.
      • You can't add resources that you don't own in Logos.
      • You can't add any notes to a collection (for example) to remind you why a book was useful.
  2. Favorites (like favorites in a web browser)
    • Pros:
      • You can link to specific parts of a resource.
      • You can use folders to group links together.
      • You can fairly easily open all your favorites in a folder.
      • You can add online articles to favorites.
    • Cons:
      • If you have thousands of favorites it can be hard to find the right one.
      • Although you can rename favorites you can't really add notes.
      • Favorites help you to find resources, but they don't have any other users (i.e. you can't restrict a search to resources you've favourited).
      • You can't share favorites with others.
  3. Bibliography documents
    • Pros:
      • You can choose from multiple standard citation formats, which is more familiar in an academic setting.
      • You can link to specific parts of a resource.
      • For resources that support it you can cite articles, not just whole books/journals.
      • You can add a note to each bibliographic item.
      • You can share bibliographies with others.
      • You can convert bibliographies into collections.
    • Cons:
      • Many older dictionaries/journals don't support citing a specific article.
      • You can't add resources you don't own in Logos.
      • You can only open resources from a bibliography one at a time.
  4. Reading list
    • Pros:
      • You can add almost anything to a reading list, even things you don't own in Logos.
      • You can add subheadings, and limited notes.
      • You can link to a specific part of the resource.
      • Reading lists are public. Anyone can edit them.
    • Cons:
      • They're a bit more fiddly to set up.
      • Reading lists are public. Anyone can edit them.
      • You can only open resources from a reading list one at a time.
  5. Tags
    • Pros:
      • Very easy to set up.
      • You can restrict searches (for example) to a specific tag.
      • You can easily view a particular tag in your library.
    • Cons:
      • Not quite as versatile as collections and only a little simpler.
      • You have to tag the entire resource to a collection — you can't just tag a specific article.
      • You only tag a resource — not a specific location in the resource.
      • You can't tag resources that you don't own in Logos.
      • You can't add any notes.

I'm sure there are other pros and cons that I've neglected. But the best one of you probably depends on what you intend to do with the list in the future and whether you need to include non-Logos resources or add notes.

Posts 59
Diego Lara | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 6 2018 7:59 AM

Thank you for all of your replies. I will have to test the different options you guys listed and see which works best for me. But from the look of it I may take advantage of a couple of the options but Collections seem to be the solution I was looking for. 

Posts 313
Hamilton Ramos | Forum Activity | Replied: Yesterday 6:10 AM

Hi Diego:

JR Miller has a workflow to prepare sermons that could be compared and modified to your research prescribed methodology:

https://www.morethancake.org/archives/736

It follows a different methodology but takes into consideration similar steps to those suggested by other Logos power user like M. Barnes.

He creates special collections for specific steps:

roughly if I remember well:  exegesis commentaries, then also journals, etc. doing certain specific steps.

I guess that you can put important information found using specific collection search in favorites under the specific folder.

Depending on how you will structure your paper, you can have folders for:

announcement (prolegomena, reason, importance, framework constrains: guidelines, etc.)

presentation (actual angle that will be used )

problem (that which will you will actually study to try to clarify, solve, extract principles from)

reaction (how has the subject been approached and / or treated, what key groups, persons, etc reaction has been)

observations (facts, objective evidence, diachronic and intertextual underlying and overt thrusts)

analysis (rational methodology to organize facts into a valid theological construction, or application, or what you need to have as successful outcome)

conclusion (the actual hypothesis after your analysis)

horizon (possible spin offs that would be good to explore further)

Just a rough idea. Modify according to your particular prescribed methodology.

Within each area in favorites, you can then put sub folders that have the info per type of resource:

exegetical commentaries

intermediate commentaries

application commentaries

journals

reference works

then the different monographs according to key theological thrusts in the pericope.

That way maybe you can show with screen shots, screen cast or by real time presentation how you followed all steps using Logos.

The following resource has even better and more detailed ideas:

https://ebooks.faithlife.com/products/125799/quality-research-papers-for-students-of-religion-and-theology

Hope this helps.

 

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