Orthodox Study Bible - Thoughts

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Mattillo | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Sep 3 2019 12:00 PM

Just curious if anyone out there has this resource or has interacted with it... does it bring anything interesting to the table?  I have more study bibles than I can shake a stick at so I'm thinking of not getting this but it seems like it might fill a unique niche...

Thanks in advance

https://www.logos.com/product/136179/the-orthodox-study-bible-notes 

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mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 3 2019 6:15 PM

I was really interested in this for the Old Testament translation which is supposed to be from the Septuagint. The notes might be useful, but without the OT text (the NT is the NKJV) I'm not sure about this one.

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

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DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 3 2019 6:23 PM

A company has text and notes.  I got it from them instead.

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Brad | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 3 2019 8:01 PM

Mattillo:

Just curious if anyone out there has this resource or has interacted with it... does it bring anything interesting to the table?  I have more study bibles than I can shake a stick at so I'm thinking of not getting this but it seems like it might fill a unique niche...

Thanks in advance

https://www.logos.com/product/136179/the-orthodox-study-bible-notes 

I'm shaking that same stick, Matillo, but I pre-ordered it for the same "unique niche" reasoning that you mentioned in your post.  Given the generous Faithlife return policy, you might want to take the plunge.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 3 2019 10:15 PM

I've owned the original dead-tree format for years. It is useful and interesting but not as "different" as some might assume. If your study Bibles are primarily Reformed, Lutheran, or Pentecostal, then this is a necessary addition. If your study Bibles are primarily Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran, this is a more optional addition ... but you really should support Orthodox resources in general.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 3 2019 10:40 PM

MJ. Smith:

 ... but you really should support Orthodox resources in general.

Agree,

but in this instance I own the notes and text in another platform as FL too slow to market, so probably won’t purchase this one for that reason, but if it makes it into a Orthodox base package in the future it will end up in my Logos library at that point.

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DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 4 2019 11:34 AM

MJ. Smith:

I've owned the original dead-tree format for years. It is useful and interesting but not as "different" as some might assume. If your study Bibles are primarily Reformed, Lutheran, or Pentecostal, then this is a necessary addition. If your study Bibles are primarily Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran, this is a more optional addition ... but you really should support Orthodox resources in general.

I’m actually loving my Orthodox Study Bibles and Base Package with the commentaries and materials it offers.  They bring a lot of good stuff to the table 👍😁👌

DAL

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Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 4 2019 12:00 PM

I wanted to share a few snippets to give a good flavour of this work which while not essential is well worth owning. You will notice that Psalm 1 references a few of the early church fathers (this happens occasionally). You will notice we often are told when the Orthodox church utilizes a passage in worship too. Finally in Ruth you will notice the notes point out significant deviation from the Hebrew MT by the LXX.

Psalms 1 + 2 

1 The Man in Ps 1 is the Lord Jesus Christ (JohnChr, AmbM, Eust, CyrAl, Aug, and Cass). Thus, the Incarnation sets the tone of Psalms, and in the Psalms the Incarnate Lord teaches His Church how to pray. This is why Psalms is the prayer book of the Church. Ps 1 presents how Jesus lived His life in this world by showing the contrast between His godly life and the life of the ungodly. The Church, then, is to follow His example: His behavior in relation to the ungodly (v. 1); His zeal for the truth (v. 2); and His holy and virtuous life (v. 3).

2 The Lord in Ps 2 is God the Father, and Jesus is called His anointed (v. 2), which means “His Christ.” Jesus is also called King (v. 6), which is declared by the Father’s eternal decree. Jesus is King without beginning and without end, and He is King over His holy hill of Zion, which is the Church. Jesus is also the Son of God the Father (v. 7), for He was begotten from the Father outside of time and “before all worlds” (Creed). He was also begotten in these last times by the Holy Spirit and the Virgin Mary, “for us men and for our salvation” (Creed). Then again, He was begotten in the sense of His Resurrection from the dead (Acts 13:32, 33). But Jesus is also the King over the nations (v. 8), which in due time, He will shatter like a potter’s vessel (v. 9) when He restores heaven and earth, and reigns eternally with His saints in “the world to come” (Creed). Therefore, the rulers of the nations are called to serve this King, or they will be judged; but blessed are all who trust in Him (v. 12).   The Church includes Ps 2 in the Nativity (Christmas) Eve and Good Friday services. On Nativity Eve it is used in the refrain (called the prokeimenon or gradual) before the Epistle is read in the Divine Liturgy. On Good Friday, the entire psalm is part of the First Hour prayers.

Metropolitan MAXIMOS et al., eds. Orthodox Study Bible. Accordance electronic ed. (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2008), paragraph 4963.

Matthew 5:1-16

CHAPTER 5 5:1, 2 In the OT, only a select few were chosen to hear God directly (see Ex 19:3-13). Here, God Incarnate speaks to the multitudes face to face. The mountain is a place where divine action enters human history, the place where God reveals Himself to man (17:1; Gn 22:2; Ex 3:1; 19:2; 3Kg 18:20). Seated is the traditional Jewish position for teaching with authority. Some early Christian preachers (for example, St. John Chrysostom) sat while the people stood. Matthew mentioning that Jesus opened his mouth emphasizes this teaching is “one-way,” that Jesus has come to speak with authority (7:29), and the disciples are there not to discuss or debate, but to listen. 5:3 Blessed in this context indicates heavenly, spiritual exaltation rather than earthly happiness or prosperity. In Hebrew, “poor” means both (1) the materially poor and (2) the faithful among God’s people. The poor in spirit are those who have the heart of the poor, the same attitude as the poor, and are totally dependent on God. 5:4 Those who mourn sorrow over the sufferings of this life (9:23), the sufferings of others (Jn 11:35), the state of the world (Lk 19:41), and their own sins (Lk 7:36-38). All of these are comforted by the power of God both in this world and in the age to come. Holy sorrow is part of repentance, conversion, and virtuous action, and is the firstfruit of infinite joy. It is to be distinguished from ungodly sorrow, a sadness that leads to despair (see 2Co 7:10). 5:5 Meekness is an attitude of being content with both honor and dishonor. It is an imitation of Christ, who said, “Learn from Me, for I am gentle [meek] and lowly in heart” (11:29). The meek are God-controlled and have mastery over their passions, especially anger. Meekness is not passive weakness, but strength directed and under control. The earth that the meek will inherit is not power or possession in this world, but the new earth, which is everlasting (Rev 21:1). 5:6 Those who hunger and thirst for righteousness see the presence of God and His Kingdom as the most important thing in life. They have a desperate craving for what is right before God, comparable to a starving person’s craving for food (see 6:33). 5:7 Mercy is love set in motion, expressed in action. God’s mercy in taking our sufferings on Himself in order to grant us His Kingdom sets us free from captivity to the evil one. In view of God’s mercy to all, we in turn are to be merciful to all. 5:8 “Pure” means unmixed with anything else. The pure in heart are completely devoted to the worship and service of God and accept no compromises. With the aid of the Holy Spirit, those who achieve purity practice all virtue, have no conscious evil in themselves, and live in temperance. This level of spirituality is attained by few, but all may strive for it. When the soul’s only desire is God, and a person’s will holds to this desire, then that person will indeed see God everywhere. 5:9 Being the source of peace, Christ found no price sufficient for peace other than shedding His own blood. In doing so, Christ reveals Himself to us as the Reconciler, the Prince of peace (Is 9:6; Eph 2:14-16). The Holy Spirit gives peace to those who imitate Christ. Thus, peacemakers share God’s peace with those around them, imitating Christ’s sacrificial love and participating in His work. By God’s grace, peacemakers become sons of God themselves. 5:10 Children of God uphold truth, refuse to compromise with the ways of the world, and give themselves to no other (6:24, 33; see 1Co 6:19, 20). Like Jesus, these will be persecuted for righteousness’ sake (see Jn 15:18-20). Christ’s kingdom is the crown awaiting the righteous. 5:11, 12 Those who suffer persecution for Christ walk the road of the prophets, saints, and martyrs. The Greek for be exceedingly glad means to “leap exceedingly with joy.” (See Acts 5:40, 41.)   5:14-19 This passage is read on days commemorating holy hierarchs. 5:13-16 Salt and light illustrate the role of disciples in society. Because of its preservative powers, its necessity for life, and its ability to give flavor, salt had religious and sacrificial significance (Lv 2:13; see also Nm 18:19; 2Ch 13:5). To eat salt with someone meant to be bound together in loyalty. As the salt of the earth, Christians are preservers of God’s covenant and give true flavor to the world. God is the true and uncreated Light. In the OT light is symbolic of God (Is 60:1-3), the divine Law (Ps 118:105), and Israel in contrast to all other nations. In the NT, the Son of God is called “light” (Jn 1:4-9; 8:12; 1Jn 1:5). Light is necessary both for clear vision and for life itself. Faith relies on this divine light, and believers become “sons of light” (Jn 12:36; 1Th 5:5) who shine in a perverse world (Php 2:15). In many parishes, the Pascha (Easter) Liturgy begins with a candle being presented and the invitation to “come receive the Light which is never overtaken by night.”

--Metropolitan MAXIMOS et al., eds. Orthodox Study Bible. Accordance electronic ed. (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2008), paragraph 8998. 

Ruth 2

CHAPTER 2 Boaz Favors Ruth (2:1-23) 2:1 Boaz prefigures Christ. Here he is introduced as a relative of both a faithless Jew (Elimelech) and, through marriage, a faithful one (Naomi). Boaz also had Gentile ancestry, for his mother was Rahab (Mt 1:5). 2:2 In humble acceptance of her position as foreigner, Ruth is willing to glean the Jews’ leftover grain. The New Testament reminds all Gentile believers to imitate her humility (Rom 11:19-21; Eph 2:11, 12). 2:8-10 Like the Canaanite woman in Mt 15:21-28, Ruth acknowledges that she does not deserve Boaz’s favor because she is a stranger. Like Christ, Boaz blesses her with his favor and protection. 2:11 The virtue of abandoning one’s former life for the sake of the Lord is a prominent and recurring theme. See note on 1:14, 15. 2:14 Ruth is rewarded for her dedication by an invitation to eat with Boaz. This meal prefigures the eucharistic Supper. 2:15, 16 In Christ, Gentiles are grafted to the tree of salvation (see Rom 11), and they share equally in the reception of grace. Here Boaz issues an order to his servants ensuring that Ruth, a Gentile, is given equal treatment and an equal share of grain. There is a significant difference between the Masoretic Text and the LXX in v. 16. The former has Boaz merely instruct his servants to let extra grain fall from their bundles, distorting the underlying meaning of his order. 2:20 Naomi blesses Boaz with words applicable to Christ. 2:22 A call to remain in the community of faith. To wander in another field is to go beyond the protection of Boaz and to be subject to all manner of danger (see vv. 8, 9).

--Metropolitan MAXIMOS et al., eds. Orthodox Study Bible. Accordance electronic ed. (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2008), paragraph 2560. 

And while not ideal since it is not the exact text designed for it the LEB Septuagint would give similar readings to the OT of the OSB.

-dan

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Veli Voipio | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 4 2019 12:28 PM

MJ. Smith:
but you really should support Orthodox resources in general.

Interesting point, and I agree.

Gold package, and original language material and ancient text material, SIL and UBS books, discourse Hebrew OT and Greek NT. PC with Windows 8.1

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Mattillo | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 4 2019 1:07 PM

Thanks!

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