Greek Vocabulary Cards

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Posts 53
Matthias | Forum Activity | Posted: Sun, Oct 27 2019 1:15 PM

Hello,

Can I somehow create Greek Vocabulary Cards in Logos and use them with the Simple FlashCard Plus App?

Help appreciated!

Posts 3127
Doc B | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Oct 27 2019 1:28 PM

Logos has always had its own vocab card system, so yes you can create them in Logos.

To my knowledge, they aren't compatible with the app you mentioned. There may be a hack that can be used, so someone may chime in with it.

I would note that, in my opinion, the making of flash cards is about as important as the use of them, so don't look for shortcuts in making the cards. Ideally, you would make a full set by hand. (Yep, by hand.)

My thanks to the various MVPs. Without them Logos would have died early. They were the only real help available.

Faithlife Corp. owes the MVPs free resources for life.

Posts 12494
Forum MVP
NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Oct 27 2019 1:38 PM

ML1992:
Can I somehow create Greek Vocabulary Cards in Logos

sure. They are called Word Lists in Logos, look unter Documents. Those can be shared, so you may be able to use Word Lists for major introductory textbooks already existing

ML1992:
and use them with the Simple FlashCard Plus App?

Depends. Fathlife have their own Flashcard app which works automatically with your Word Lists. If you want to use another app, you'll need to export the Word List (via the print menu), probably best is to save in spreadsheet format, i.e. in XML which can be opened by many applications - possibly your Flashcard App, too - and which you can open in Excel if you need to shift around columns or whatever.

Exported Word Lists will have these fields/columns: 

Lemma Card Front Count Gloss Section

  

Running Logos 9 latest (beta) version on Win 10

Posts 2682
David Thomas | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Oct 27 2019 2:21 PM

Doc B:
I would note that, in my opinion, the making of flash cards is about as important as the use of them, so don't look for shortcuts in making the cards. Ideally, you would make a full set by hand. (Yep, by hand.)

this is great advice!

Making Disciples!  Logos Ecosystem = Logos8 on Microsoft Surface Pro 4 (Win10), Android app on tablet, FSB on iPhone, [deprecated] Windows App, Proclaim, Faithlife.com, FaithlifeTV via Connect subscription.

Posts 53
Matthias | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 31 2019 10:32 AM

Doc B:

I would note that, in my opinion, the making of flash cards is about as important as the use of them, so don't look for shortcuts in making the cards. Ideally, you would make a full set by hand. (Yep, by hand.)

why that?

and thank you for the answers, guys!

Posts 1049
Lew Worthington | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 31 2019 11:42 AM

Testimonial evidence may not be worth much, but I used to write my own; maybe a couple thousand or more of them in various languages.

I think there's merit to what Doc B said, especially if you learn well by writing. In my case, my "distinct" (translation: "sloppy") handwriting was both a benefit and a liability since I would associate the remembrance of a word with the way I wrote the eta, for example. But at times, that association was strong enough that I may not remember it as well when seeing the words in a book where my unique eta was missing.

My first amateur guess is that this type of thing (associating the definition in a vocab list with the way it's written on a card) is analogous to the way we might remember that Romans 5:5 is on the lower right corner of the Bible we read decades ago. My second amateur guess is that the investment required to write hundreds of vocab cards pays off for some people better than for others. My third amateur guess is that the more episodic content we marshal for the memorization process -- whether it includes the act of writing the cards, inventing creative mnemonics, or whatever -- the better results and the stronger retention we'll get.

Posts 6004
DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 31 2019 1:44 PM

ML1992:

Doc B:

I would note that, in my opinion, the making of flash cards is about as important as the use of them, so don't look for shortcuts in making the cards. Ideally, you would make a full set by hand. (Yep, by hand.)

why that?

and thank you for the answers, guys!

I have not written out vocab cards but have taken to writing out my vocab I am learning.

Writing out your vocab as a daily activity helps with 

  1. character recognition
  2. syllable recognition 
  3. knowing spelling (not just recognising a word)

These things come to help you

  1. be more confident in both reading and pronunciation of words
  2. be more ready to understand how words inflect.

From my experience if you want to learn a language you need to go beyond sight recognition. Writing it by hand is a important part of this process. Electronic flash cards are a good tool in learning just don’t stop with them being your only tool.

Posts 3127
Doc B | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 1 2019 6:45 AM

Doc B:

I would note that, in my opinion, the making of flash cards is about as important as the use of them, so don't look for shortcuts in making the cards. Ideally, you would make a full set by hand. (Yep, by hand.)

why that?

Can't answer concisely, so let me tell you a short story.

I have taught introductory statistics for nearly 30 years. I learned an easy trick very early in the process (still in grad school, actually) that has proven to work time and again, and work across various disciplines not related to stats.  As you might guess, the trick is related to what I mentioned in my first response, quoted above. Here's the trick.

I allow a 'cheat sheet' on my final exams. The sheet can be up to 8 1/2" x 11", can be written on both sides, and can contain anything the student wants without exception. Simple enough, right? Why?

I've found many students don't spend serious time studying for the exams, including some pretty responsible students. They'll either cram for a few hours the night before (and think they've worked hard at it) or pay for a review session from one of the commercial businesses. Neither is sufficient except for the most highly skilled student.

What the cheat sheet does is amazing. A student who almost refuses to study will spend 12, 18, even 24 working hours on a cheat sheet, trying to get all the info on there they need, deciding which formulae to include, and so on. When they put a formula on the sheet they don't know how to use, they'll go figure it out and include a couple steps on the sheet as a reminder. (This is one of the best ways to study...assimilate and summarize...it uses the highest cortical processes.) In the process of making decisions about what to include, then writing all that down (or typing/printing it, which is slightly less helpful but still a positive use of time), they use mental processes that transfer information from short-term to long-term memory and enable understanding of complex material that simple rote review cannot do. And in a few cases, they end up doing this as group work and the student(s) who explain and demonstrate the material to the other students engage in the best form of studying: teaching.

All that for this: Hand writing your flash cards uses cortical processes that never get touched in simple review (reading). Saying things out loud from the cards uses processes that aren't used in simple reading, either. Ideally, you will speak out loud what you are writing when you make the hand-made cards, which engages the greatest part of your conscious mind in the process. It is a step I've found very helpful both as an instructor and as a student of Greek.

I hope this makes sense. The advice is free, so use what you want.

My thanks to the various MVPs. Without them Logos would have died early. They were the only real help available.

Faithlife Corp. owes the MVPs free resources for life.

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