Do you know of addition Catholic Bibles in English - this is my current list

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Oct 17 2019 2:18 AM

 

Abbreviation

Name

Date

DRB

Douay-Rheims Bible

1582, 1609, 1610

DRC

Douay-Rheims Bible Challoner Revision

1749-1752

WVSS

Westminster Version of the Sacred Scripture

1913–1935

SPC

Spencer New Testament

1941

CCD

Confraternity Bible

1941

Knox

Knox Bible

1950

KLNT

Kleist–Lilly New Testament

1956

RSV–CE

Revised Standard Version Catholic Edition

1965–66

JB

Jerusalem Bible

1966

NAB

New American Bible

1970

TLB–CE

The Living Bible Catholic Edition

1971

NJB

New Jerusalem Bible

1985

CCB

Christian Community Bible

1988

NRSV–CE

New Revised Standard Version Catholic Edition

1991

GNT–CE

Good News Translation Catholic Edition

1993

RSV–2CE

Revised Standard Version, Second Catholic Edition

2006

CTS–NCB

CTS New Catholic Bible

2007

CPD

Catholic Public Domain Bible (no imprimatur)

2009

NABRE

New American Bible Revised Edition

2011/1986 (OT/NT)

LXX (King)

Septuagint (King) (no imprimatur)

2013

NLT-CE

New Living Translation Catholic Edition

2017

ESV-CE

English Standard Version Catholic Edition

2018

RNJB

Revised New Jerusalem Bible

2018

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Deacon Steve | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 17 2019 9:41 AM

New Catholic Version from Catholic Book Publishing.  Psalms (2002) and New Testament (recently).  Not sure if it has an imprimatur - sample pages do not show.

https://catholicbookpublishing.com/read/new-testament-new-catholic-version

There are some others listed (Contemporary English Version) on the USCCB website (you have most already).

http://usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/index.cfm

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Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 17 2019 10:14 AM

There is the 1979 Good news Bible too as the 1993 version is equivalent is a major revision with gender inclusive language.

-dan

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John W Gillis | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 17 2019 6:50 PM

MJ, that’s a pretty comprehensive list. There are a few I could add or elaborate on. Working backwards…

(2015) New Catholic Version (NCV) New Testament, as mentioned below by Deacon Steve. I note it here to affirm that it does indeed have an imprimatur & nihil obstat. A rescript approving publication is recorded from the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines. It’s a terrific translation, on the formal end of the scale. Smartly annotated.

(2013) The Message: Catholic/Ecumenical Edition. Not actually a Catholic Bible, and really not even a translation, but if the Living Bible can make the bar…

(2008-2012) New Community Bible (NCB). A major re-work of the CCB, likewise aimed at an ESL audience in mission lands. Heavily annotated, but without the liberation theology bent of the CCB. Impimatur, Imprimi Potest (India)

[2007 CTS Bible – presumably you know that this is not new, but is the 1966 JB with “Yahweh” replaced, and with the 1963 Grail Psalter in place of the JB Psalms]

(1995) Contemporary English Version (CEV). I include this contemptible translation because it is sometimes published in a “Catholic Edition”, is approved on the USCCB site for personal use (NT & Psalms), and served as the base translation for the insipid Lectionary For Masses with Children that was inflicted upon innocent parishioners in the U.S. for a while, a generation ago.

(1994/2000) Books of the New Testament (1994 Alba House) / New Testament: St Paul Catholic Edition (2000, Pauline Books). Translation by Mark Wauck. Leans toward the literal, but is very conversational. I like it a lot. Nihil obstat, imprimi potest, imprimatur (NCCB). Listed on USCCB website.

(1970) Alba House New Testament. Not to be confused with the Wauck work above… This is actually only the four gospels. Highly colloquial translation by Kevin Condon. Nihil obstat, imprimatur.

(1849-1862) Kenrick’s Challoner Revision. This was a very competent, well annotated update of the Challoner, which was a victim of its time. Logos has this on Community Pricing. It is available as PDF scans (2-vol NT, 4-vol OT, 1-vol revised NT). Kenrick was Archbishop of Baltimore at the time of publication.

(1836) Lingard’s Four Gospels. Published anonymously (“by A Catholic”) until a 2nd, posthumous edition. I believe this was the first translation of the gospels into English from the Greek by a Roman Catholic. It is quite competent. Lingard also penned a large, multi-volume history of England, which is still in print, as is his Four Gospels.

The only older work that I’m aware is still available today is a Jansenist work called The Four Gospels, with Moral Reflections (1707—1709), with commentary from Pasquier Quesnel, of which 101 propositions were condemned by Pope Clement XI in Unigenitus Dei Filius.

There were some other works – mostly but not all revisions of Rheims or Challoner – that have fallen into obscurity. I’m not sure if you were interested in works that would be difficult or impossible to obtain. I’ve published brief historical notes on the ones I’ve been able to identify, if you’re interested: http://maybetoday.org/scriptura/bible-in-english/catholic-bibles-a-modest-history-of-the-english-versions/

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 17 2019 7:01 PM

Fantastic - thanks all.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Chris K | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 12 2019 4:14 PM

I’m very thankful that awhile ago I found an new copy of The Catholic Scholars Pack on eBay that allowed me to get the NAB on Verbum (since it is no longer available).   That is still my favorite translation to use for personal/spiritual reading!

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