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Gregorio Billikopf | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Oct 15 2019 8:03 PM

I have encountered some questions on Hebrew nomenclature, and gladly, I have found almost all my answers. But there is one MAJOR question I have left. I find that the Infinitive comes in both Construct and Absolute states; but so does the Participle, at least as I find it described in Gesenius, come in both Absolute and Construct states. My Hebrew Paradigms chart from Logos, which has been so helpful, has Infinite with Construct and with Absolute; and Participle with Active and Passive. Is there a different terminology that is used more frequently today? Do the absolute and construct have any equivalence to active and passive? Both Logos and Accordance use absolute and construct but not active and passive in defining their verbs. You can see I am very lost and am probably not even asking the question correctly. I have done due diligence in looking at the various grammars and have gotten a lot of clarity except for these points. Thanks.

Posts 276
Gregorio Billikopf | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 15 2019 8:11 PM

Yet another way of phrasing this is that I find every permutation of either plural or singular with either construct or absolute, but nothing with Active or Passive.

So let me phrase my question a little better. I find every permutation of either plural or singular with either construct or absolute of the Qal Participle, but nothing with Active or Passive. I only find that in the Logos Hebrew Paradigms Chart and would love to know what the Ptc Act and Ptc Pas equivalent might be in one of the recent grammars.

Posts 78
Phil Quigley | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 25 2019 10:29 AM

I know this thread is over a month old. I'm not a Hebrew scholar, but I've read and studied Hebrew independently. So, take my answer with a grain of salt. In my understanding of Hebrew, Hebrew utilizes what are called verbal stems or binyanim. The basic verbal stem is the Qal. The other stems are built by adding certain blocks onto the Qal stem. These stems are the niphal, hiphil, hophal, pual, piel, and hithpael. The idea of active or passive voice would be encompassed by the stem that is used. I don't remember which stem holds the passive idea. I hope that helps answer your question. So, for the particple and infinitive the idea of active or passive would be dependent on the stem.

Posts 362
Batman | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 11 2020 10:37 PM

This may help
http://www.becomingjewish.org/learning_biblical_hebrew/pdf/qal_infinitive_absolute-hebrew.pdf

The question I have is, Are you doing self study, or a structured study? While Biblical Hebrew is an "easier" language to learn, it also has many nuances that we do not see as modern era people. They had a completely different way to convey the message they were presenting; again, often missed by the modern thought. 
If you are not studying from one well versed in Hebrew, I would highly recommend you do so. And then, I would recommend a study in the customs and culture; as these will help one understand the thought behind the words. If you are, this is great. 


Gregorio Billikopf:

I have encountered some questions on Hebrew nomenclature, and gladly, I have found almost all my answers. But there is one MAJOR question I have left. I find that the Infinitive comes in both Construct and Absolute states; but so does the Participle, at least as I find it described in Gesenius, come in both Absolute and Construct states. My Hebrew Paradigms chart from Logos, which has been so helpful, has Infinite with Construct and with Absolute; and Participle with Active and Passive. Is there a different terminology that is used more frequently today? Do the absolute and construct have any equivalence to active and passive? Both Logos and Accordance use absolute and construct but not active and passive in defining their verbs. You can see I am very lost and am probably not even asking the question correctly. I have done due diligence in looking at the various grammars and have gotten a lot of clarity except for these points. Thanks.

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