Question on Verbum Home Screen This Morning - St. Peter's Chair?

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Deacon Steve | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Jan 18 2019 7:55 AM

When I open Verbum this morning I'm seeing a card for Peter (St. Peter's Chair at Rome), a Feast which is not until February 22.  I thought it may be a hiccup so I tried refreshing and also closing and reopening Verbum.  No change.

Is anyone else seeing the card with this information?  Why would be appearing today?

Posts 2351
David Ames | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2019 9:12 AM


He was a fisherman who became an apostle and leader of the early church.

Feast Days
February 22 (Chair of Saint Peter)
June 29 (Saints Peter and Paul)
November 18 (Dedication of the Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul)
January 18 (Saint Peter’s Chair at Rome)*   <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Old Calendar 
February 22 (Saint Peter’s Chair at Antioch)*
August 1 (Saint Peter’s Chains)*

Posts 5241
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2019 9:21 AM

Perhaps it’s there for us in Lutheran Anglican traditions who celebrate today as Peter’s confession of faith. 

-dan

Posts 200
David J. Wilson | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2019 9:24 AM

Yes, the card is showing on my system too.......

From : https://verbum.com/products/26956/pictorial-lives-of-the-saints 

FEBRUARY 22.—ST. PETER’S CHAIR AT ANTIOCH

Shea, J. G. (1887). Pictorial Lives of the Saints (p. 104). New York; Cincinnati; Chicago: Benziger Brothers.

JANUARY 18.—ST. PETER’S CHAIR AT ROME

ST. PETER having triumphed over the devil in the East, pursued him to Rome in the person of Simon Magus. He who had formerly trembled at the voice of a poor maid, now feared not the very throne of idolatry and superstition. The capital of the empire of the world, and the centre of impiety, called for the zeal of the Prince of Apostles. God had established the Roman Empire, and extended its dominion beyond that of any former monarchy, for the more easy propagation of His gospel. Its metropolis was of the greatest importance for this enterprise. St. Peter took that province upon himself, and repairing to Rome, there preached the faith, and established his ecclesiastical chair. That St. Peter preached in Rome, founded the church there, and died there by martyrdom under Nero, are facts the most incontestable by the testimony of all writers of different countries who lived near that time; persons of unquestionable veracity, and who could not but be informed of the truth in a point so interesting, and of its own nature so public and notorious. This is also attested by monuments of every kind; also by the prerogatives, rights, and privileges which that church enjoyed from those early ages, in consequence of this title. It was an ancient custom observed by churches, to keep an annual festival of the consecration of their bishops. The feast of the Chair of St. Peter is found in ancient martyrologies. Christians justly celebrate the founding of this mother-church, the centre of Catholic communion, in thanksgiving to God for His mercies to His Church, and to implore His future blessings.

REFLECTION.—As one of God’s greatest mercies to His Church, let us earnestly beg of Him to raise up in it zealous pastors, eminently replenished with His Spirit, with which He animated His apostles.

Shea, J. G. (1887). Pictorial Lives of the Saints (p. 53). New York; Cincinnati; Chicago: Benziger Brothers.

Posts 918
Deacon Steve | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2019 10:57 AM

Ahhh … Old calendar.  Hmmm.

Posts 142
LogosEmployee
Craig St. Clair (Faithlife) | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2019 12:22 PM

Mine too, and very curious. Clearly a Sedevacantist take-over of Verbum ;-).

I'll add this to the list of things for the resource team to fix....

Craig St. Clair | Verbum Product Manager |

Posts 918
Deacon Steve | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2019 12:32 PM

Craig St. Clair (Faithlife):

Clearly a Sedevacantist take-over of Verbum ;-).

Hahaha!! Stick out tongue

Posts 2992
SineNomine | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2019 1:51 PM

Craig St. Clair (Faithlife):

Mine too, and very curious. Clearly a Sedevacantist take-over of Verbum ;-).

I'll add this to the list of things for the resource team to fix....

It's actually correct, just momentarily disconcerting. The equivalent behaviour also occurred in Logos 7. The Saints dataset calls up Saints (and, in this case, special feasts) every time they appear on one of the liturgical calendars from which Saints draws. Today's display matches those provided by the cards of Butler's Lives, the derivative Pictorial Lives, and the Martyrology.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2019 3:00 PM

Craig St. Clair (Faithlife):
I'll add this to the list of things for the resource team to fix....

Nothing to fix, this is the expected behavior for saints ... for Saints, we have no options for which calendar shows so "all" calendars show. It is the lectionary that is "custom".

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 200
David J. Wilson | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2019 3:29 PM

A little more background that may help round out the story for those reading this: as currently stated in the Wikipedia article at  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chair_of_Saint_Peter 

Quote:

Early martyrologies indicate that two liturgical feasts were celebrated in Rome, centuries before the time of Charles the Bald, in honour of earlier chairs associated with Saint Peter, one of which was kept in the baptismal chapel of St. Peter's Basilica, the other at the catacomb of Priscilla.[4] The dates of these celebrations were January 18 and February 22. No surviving chair has been identified with either of these chairs. The feasts thus became associated with an abstract understanding of the "Chair of Peter", which by synecdoche signifies the episcopal office of the Pope as Bishop of Rome, an office considered to have been first held by Saint Peter, and thus extended to the diocese, the See of Rome. Though both feasts were originally associated with Saint Peter's stay in Rome, the ninth-century form of the Martyrologium Hieronymianum associated the January 18 feast with his stay in Rome, and the February 22 feast with his stay at Antioch. The two feasts were included in the Tridentine Calendar with the rank of Double, which Pope Clement VIII raised in 1604 to the newly invented rank of Greater Double.

In 1960 Pope John XXIII removed from the General Roman Calendar the January 18 feast of the Chair of Peter, along with seven other feast days that were second feasts of a single saint or mystery.[9] The February 22 celebration became a Second-Class Feast. This calendar was incorporated in the 1962 Roman Missal of Pope John XXIII, whose continued use Pope Benedict XVI authorized under the conditions indicated in his motu proprio Summorum Pontificum. Those traditionalist Catholics who do not accept the changes made by Pope John XXIII continue to celebrate both feast days: "Saint Peter's Chair at Rome" on January 18 and the "Chair of Saint Peter at Antioch" on February 22. 

Posts 200
David J. Wilson | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2019 4:12 PM

A little more background that may help round out the story for those reading this: as currently stated in the Wikipedia article at  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chair_of_Saint_Peter 

Quote:

Early martyrologies indicate that two liturgical feasts were celebrated in Rome, centuries before the time of Charles the Bald, in honour of earlier chairs associated with Saint Peter, one of which was kept in the baptismal chapel of St. Peter's Basilica, the other at the catacomb of Priscilla.[4] The dates of these celebrations were January 18 and February 22. No surviving chair has been identified with either of these chairs. The feasts thus became associated with an abstract understanding of the "Chair of Peter", which by synecdoche signifies the episcopal office of the Pope as Bishop of Rome, an office considered to have been first held by Saint Peter, and thus extended to the diocese, the See of Rome. Though both feasts were originally associated with Saint Peter's stay in Rome, the ninth-century form of the Martyrologium Hieronymianum associated the January 18 feast with his stay in Rome, and the February 22 feast with his stay at Antioch. The two feasts were included in the Tridentine Calendar with the rank of Double, which Pope Clement VIII raised in 1604 to the newly invented rank of Greater Double.

In 1960 Pope John XXIII removed from the General Roman Calendar the January 18 feast of the Chair of Peter, along with seven other feast days that were second feasts of a single saint or mystery.[9] The February 22 celebration became a Second-Class Feast. This calendar was incorporated in the 1962 Roman Missal of Pope John XXIII, whose continued use Pope Benedict XVI authorized under the conditions indicated in his motu proprio Summorum Pontificum. Those traditionalist Catholics who do not accept the changes made by Pope John XXIII continue to celebrate both feast days: "Saint Peter's Chair at Rome" on January 18 and the "Chair of Saint Peter at Antioch" on February 22. 

Posts 918
Deacon Steve | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2019 4:13 PM

MJ. Smith:

 ... for Saints, we have no options for which calendar shows so "all" calendars show. 

Given the use of the "old calendar" or lack thereof with the user community, perhaps an indicator that we need an option.

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Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2019 4:43 PM

Deacon Steve:
Given the use of the "old calendar" or lack thereof with the user community, perhaps an indicator that we need an option.

While an option would be nice, I have a number of issues I'd give higher priority. The old vs. new calendar issue pops up so rarely in the forums that I doubt it is broadly seen as an issue.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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