Best OT Exegesis (?)

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Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Oct 15 2019 12:33 AM

Since I recently (finally) wrapped up Hebrew 1 I am wanting to invest in the most meticulous/authoritative OT exegetical series available.  

Preferably, I would like volumes that emphasize close analyses of the inspired grammar (I find that many “exegetical” commentaries lack serious grammatical analyses) from an eclectic group of academics of various traditions, including both Judaic and Christian scholars.

I am aware of the AYB, NICOT, WBC—just not sure which is considered the most in-depth.

In a similar vein, if anyone knows of reputable Paleo-Hebrew resources available on Logos I would be much obliged for some links.  I hope this doesn’t break any forum rules, but I recently spent some $$ on Jeff Benner’s works—until I got suspicious and began to research his “credentials”—which are non-existent😡.

After working my way all the way through Van Pelt’s excellent BBH course—I am finding out that in real time I need to learn Biblical Hebrew without the vowel pointings inasmuch as they are much later additions via the Masoretes.    Van Pelt states this early in the courses, but I was already hooked and just decided to still work my way through the course inasmuch as I have the pointed BHS anyway.  But, many words I see in journal papers, in Israel and in Hebrew grammars do not have the pointings.  That was the attraction to Benner’s works...until I found out he has had no formal schooling in Paleo-Hebrew (I have seen scathing rebukes of his works from credentialed linguists).  I rarely EVER purchase anything exegetical before I check the credentials of the author...for this very reason🙄.

Thank you in advance.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 15 2019 12:49 AM

Puddin’:
inspired grammar

I can't resist as I haven't seen this in the forums before. How does "inspired grammar" differ from "normal grammar"? Yes, I come from a background that derives Greek grammar from Proto-IndoEuropean (reconstructed) grammar so I very honestly don't know what you mean.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 270
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 15 2019 1:19 AM

MJ. Smith:

Puddin’:
inspired grammar

I can't resist as I haven't seen this in the forums before. How does "inspired grammar" differ from "normal grammar"? Yes, I come from a background that derives Greek grammar from Proto-IndoEuropean (reconstructed) grammar so I very honestly don't know what you mean.

Context my dear Watson—context!  

The thread is about OT exegetical works that actually engage the “inspired grammar” of the OT (i.e., Hebrew & [some] Aramaic).  The point is, I’m not interested in mere commentary, but rather I am looking for works that emphasize rigorous analyses of the “inspired” original languages—viz., the actual text itself.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 15 2019 1:47 AM

Got it. What I would call looking for the philologically oriented commentaries and their grandkids.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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HJ. van der Wal | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 15 2019 2:05 AM

Shalom Puddin'!

I am also curious what you mean by "inspired grammar".

Puddin’:

I am aware of the AYB, NICOT, WBC—just not sure which is considered the most in-depth.

Other technical commentary series that you could consider are: Hermeneia and Continental Commentaries, International Critical Commentary (ICC), International Exegetical Commentary and FL's own Evangelical Exegetical Commentary (EEC).

My personal favorite is still WBC.

You should also take serious the work of nineteenth century scholars like Carl Friedrich Keil and Franz Delitzsch. Their Commentary on the Old Testament may be dated (as are the older ICC volumes) but they very often will supply you with more information on Hebrew grammar than modern exegetical commentaries will give you.

Puddin’:

In a similar vein, if anyone knows of reputable Paleo-Hebrew resources available on Logos I would be much obliged for some links.  

You could start by reading Early History of the Alphabet: An Introduction to West Semitic Epigraphy and Palaeography by Joseph Naveh (Jerusalem 1987).

Puddin’:

I need to learn Biblical Hebrew without the vowel pointings inasmuch as they are much later additions via the Masoretes. 

The vowel pointings are indeed a later addition and I do not agree with John Gill on this matter BUT over the years I have come to take the Masoretic accents more seriously and I pay more attention to them rather than less.

If you want to read Hebrew without vowel signs I suggest you start learning modern Hebrew, e.g. by downloading the Duolingo app. In my experience it will support your study of Biblical Hebrew.

Edit: I now see you have already explained what you mean by "inspired grammar".

Posts 270
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 15 2019 2:28 AM

Thank you much HJ!  Excellent links & suggestions.  I will definitely be digging into these.  Just downloaded the ancient Phonecian alphabet alongside the evolution of the Hebrew alphabet.  Obviously, I am attempting to get as close to what was actually written in the Torah for better understanding.

I should have clarified that I do own Keil & Delitzsch, HALOT, B&D, BHS & UBS Handbooks for OT.  But, I am still lacking in-depth exegetical works based upon the original OT languages.  I did just pick up an excellent exegesis of Malachi by Allen Ross—but still not as in-depth as I would like.

Thanks again.  

If anyone else has any suggestions I would greatly appreciate it—esp. as it relates to Paleo-Hebrew works.

Posts 270
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 15 2019 2:29 AM

MJ. Smith:

Got it. What I would call looking for the philologically oriented commentaries and their grandkids.

Ahhh, I actually like that descriptor better.  Consider that stolen🤓.

Posts 270
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 15 2019 2:59 AM

Wowsie HJ.!  I reallyyyy like the ICC, Hermenia and IEC works.  I also found JPS commentary’s that look pretty intense from a Hebrew scholars.  

I was actually able to locate Naveh‘s work on ancient Semitics & Paleography free as a PDF! 

This is precisely the vein I was searching for.  Now, if you could spare about $4,000 for a fellow Hebrew student I would reallyyyy be much-o obliged 🤪.   You know, “more blessed to give than receive“ & stuff 😳!

Seriously though, thanks much.  

Posts 334
Andrew Biddinger | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 15 2019 6:34 AM

I've found this site a good resource: https://www.bestcommentaries.com/topcommentaries

Also, I've found Fee's recommendations helpful as well: https://www.logos.com/how-to-read-the-bible (Logos has a sale going on too)

Posts 3270
Mattillo | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 15 2019 6:46 AM

This is another good one if you haven't seen it before:

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/63727/1065477.aspx#1065477 

Posts 270
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 15 2019 7:37 PM

Andrew Biddinger:

I've found this site a good resource: https://www.bestcommentaries.com/topcommentaries

Also, I've found Fee's recommendations helpful as well: https://www.logos.com/how-to-read-the-bible (Logos has a sale going on too)

Right—these are both good resources.  I am just beginning to use bestcommentaries.com. Really like it.  Good ideas.  Thanks much.

Posts 270
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 15 2019 7:38 PM

Mattillo:

This is another good one if you haven't seen it before:

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/63727/1065477.aspx#1065477 

Wow—excellent resources and exactly what I am looking for.  

Much appreciated.

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